University of Pittsburgh

UNDERGRADUATE
Bulletin

Swanson School of Engineering

BSE Degree Program Descriptions

 

 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

The Engineering Science Program is designed for students who have a strong interest in science and mathematics as well as a desire to acquire the skills and perspective of engineering.  The Engineering Science Program offers flexible curricula in several interdisciplinary areas of concentration.  The program is built on sequences of courses from multiple science and engineering programs. All areas of concentration combine in-depth exposure to both science and engineering.  All areas of concentration include a two-term capstone design experience.  The overall goal of the program is to develop each student’s ability to think analytically across disciplines and develop a knowledge base well suited to tackle future technical challenges that will require a thorough understanding of a discipline in the physical sciences and/or mathematics combined with engineering.  Interested students are encouraged to pursue the Engineering Science degree jointly with the University Honors College (UHC) by completing the requirements for Engineering Science and satisfying the special degree requirements of the UHC.  The Engineering Science program is ideal preparation for graduate school in a wide range of disciplines, for rewarding careers in industry, and is an excellent background for those who wish to pursue careers in other professions, such as management, law, education, or medicine.

NOTE:  The Engineering Physics curriculum (which had been available as a separate Engineering Physics Program until 2010) is now an area of concentration within Engineering Science.  Students still completing their Engineering Physics degree will continue to follow their curriculum (which is identical to the curriculum for the Engineering Physics area of concentration).

The program objectives for Engineering Science are to produce engineers who build successful, diverse careers based on:

  • an understanding of the physical/life sciences, engineering analysis and design, and interdisciplinary problem solving;
  • a commitment to ongoing professional development as exemplified by, for example, graduate study, training, conference participation, and certification;
  • advancement and leadership in professional and/or community life.

For more information on the program, contact mseugrad@engr.pitt.edu or see http://www.engr.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/ESCI/What_is_Engineering_Science_/

 

Engineering Science Undergraduate Curriculum

The Engineering Science Program currently offers two areas of concentration:  Engineering Physics and Nanotechnology.

Engineering Physics prepares students for engineering practice based on a curriculum designed to develop an understanding of physics and its application in electrical engineering and materials science through classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory experience.  The core of the curriculum is comprised of a sequence of fundamental courses in modern physics, electricity and magnetism of materials, design of electronic circuits, semiconductor devices, and signal processing.  The curriculum culminates with program electives and a two-term Senior Design Project that allows the students to focus their interests.  The design project builds on the knowledge gained in coursework and emphasizes independent and team problem solving under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

Area of Concentration: Engineering Physics Sample Curriculum

 

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ECE 0031 Linear Circuits and Systems 1
3
PHYS 0219 Basic Laboratory Physics for Science and Engineering
2
  Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ECE 0041 Linear Circuits and Systems 2
3
ECE 0257 Analysis and Design of Electronic Circuits
3
EE 1201 Electronic Measurements and Circuits Laboratory
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1053 Structures of Crystals & Diffraction
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials
3
PHYS 0479 Principles of Modern Physics 1
3
PHYS 1331 Mechanics
3
PHYA 1351 Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1063 Ph Transf & Micro Evol
3
ECE 1247 Semiconductor Device Theory
3
ECE 1552 Signals and Systems Analysis
3
PHYS 0481 Principles of Modern Physics 2
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1058 Electromagnetic Properties of Materials
3
ECE 1266 Applications of Fields and Waves
3
ESCI 1801 Senior Design 1
3
PHYS 1361 Wave Motion and Optics
3
  Program Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 1560** Complex Variables and Applications
3
ECE 1212 Electronic Circuit Design Laboratory
3
ENGRPH 1802 Engineering Design 2
3
Program Elective
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

*or PHYS 1341
** or MATH 1550
courses in red constitute a minor in Physics
130 total credits
51 credits minimum of Engineering, 52 credits minimum of Math/Science

 

Nanotechnology prepares students for engineering practice based on a curriculum designed to develop an understanding of the effect of nanoscale dimensions on the physical behavior of materials, systems, and devices (nanocharacterization and nanometrology), as well as knowledge of processes used to fabricate useful nanoscale materials, systems, and devices (nanomanufacturing).  Students take courses in modern physics or chemistry, materials engineering or bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanoscience, fabrication and design in nanotechnology and the materials science of nanostructures.  The curriculum culminates with program electives and a two-term Senior Design Project.  The design project builds on the knowledge gained in coursework and emphasizes independent and team problem solving under the guidance of a faculty mentor.  Nanotechnology has two curricular options, one emphasizing Physics and Materials Science and the other Chemistry and Bioengineering.

Area of Concentration:  Nanotechnology Sample Curriculum for Physics/Materials Emphasis

 

 

  THIRD TERM  CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
CHEM 1 Core chemistry course
3
LIFESCI 1 Basic Life Science
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structure & Properties
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
16

 

 

          

 

  FOURTH TERM  CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
CHEM 2 Core Chemistry course
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
LIFESCI 2 Basic Life Science
3
BIOENG 1 Core Bioengineering course
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
15

 

 

  FIFTH TERM CREDITS 
ENGR 0240 Introduction to Nanotechnology & Nanoengineering
3
BIOENG 2 Core bioengineering course
3
MEMS 1010 Exp. Methods in MSE
3
MEMS 1053 Structures of Crystals & Diffraction
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 1  
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
3
   
18

 

 

  SIXTH TERM  CREDITS
ENGR 0241 Fabrication & Design in Nanotechnology
3
  H/SS Elective 3
3
CHEM 3 Core chemistry course
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 2
3
  H/SS Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
15

 

 

SEVENTH TERM CREDITS
ENGR 0020 Probability & Statistics
4
  Nanotechnology Elective 3
3
ESCI 1801 Senior Design 1
3
MEMS 1057 Micro/Nano Manufacturing
3
  H/SS  Elective 5
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
16

 

 

  EIGHTH TERM  CREDITS
ESCI 1802 Senior Design 2
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 4
3
MATH 1560* Complex Variables & Applications
3
MEMS 1063 Phase Transformations & Microstructure Evolutions
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 4
3
  H/SS Elective 6
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
18

 

 

 

 

 

 

*or MATH 1560

Classes in red constitute a minor in Bioengineering if the student also takes BIOENG 1085 Seminar

Classes in green constitute a minor in Chemistry if students add two 1-cr Chemistry Lab courses

129 Total Credits

49 credits minimum of Engineering, 50 credits minimum of Math/Science

 

 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Industrial Engineering (IE) is all about choices. It is the engineering discipline that offers the most wide-ranging array of opportunities in terms of employment, and it is distinguished by its flexibility. While other engineering disciplines tend to apply skills to specific areas, industrial engineers may be found working everywhere from traditional manufacturing companies to airlines, distribution companies to financial institutions, hospitals to consulting companies, high-tech corporations to luxury retailers. Engineers are educated to design and build things, but IEs are educated to design and improve the productivity and quality of integrated systems of people, material, computers, information, equipment, and other resources. IEs draw upon the specialized knowledge and skills in the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles, methods and modeling tools of engineering analysis to make improvements in business processes. In addition to making significant contributions to corporate profitability, they also make the workplace a more productive and streamlined environment. The Department of Industrial Engineering meets the challenge of the growing complexity of modern industry through an intensive educational program that includes a required international component. Building upon a solid foundation in the basic sciences, engineering, and computers, the curriculum provides the student with a capability for systems analysis and design that crosses traditional disciplinary lines and an awareness of and concern for the demands of today's dynamic social systems. The industrial engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

 

Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The objectives of our undergraduate program are for our graduates to be:

  • Successful professionals, who are adaptive to changes in technology and our global society, in their desired career path. This includes industrial engineering based careers, as well as other professional disciplines
  • Pursuers of advanced knowledge to facilitate their desired goals
  • Active leaders in their profession and/or community

The IE faculty has committed itself to the broad, multidisciplinary approach needed to solve problems in today's organizations. In addition to core courses in industrial engineering, you will be exposed to the humanities and social sciences with a global focus and have the opportunity to select four technical electives. These technical electives may be chosen from specialized and advanced offerings of the industrial engineering department. In consultation with your advisor, up to two of these electives may be selected from other programs in the University such as other engineering departments, the sciences, mathematics, business, computer science, or information science.

Recognizing that engineering is an increasingly global profession, the undergraduate program is also committed to providing its graduates with the skill they need to compete on an international basis. Such skills will enable Pitt IE graduates to not only have a distinct employment advantage, but will also provide them with a cross-cultural awareness that will enhance their leadership abilities. This commitment is emphasized through an international requirement for all of our undergraduates for which students are expected to complete an international experience, or, in some cases select an integrated set of humanities and social sciences courses with a global focus. The final term of our undergraduate program includes a capstone senior design course in which you, working in small teams with other students, will complete a semester long project in a corporate setting. These projects are sponsored by local industry through our Sponsor An Industrial Engineering Team (SAINT) program, jointly supervised by an individual from the company and an IE faculty member.

For more information on the industrial engineering program contact ie@engr.pitt.edu or www.engineering.pitt.edu/industrial

 

THIRD TERM CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 3
4
IE 1040 Engineering Economic Analysis
3
IE 1054 Productivity Analysis
3
ENGR 0020 Probability & Statistics for Engineers 1
4
EMGR 0022 Material Structures and Properties
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
17


FOURTH TERM CREDITS
MATH 0280 Intro to Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
IE 0015 Intro to Information Systems Engineering
3
IE 1052 Manufacturing Processes & Analysis
3
IE 1071 Probability and Statistics for Engineers 2
4
  Humanities/Social Science Elective 3
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
16


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
IE 1051 Engineering Product Design
3
IE 1061 Human Factors Engineering
3
IE 1081 Operations Research
3
ENGR 1869 Intro to EE for Non-EEs
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1035 Engineering Management
3
IE 1055 Facility Layout and Material Handling
3
IE 1082 Probabilistic Methods in Operations
Research
3
IE 1083 Discrete Event Simulation
3
ENGR 1010 Communication Skills for Engineers
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1080 Supply Chain Management
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
Technical Elective 1
3
Technical Elective 2
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 4
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


EIGHTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1090 Senior Projects
4
  Humanities/Social Science Elective 5
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 6
3
Technical Elective 3
3
Technical Elective 4
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
16

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Materials limitations often impede technological and social progress. The materials engineer applies special knowledge of the structure, behavior, and properties of materials to solve these engineering problems. The engineer may be concerned with developing and improving processes for producing metals and alloys or ceramics; developing new alloys or improving existing alloys; and/or achieving better use of alloys and other materials. New materials must be designed for a variety of functions, including structural, esthetic, electrical, or magnetic and operating environments. Materials may come in forms so minute that the work is done under a microscope or in forms so large that special handling cranes are required.

Research efforts in the department involve work on the development of new high-strength steels, corrosion and oxidation, structural and electronic ceramics, smart materials, high-temperature materials, plastic deformation, phase transformations, and strengthening mechanisms. A number of graduate students are engaged in thesis research on these topics, and undergraduates are encouraged to work on related senior projects. The materials science and engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http:// www.abet.org. For more information on the program, contact mseugrad@engr.pitt.edu or see http:// www.engr.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/Materials_Science_and _Engineering_Curriculum/.

Materials Science and Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The undergraduate program is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the structure and properties of materials, the principles underlying the processing of materials, and the concepts of engineering design and problem solving. Both theory and practice are emphasized. Laboratory experiences are integrated into the curriculum, and a variety of professional and engineering science electives are available. When desirable, specialized programs can be arranged for the students with well-defined interests and goals. Students are prepared to accept positions in production, research, and management, in both the basic materials and advanced or high-tech materials industries. This versatile education is a strong preparation for graduate work in metallurgy and materials and other related fields.

The major objectives of the materials science and engineering program are to

  • Prepare students to assume positions of technical leadership in industries that require their specialized knowledge of materials science and engineering.
  • Provide students with an education, grounded in the fundamentals, enabling them to succeed in graduate studies and research in materials science and engineering.
  • Encourage students to remain committed and engaged in the discipline of materials science and engineering throughout their careers.
  • Provide students with a comprehensive education in engineering science that will prepare them to succeed in management positions in industry or other professional careers (e.g. teaching, law, etc.).

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
MEMS 0024 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0145 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 2
3
MEMS 0031 Electrical Circuits
3
MEMS 0040 Materials and Manufacturing
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
  Communication Skills Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1010 Experimental Methods in MSE
3
MEMS 1052 Heat and Mass Transfer
3
MEMS 1053 Structure of Crystals and Diffraction
3
MEMS 1058 Electromagnetic Properties of Material
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multicomponent Materials
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1011 Structure and Properties Laboratory
2
MEMS 1028 Mechanical Design 1
3
MEMS 1063 Phase Transformation and Evolution
3
MEMS 1070 Mechanical Behavior of Materials
3
  MSE Technical Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
14


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
ENGR 0020 Probability and Statistics
4
MEMS 1030 Material Selection
3
MEMS 1079 Senior Materials Research Project
3
  MSE Technical Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1043 Senior Design Project
3
MSE Technical Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

Concentration in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy for Undergraduate Students

The concentration program of study in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy is offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science.  This concentration is available as an option for all undergraduate engineering students pursuing the BS degree in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering or engineering physics. Four courses (12 credits) are required to complete the concentration.

The goal of this concentration is to provide a strong educational and training program focused on the use of physical metallurgy, advanced alloy design philosophies and modern thermomechanical processing strategies for the enhanced design and manufacture of high-performance steels.

Requirements

To obtain a background in ferrous physical metallurgy, the following four courses are required:

  1. MEMS 1010 – Experimental Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
  2. MEMS 1001 – Advanced Physical Metallurgy
  3. MEMS 1002 – Principles and Applications of Steel Design
  4. MEMS 1003 – Principles and Applications of Steel Processing Design

Enrollment

Students considering enrolling in the ferrous physical metallurgy concentration area are encouraged to declare during their sophomore year.  Interested students may wish to speak with Dr. Anthony DeArdo (deardo@engr.pitt.edu) or Dr. Isaac Garcia (Garcia@engr.pitt.edu) for more information.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mechanical engineering is concerned with both energy use and the design of machines and systems in such sectors as transportation, manufacturing, materials handling, power generation, and environmental control. Mechanical engineers are involved in design, development, research, management, and related activities in these fields. The breadth and diversity of the profession requires an undergraduate curriculum that provides a sound foundation in the basic sciences, computational skills including use of computers, and the fundamentals of engineering and engineering design. This curriculum provides a base for future professional growth and is also an excellent background for those who wish to pursue careers in other professions including management, law, or medicine. The mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET< http://www.abet.org. For more information on the program, contact pittmems@engr.pitt.edu or see http://www.engr.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/Mechanical_Engineering_Curriculum/.

 

Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

In the first two years, the mechanical engineering curriculum concentrates on the fundamentals of sciences, mathematics, and engineering. The last two years provide increased depth in the engineering sciences, including fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and systems analysis and also provide exposure to engineering applications, such as mechanical measurements, manufacturing, mechanical design, and thermal systems. Sufficient technical electives are allowed to permit each student to explore areas of special interest.

Course work in the social sciences and humanities is included for the enhancement of the student’s awareness of the importance of social, political, and economic problems in the practice of engineering. Where appropriate, the upper-level courses introduce consideration of human values, social benefits, and constraints to prepare future practicing engineers to be responsive to such concerns.

The major objectives of the program are to:

  • Demonstrate successful application of mechanical engineering knowledge and skills for industry, public sector organizations or their profession.
  • Pursue life-long learning through advanced professional degrees, graduate studies in engineering, professional training or engineering certification.
  • Demonstrate professional and intellectual growth as leaders in their profession and/or community.

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
MEMS 0024 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0145 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 2
3
MEMS 0031 Electrical Circuits
3
MEMS 0040 Materials and Manufacturing
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
Communication Skills Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1014 Dynamic Systems
3
MEMS 1028 Mechanical Design 1
3
MEMS 1052 Heat and Mass Transfer
3
Engineering Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1015 Rigid-Body Dynamics
3
MEMS 1029 Mechanical Design 2
3
MEMS 1041 Mechanical Measurements 1
3
MEMS 1051 Applied Thermodynamics
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1042 Mechanical Measurements 2
3
MEMS 1072 Applied Fluid Dynamics
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  Dynamic Systems Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1043 Senior Design Project
3
MEMS 1065 Thermal Systems Design
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

Concentration in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy for Undergraduate Students

The concentration program of study in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy is offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science.  This concentration available as an option for all undergraduate engineering students pursuing the BS degree in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering or engineering physics. Four courses (12 credits) are required to complete the concentration.

The goal of this concentration is to provide a strong educational and training program focused on the use of physical metallurgy, advanced alloy design philosophies and modern thermomechanical processing strategies for the enhanced design and manufacture of high-performance steels.

Requirements

To obtain a background in ferrous physical metallurgy, the following four courses are required:

  1. MEMS 1010 – Experimental Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
  2. MEMS 1101 – Advanced Physical Metallurgy
  3. MEMS 1102 – Principles and Applications of Steel Design
  4. MEMS 1103 – Principles and Applications of Steel Processing Design

Enrollment

Students considering enrolling in the ferrous physical metallurgy concentration area are encouraged to declare during their sophomore year.  Interested students may wish to speak with Dr. Anthony DeArdo (deardo@engr.pitt.edu) or Dr. Isaac Garcia (Garcia@engr.pitt.edu) for more information.