University of Pittsburgh

UNDERGRADUATE
Bulletin

Swanson School of Engineering

BSE Degree Program Descriptions

 

 

Students enter one of the specific engineering major programs below at the sophomore level after successfully completing the Freshman Engineering Program.

BIOENGINEERING

The undergraduate program in bioengineering combines education in engineering and biological sciences, forming a unique experience to prepare students for today’s technical challenges in medicine and biology. Our focus is on developing engineers who can apply an analytic approach to solving problems in living systems. Thus, we provide students with a comprehensive education in both engineering and the life sciences. Students enrolled in the program will be prepared for continued graduate studies or a career in a bioengineering-related industry. The program also provides a solid undergraduate education for further studies in a school of medicine. The bioengineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

In keeping with the two-fold mission of the Department of Bioengineering to

  • provide a high quality engineering education to both undergraduate and graduate students and
  • be a leader in research in specific areas encompassed by Bioengineering,

The Bioengineering undergraduate curriculum  has the objective to prepare students to achieve their post-baccalaureate goal of:

  • an industrial career in bioengineering or related field;
  • graduate school (MS and PhD programs related to bioengineering); or
  • professional school (Medical, Dental, Health Related, Business, and Law).

To achieve the objective, students are:

  • Provide both a broad knowledge of the technical and social principles of bioengineering as well as a focused education in one concentration area within bioengineering, and
  • Prepared through educational experiences beyond the classroom that deepen their understanding of the technical and non-technical issues in bioengineering, process and design.

The Bioengineering undergraduate curriculum has seven components:

  • Mathematics (6 courses)
  • Basic Sciences (7 courses/1 lab)
  • Humanities and Social Sciences (6 courses)
  • Basic Engineering (3 courses)
  • Core Bioengineering (11 courses, 6 seminars)
  • Bioengineering Concentrations (6 courses)
  • Advanced Engineering and Science (2 courses)

with options for

  • Dual Degrees, Minors and Certificates

Mathematics

      We require that students master basic mathematical skills in analytical geometry, calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, and statistics as preparation for mastery of bioengineering applications.  The basic math courses include

  • MATH 0220 (4 credits):  Analytical Geometry & Calculus 1
  • MATH 0230 (4 credits):  Analytical Geometry & Calculus 2
  • MATH 0240 (4 credits):  Analytical Geometry & Calculus 3
  • MATH 0280 (3 credits):  Introduction to Matrices & Linear Algebra
  • MATH 0290 (3 credits):  Differential Equations
  • Statistics (4 credits): ENGR 0020 (Probability & Statistics for Engineers 1).

Current MATH course descriptions can be found at the A&S Course Descriptions web site.

Basic Sciences

      Engineering practice is frequently described as “applied science”.  In addition to knowledge of and ability to use basic physics and chemistry, bioengineers need to be conversant with and able to use concepts of biology and physiology.  Because of the importance of cellular processes in bioengineering applications, we have developed our own (required) 2-course sequence in cell and molecular biology.  We DO NOT accept general biology (BIOSC 0150 and 0160) as meeting the cell biology requirement or as advanced science courses.  The basic science requirements include

  • PHYS 0174 (4 credits):  Basic Physics for Science & Engineering 1
  • PHYS 0175 (4 credits):  Basic Physics for Science & Engineering 2
  • CHEM 0960 (3credits):  General Chemistry for Engineers 1
  • CHEM 0970 (3 credits):  General Chemistry for Engineers 2
  • BIOENG 1070 (3 credits):  Introductory Cell Biology 1
  • BIOSC 0050 (Lab – 1 credit):  Biology 1 Lab
  • BIOENG 1071 (3 credits):  Introductory Cell Biology2 or BIOENG 1072 (3 credits): Introductory Cell Biology 2
  • BIOSC 1250 (3 credits):  Human Physiology

 

Humanities and Social Sciences

      The Swanson School of Engineering (SSOE) requires all undergraduates to complete at least six humanities and social science elective courses from the School’s list of approved courses in order to satisfy SSOE and ABET accreditation requirements for breadth and depth.  Complete rules for breadth and depth can be found at the web site.

      The Department of Bioengineering feels that ethics is such an integral part of societal practice of bioengineering that we have developed our own bioethics course (BIOENG 1241 (3 credits):  Social, Political, and Ethical Issues in Bioengineering) that emphasizes the fact that we practice bioengineering in the real world and that we need to be aware of the broad societal impact of doing so.

      BIOENG 1241 is a REQUIRED course for all bioengineering undergraduate students.  Because of the strong humanities and social science basis, BIOENG 1241 is acceptable as one of the required six humanities and social science electives.  Thus bioengineering undergraduates need at least five additional humanities and social science elective courses drawn from the School’s list of approved courses.

Please note that A&S courses cross-listed with CGS that are designated as self-paced (self), online (www) or hybrid online (hybrid) are not acceptable for fulfilling the humanities/social science requirement.

      “W” requirement:  All students must have a “W”riting course, designated as such in their academic record, in order to satisfy graduation requirements.  The “W” can be satisfied by a course in any department.  However, most students choose to take a three-credit course in the humanities/social sciences.  A one-credit “W” addition to a three credit course is also acceptable.  A two-credit “W” course satisfies the”W” requirement, but cannot be used to satisfy a course requirement.  Listings of “W” courses can be found at the A&S Course Descriptions web site.

Basic Engineering

      The basic engineering courses include

  • ENGR 0011 (3 credits):  Engineering Analysis I
  • ENGR 0012 (3 credits):  Engineering Analysis II
  • ENGR 0135 (3 credits):  Statics & Mechanics of Materials I

The common Freshman courses, ENGR 0011 and ENGR 0012 are integrated with the Freshman math, physics, and chemistry courses with the specific goals of (1) introducing students to fundamentals of engineering common to all engineering disciplines, (2) providing an overview of how engineers integrate math, physics, chemistry, and communications into solving practical problems of interest to society and (3) providing a rigorous foundation in design of computer programs to solve engineering problems.

ENGR 0135 is a basic course in statics and mechanics of materials that applies basic concepts from physics in understanding the effect of external forces acting on particles and deformable bodies with emphasis on how material responses to external forces impact engineering choices of appropriate materials to use to meet design specifications.

Core Bioengineering

      The bioengineering core, which consists of,

  • BIOENG 1210 (3 credits):  Biothermodynamics or BIOENG 1211 (3 credits): Honors Biothermodynamics
  • BIOENG 1220 (3 credits):  Biotransport Phenomena
  • BIOENG 1255 (4 credits):  Dynamic Systems
  • BIOENG 1310 (3 credits):  Bioinstrumentation
  • BIOENG 1320 (3credits):  Biosignals and Systems
  • BIOENG 1630 (3 credits):  Biomechanics 1
  • BIOENG 1002 (3 credits):  Intramural Internship
  • BIOENG 1150 (3 credits):  Biomethods
  • Imaging Course (3 credits): Selected from approved lilst
  • BIOENG 1160 (3 credits):  Senior Design 1
  • BIOENG 1161 (3 credits):  Senior Design 2
  • BIOENG 1085 (0 credits/6 required):  Seminar

has been designed to provide students with exposure to the basic engineering disciplines that bioengineers use and are conversant with in practicing the bioengineering profession, BIOENG 1210, 1220, and 1255 provide knowledge and applications in thermal/fluid engineering and control of thermal fluid systems which are important in design and operation of tissue culture applications and artificial organs technology.  BIOENG 1310, 1320, and 1255 provide knowledge and applications in electrical engineering that are required for data acquisition, signal processing, imaging, and systems control.  BIOENG 1630, coupled with ENGR 0135, provides knowledge and applications that are required to model and design solutions in such diverse areas as motion and balance, prosthetics design, and soft tissue mechanics.  Both BIOENG 1002 and 1150 are laboratory, research based courses that focus on communications skills; BIOENG1002 on preparation and public presentation of research, BIOENG 1150 on analysis and written communication.  Senior Design (BIOENG 1160 & 1161) is a two-semester capstone sequence that challenges teams of students to develop and implement practical solutions to real problems.  Finally BIOENG 1085 is used both as a vehicle for communication between the department and students and as a setting to provide diverse perspectives on the professional practice of bioengineering.

Bioengineering Concentrations

      The Bioengineering Concentrations offer the student an opportunity to focus on an area of bioengineering practice in greater depth than is possible in the core course.  The department offers four concentrations:

  • Bioimaging and Signals
  • Biomechanics
  • Cellular Engineering
  • Medical Product Engineering.

Each concentration consists of seven courses split between concentration requirements and concentration electives.  Each concentration has an imaging course requirement that meets the needs of the concentration.  Concentration requirements are courses that the concentration leader and faculty deem required knowledge for professional practice in the concentration.  While narrower than the breadth reflected in the core bioengineering curriculum, each concentration can be further divided into tracks within the concentration with associated courses.  Concentration electives are generally drawn from a restricted list of courses that offer greater depth in track of interest to the student.

      Note: because of the large number of bioengineering students interested in medical school post-graduation, CHEM 0310 (Organic Chemistry1) and CHEM 0320 (Organic Chemistry 2) are accepted as a concentration elective in all concentrations.

      Note: CHEM 0320 (Organic Chemistry 2) is a prerequisite for BIOENG 1620 (Introduction to Tissue Engineering) and BIOENG 1810 (Biomaterials and Biocompatibility). Students who want to take those courses need to take the CHEM 0310/0320 sequence prior to doing so.

      Note: particular minors are easier to obtain through different concentrations.  The key to obtaining a minor is to start planning early.

Advanced Engineering and Science

 Students are required to take two advanced engineering or science elective courses. If the student has already taken a course in a discipline, the Advanced Engineering/Science elective must be at a more advanced level (depth) or cover a different aspect of the discipline (breadth).

      Note: The University Bulletin states "Students may not earn credit for courses that substantially duplicate the content of other courses for which they have already received credit." Other departments offer courses that substantially duplicate content in some BIOENG courses (which focus on engineering applications in biology, physiology, and medicine). Known courses under this prohibition that students cannot use for an advanced engineering or science elective include:
     ECE/CoE 0031 & MEMS 0031 (duplicates BIOENG 1310)
     ENGR 0145 (duplicates BIOENG 1630)
     ENGR 1010 (duplicates BIOENG 1002 & 1150)
     MEMS 0051 (duplicates BIOENG 1210)
     ECE/CoE 1552 & MEMS 1014 (duplicates BIOENG 1320)

     Note: Students MAY NOT use any natural science course (ASTRON, BIOSC, CHEM, GEOL, NROSCI, PHYS) with a course number less than 0100 to satisfy the Advanced Engineering and Science requirement.

     Note: Students may use an ENGR study abroad experience, such as the MP3 program, either as an Advanced Engineering/Science elective or as a humanities/social science elective.

     Note: Students who successfully complete three co-op rotations can also apply that experience to satisfy one of the electives.

     

Dual Degrees, Minors and Certificates

      We encourage our students to take full advantage of University of Pittsburgh resources and educational opportunities.  Many of our students seek a dual degree that augments the bioengineering experience; sometimes another engineering degree, sometimes a degree in Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences.  Almost all obtain minors and certificates that add value to their education and distinguish them as they move forward in their careers.  Planning for minors and certificates needs to start as early as the sophomore year (perhaps, even, the freshman year)!

For more information on the bioengineering program, visit

http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/bioengineering/.

 

Bioengineering Undergraduate Curriculum
Sophomore Year

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 0085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1070 Introduction to Cell Biology I
3
BIOSCI 0050 Foundations of Biology Lab I
1
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials I
3
MATH 0240 Analytical Geometry and Calculus III
4
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
4
  *Bioengineering Concentration Elective
3
   
18

 

*Premed and Cellular Engineering Concentration students should take CHEM 0310-Organic Chemistry 1 for the Concentration Elective.


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 0085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1071 Introduction to Cell Biology II
3
BIOENG 1210 Bioengineering Thermodynamics
3
BIOENG 1310 Linear Systems and Electronics I
3
BIOENG 1630 Biomechanics I
3
ENGR 0020* Probability and Statistics for Engineers I or
4
  Concentration Elective (CHEM 0320 only)
3
     
16(15)

 

* Premed and Cellular Engineering Concentration Students should take CHEM 0320-Organic Chemistry II in the fourth term and ENGR 0020 in the sixth term.



Junior Year

 

FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 0085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1002* Intramural Internship
3
BIOENG 1220 Biotransport Phenomena
3
BIOENG 1320 Biological Signals and Systems
3
BIOSC 1250 Human Physiology
3
MATH 0280 Introduction to Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
BIOENG 1241* Soc, Pol, & Ethical Issues in Bioengr
3
18

 

* BIOENG 1002 may be taken Fall or Spring Term in the Junior or Senior year.



SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 0085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1150 Bioengineering Methods and Applications
3
BIOENG 1255 Dynamic Systems: A Physiological Perspective
4
  *Concentration Elective or
3
  ENGR 0020: Probability & Statistics
4
  Concentration Elective
3
  Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
16(17)

 

*Students who took CHEM 0320 in the fourth term must take ENG 0020.

 

Senior Year

 

SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 1085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1160 Bioengineering Design 1
3
Concentration Elective
3
Concentration Elective
3
Engineering Science Elective
3
  Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
15

 



EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
BIOENG 1085 Introduction to Bioengineering: Seminar
0
BIOENG 1161 Bioengineering Design 2
3
  Human/Social Science Elective
3
Concentration Elective
3
  Concentration Elective
3
  Engineering/Science Elective
3
15

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Chemical engineering is concerned with processes in which matter and energy undergo change. Despite the historically-inspired name, the material/energy transformations studies by chemical engineers include not only chemical, but also physical and biological changes. The range of concerns, therefore, is so broad that the chemical engineering graduate is prepared for a variety of interesting and challenging employment opportunities. The chemical engineer with his/her strong background in chemical, physical, and biological sciences is found in management, design, operations, and research. The chemical engineer is employed in almost all industries including food, polymers, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, petroleum, medical, materials, and electronics. Since solutions to energy, environmental, medical, and food problems (to name but a few) must surely involve material and/or energy transformations, there will be continued demands for chemical engineers in the future. The chemical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org


The major objectives of the chemical engineering program are that

  1. Graduates will gain employment in professional careers (often in positions of technical expertise in chemical engineering, but also including professions such as medicine, law, business, finance, non-profit organizations, government, education, etc.) and/or enroll in graduate studies.
  2. Graduates will be committed to lifelong learning throughout their careers.
  3. Graduates will assume positions of leadership.
  4. Graduates will recognize the importance of utilizing their knowledge, skills, and initiative for the benefit of society and demonstrate that understanding through their interactions within their community, in government, or in society as a whole.

The chemical engineering faculty have strong interests in transport phenomena, process dynamics, biotechnology, biomedical application, nanotechnology, kinetics, catalysis, thermodynamics, polymers, and energy supply and conversion. Petroleum engineering faculty interests are in fluid displacement in porous media and enhanced oil recovery and reservoir modeling. Courses and research opportunities are available in all of these areas for undergraduate students of demonstrated ability. For more information on these programs, contact che@engr.pitt.edu, or see http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/chemical

Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

Undergraduate chemical engineering courses cover thermodynamics; mass and energy balances; energy, mass, and momentum transfer; unit operations; process dynamics and control; process design; plant and product design; professional practice; and chemical reaction engineering.

In addition, the curriculum provides a sequence of technical electives that makes possible specialization in some of the most important areas in today’s society. Among these are the biochemical, petroleum, and polymers areas of concentration. Students may select any combination of technical electives. The appropriate selection of electives, however, can lead to a minor or area of concentration. (See Minors in Engineering.)

Students electing the petroleum engineering area of concentration would choose from a variety of classes including PETE 1160 Petroleum Reservoir Engineering, PETE 1202 Petroleum Drilling and Production, and PETE 1097 Special Projects among others.

A number of chemical engineering graduates find employment with firms that produce polymeric materials. Those interested in preparing for the area of concentration in polymers would select CHE 1754 Principles of Polymer Engineering, CHEM 1600 Synthesis and Characterization of Polymers (plus lab), and CHE 1097 Special Project (with polymer emphasis).

Students interested in an area of concentration in biochemical engineering should take BIOSCI 1000 Biochemistry, or CHE 0150 Biochemistry for Chemical Engineers as well as choose two courses from CHE 1531 Fundamentals of Biochemical Engineering and CHE 1532 Bioseparations, among others.

 

 

THIRD TERM   CREDITS

Chemistry 0310

Organic Chemistry

3

Chemistry 0330

Organic Chemistry Lab

1

Mathematics 0240

Calculus and Anal Geometry III

4

ChE 0100

Foundations of ChE

6

ChE 0101

Foundations Lab

1

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

    15


FOURTH TERM   CREDITS

Chemistry 0320

Organic Chemistry II

3

MATH 0290
(also MATH 1270)

Differential Equations

3

ChE 0200

ChE Thermodynamics

6

ChE 0201

Thermodynamics Lab

1

 

Composition Requirement

3

ChE 0214 Introduction to Chemical Product Design  

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

    16


FIFTH TERM   CREDITS

Engr 0020

Statistics

4

 

Humanities/Social Science

3

ChE 0300

Transport Phenomena

6

ChE 0301

Transport Phenomena Lab

1

ChE 0314

Taking Products to Market: The Next Step In Chemical Product Design

3 or 4

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

   

17

 



SIXTH TERM   CREDITS

Chemistry 1480

Intermediate Phys. Chemistry

3

 

Composition Requirement

3

ChE 0400

Reactive Processes

5

ChE 0401

Reactive Processes Lab

1

Suggestions: Engr 0022, Engr 0135, Engr 1700, Engr 1701, Engr 1702, Engr 1869

Engineering Elective

3

 

Humanities/Social Science

3

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

    18


SEVENTH TERM   CREDITS

Suggestions: Chem 0250, 1130, 1600
BIOSC 1500, 1940

Advanced Science

3

Suggestions: Chem 0260, Chem 0340, Chem 1430,

Chem 1605

Advanced Lab 1

ChE 0500

Systems Engineering I:
Dynamics and Modeling

5

ChE 0501

Systems Engineering Lab I

1

 

Humanities/Social Science

3

ChE 1530 or BIOSC 1000 Biochemistry 3

 

Technical Elective

3

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

    16


EIGHTH TERM   CREDITS

ChE 0613
 

System Engineering II: Process Design

4

ChE 0602

ChE Safety and Ethics

2

 

ChE or PETE Elective

3

 

Humanities/Social Science

3

 

Professional Elective

3

ChE 1085

Seminar

0

    15


TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED FOR BS DEGREE 131

 

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

Civil engineers are concerned with safeguarding life, health, and property while promoting the general welfare. They are the designers of the public and private works that affect large segments of the population. However, because problems of expanding population and increasing human needs confront our civilization, the responsibility of civil engineers extends beyond mere physical structures into the social, political, and economic welfare of this and other countries. In brief, the work of the civil engineer has a significant impact on the quality of life in all areas of modern society.

The civil engineer deals in environmental control and in the development or redevelopment of a geographic area through overall planning, as well as in the design, construction, and operation of structures and facilities for public and private use. This broad field of activity includes all types of structures for the following areas: buildings, bridges, and industrial installations; soil mechanics and foundations; transportation, including highways, traffic, airports, and harbors; hydraulic engineering, including irrigation; water resources, including power plants and dams; water supply; waste disposal; air pollution; hazardous and solid wastes; and environmental sanitation. Modern-day requirements have necessitated involvement in the medical and dental fields, oceanography, polar exploration, energy resources, and the space effort.

The major objectives of the civil engineering program are to

  • Prepare graduates to be successful engineering professionals and problem solvers;
  • Instill in graduates a desire to engage in lifelong learning; to pursue professional licensure; and to be professionally active; and
  • Provide access to an educational experience that will prepare graduates for success in the pursuit of advanced degrees.

The undergraduate program begins by providing study in the humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, and mathematics, and proceeds to the fundamental aspects of civil engineering. The curriculum focuses on the electives available for designing individualized programs suited to the student’s career goals. Emphasis is placed on societal needs and ways of meeting those needs. Thus, graduates are prepared to begin work in any of the several branches of civil engineering or to continue their education at the graduate level. The civil engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. http://www.abet.org.For more information on the civil and environmental engineering department, contact ceedept@pitt.edu or see http:// www.engineering.pitt.edu/civil/

Civil Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The civil engineering major program is designed for the students who enter the program at the end of their freshman year. Summer programs are available primarily to assist students who are not taking the structured curriculum on schedule or students participating in the cooperative study program. Students are expected to complete all prerequisite courses before advancing to the next term. Beginning with the seventh term, a student may elect to specialize in one of the following areas of concentration: environmental, geotechnical, structural, water resources, transportation or construction management.

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
ENGR 0020 Probability & Statistics for Engineering 1
4
ENGR 0131 Statics for Civil and Environmental Engineers
3
   
3
IE 1040 Engineering Economics Analysis
3
CEE 1503

Introduction to Environmental Engineering

3
CEE 0085 and CEE 1085 Sophomore and Departmental Seminars
      0
17


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0141 Mechanics of Materials of Civil and Environmental Engineers
3
CEE 0109 Computer Methods in Civil Engineering 1
3
CEE 1105 Materials of Construction
3
ECON 0100 Introduction to Microeconomic Theory
3
  Science Elective
3
CEE 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
18


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
CEE 1330 Introduction to Structural Analysis
3
CEE 1402 Fluid Mechanics
3
CEE 1811 Principles of Soil Mechanics
3
ENGR 0151 Dynamics for Civil and Environmental Engineers
3
  Social Science Elective
3
CEE 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
CEE 1200 Construction Management
3
CEE 1209, 1210, 1211, 1217 OR 1218 Sustainability Course
3
CEE 1412 Hydrology & Water Resources
3
CEE 1703 Transportation Engineering
3
CEE Design Elective*
3
CEE 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
CEE Design Elective *
3
CEE Design Elective *
3
CEE Design Elective *
3
Engineering Elective
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
CEE 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
15


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
CEE 1233, 1333, 1433, 1533, 1733, or 1833 Senior Design Project
3
CEE Elective **
3
CEE Elective **
3
CEE Elective **
3
CEE 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
 
15

 


*Design Electives are: (CEE 1340 or 1341), (1410, 1401 or 2405), (1505, 1513 or 1515), (1714, 1715, 1821 or 1814). One course from each group is required.

**Any non-required CEE undergraduate courses, Mining Engineering Courses with the ENGR classification, 2000 level CEE graduate courses  and any ENGR course offered by the CEE Department are suitable for CEE Electives.

COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Computer engineers are active in and in demand for all phases of technology research, design and development, testing, manufacturing, sales, and management of computer technologies. In addition, many successful leaders in other professions, such as law, medicine, and business, pursue an undergraduate education in computer engineering as preparation for later professional study. Thus the undergraduate curriculum provides preparation in both mathematics and physical sciences, coupled with coverage of all aspects of computing, software, hardware, design, and application. The program's flexible elective structure offers the student  considerable opportunity for professional specialization, area specialization within the computing discipline, or interdisciplinary broadening. The computer engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. http://www.abet.org. For more information about the program, contact compengr@engr.pitt.edu or see http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/

Computer Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The sophomore year (terms three and four) starts the student’s specialization with courses in intermediate programming; data structures; analysis and design of circuits, digital logic; computer organization and program hallmark, 3 credit digital systems laboratory experience.  These courses are coupled with mathematical courses in linear algebra and differential equations; and electives in the humanities, social sciences, and communication skills. The junior year (terms five and six) further develops the student’s knowledge in the practical foundations of computer engineering with courses in algorithm design, computer architecture, systems software, and a second program hallmark, 3 credit advanced digital laboratory. These are complemented with courses in probability and statistics, as well as with electives in the humanities and social sciences. The senior year (terms seven and eight) continues the foundation sequence with software engineering and then extends the student’s experience with both technical and design electives in computer engineering. The rich set of electives available from computer engineering, computer science, and electrical engineering provides the student with exposure to several of the many subdisciplines within the field.

The culmination of the student’s program is the Senior Design experience, in which the student initiates and completes a significant design project. In addition, each term students participate in the undergraduate seminar, each term seminar address professional and career development, issues of team-building, ethics, life-long learning.  Further the seminar is a conduit to enrichment of the college experience through interdisciplinary programs and certificates, cooperative education and internships, and study abroad opportunities. All undergraduate students are required to use computers and computer software in project work and in homework assignments and to support this, several undergraduate laboratories are provided with workstations and software dedicated for these purposes.

 

The overall objective of the computer engineering program is to prepare individuals to be prepared, confident and successful in whatever path they choose to pursue in the 21st century global economy. This includes those who move into practice within the computer engineering discipline either through employment in industry or government, or through a start-up of their own, those who move on to advanced graduate level study and research in computing or other professions such as law, business, or medicine.

As indicated, the program has considerable elective flexibility. Many computer engineering students consider a minor or second major in another discipline to supplement their major program studies.  Courses from a minor or secondary major do count toward computer engineering program elective requirements. The humanities and social science electives must be selected from the list of acceptable courses compiled by the Swanson School of Engineering. Each of the two open elective may be satisfied by any University course, including clusters of single credit courses in areas such as music, art, Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC), 3 rotations of co-operative education, physical education, etc., totaling 3 credits. Technical electives may include computer engineering; electrical engineering; computer science; or other engineering, mathematics, or basic science courses.

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
COE0401 Intermediate Programming Using Java
4

COE0132

Digital Logic
3
COE0031 Linear Circuits and Systems 1
3
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 3
      3
COE 1885 Departmental Seminar  
16


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
COE/CS 0445 Data Structures
3
COE 0147 or Computer Organization
COE/0447 Computer Organization and Assembly Language
3
COE 0501 Digital Systems Lab
3
COE 0257 Analysis and Design of Electronic Circuits
3
Communications Skills Elective
      3
COE 1885 Departmental Seminar  
15


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
COE 1541 Computer Architecture
3
ENGR 0020 Probability and Statistics for Engineers 1
4
COE 1502 Advanced Digital Design Concepts
3
MATH 0280 Linear Algebra
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 4
      3
COE 1885 Departmental Seminar  
16


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
COE 0449 Systems Software
3
COE 1501 Algorithm Implementations
3
COE/ECE/CS Advanced Elective 1
3
  Technical Elective 1
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 5
3
COE 1885 Department Seminar  
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
COE/ECE/CS Advanced Elective 2
3
Technical Elective 2
3
COE 1186 or
COE 1530 Software Engineering
4
COE/ECE/CS Advanced Elective 3
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 6
3
COE 1885 Department Seminar  
16


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
COE Design Elective
3
COE/ECE/CS Advanced Elective 4
3
Technical Elective3
3
Open Elective
3
Open Elective
      3
COE 1885 Departmental Seminar  
15

 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Electrical engineers are involved in research, design, development, testing, manufacturing, sales, and management of electrical systems and devices, such as televisions, wireless telephone systems, computers and computer networks, patient monitoring equipment, and power generation and distribution systems. Many successful leaders in professions such as law, medicine, and business have used an undergraduate education in electrical engineering as preparation for later professional study. The undergraduate curriculum includes required courses in the basic electrical and physical sciences as well as electives that provide the student an opportunity to choose professional specialization or interdisciplinary breadth. The curriculum also includes elective courses in the humanities and social sciences to provide a balanced, liberal education so that the graduate may participate creatively in society and become both an educated and effective citizen.

During the sophomore year, electrical engineering students take courses in calculus, matrix theory, differential equations, and communication skills. There are also required electrical engineering courses in linear circuits and systems, digital logic, computer organization, electronics, and an introductory lab. In the junior year, students have required courses in signals and systems, electromagnetics, semiconductor electronics, laboratories in signal processing and electronic circuit design, and two elective courses. During the senior year, students takes only electives, including electrical engineering (EE) electives, selected from more than 25 offerings. The culmination of the student’s curriculum is the Senior Design elective, in which the student initiates and completes a significant design project. Each term students take the undergraduate seminar, which addresses professional issues and career opportunities. All undergraduate students are required to use computers and computer software in project work and in homework assignments.

Non-EE elective courses in the undergraduate program include humanities and social science electives, a communication skills course, an open elective, and technical electives. The humanities and social science electives must be selected from the list of acceptable electives compiled by the school. The communications skills elective is also chosen from a list available on the department web site. The open elective may be satisfied by taking a course that is acceptable for any other elective course category, or by using (for example) 3 credits of band, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC), 3 rotations of co-operative education or chorus. Technical electives may include electrical engineering electives, courses in other engineering disciplines, mathematics courses, or basic science courses. The electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. http://www. abet.org. For more information on the program, visit our website or contact eedept@ee.pitt.edu.

The overall objective of the EE program is for our graduates to be successful professionals in the diverse, global environment of the 21st century. This entails the ability to adapt to new and shifting technologies, in whatever career path they choose to pursue. This includes careers in electrical engineering through employment in industry, government or private practice, as well as careers in other engineering or professional disciplines such as bioengineering, computer engineering, business, law, or medicine. Our graduates can also pursue advanced study in electrical engineering or other engineering or professional fields and be able to serve in leadership positions in academia, industry or government.

 

Specialization and Interdisciplinary Studies

Specialization is readily available for students with specific career goals. To facilitate specialization, optional areas of concentration have been defined to allow a student to develop strength in a particular area of interest. Areas of concentration that are currently available include computers, electronics, telecommunications/signal processing and power. Requirements for the areas of concentration are met by proper selection of design and other elective courses. Students may take some courses in an area of concentration without completing all of the requirements.

For students interested in interdisciplinary studies, special programs can be arranged using the elective structure that exists within the regular electrical engineering curriculum. Formal interdisciplinary programs have been developed through minors offered by other engineering departments. Students may use electives to satisfy both EE and minor requirements.

Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ECE 0031 Linear Circuits and Systems 1
3
ECE 0132 Digital Logic
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
Humanities/Social Science Elective 3
3
Communications Skills Elective
      3
15


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
  Technical Electric 1
3
ECE 0142 Computer Organization
3
ECE 0501 Digital Laboratory
3
ECE 0257 Analysis and Design of Electronic Circuits
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
16


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
ECE 1247 Semiconductor Device Theory
3
ECE 1201 Electronic Measurements and Circuits
Laboratory
3
ECE 1552 Signals and Systems Analysis
3
ECE 1259 Electromagnetics 1
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 4
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
ECE 1212 Electronic Circuit Design Lab
3
ECE 1563 Signal Processing Laboratory
3
MATH 0280 Linear Algebra
3
  Technical Elective 2
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 5
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
ECE Design Elective
3
ECE Elective 1
3
ECE Elective 2
3
Technical Elective 3
3
ENGR 0020 Probability and Statistics for Engineers
4
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
      0
16


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
ECE Elective 3
3
ECE Elective 4
3
Technical Elective 4
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 6
3
Open Elective
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
15

 

Each student must complete at least four ECE elective courses from the following list. There are additional special topics courses offered to address changes in technology.

 

ECE 1150 Introduction to Computer Networks
ECE 1160 Introduction to Embedded System Design
ECE 1161 Embedded Systems II
ECE 1180 Computational Modeling and Simulation for Engineers
ECE 1186 Software Engineering with Java
ECE 1192 Introduction to VLSI Design
ECE 1232 Introduction to Lasers and Optical Electronics
ECE 1236 Electronic Design with Integrated Circuits
ECE 1238 Digital Electronics
ECE 1266 Applications of Fields and Waves
ECE 1286 Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits
ECE 1390 Introduction to Image Processing/Computer Vision
ECE 1472 Analog Communication Systems
ECE 1473 Digital Communication Systems
ECE 1562 Digital and Analog Filters
ECE 1673 Linear Control Systems
ECE 1700 Construction and Cost of Electrical Supply
ECE 1710 Electrical Distribution Engineering and Smart Grids
ECE 1769 Power Systems Analysis 1
ECE 1771 Electric Machinery
ECE 1773 Power Generation, Operation, and Control

 

Each student must complete at least one ECE design elective from the following list.

 

ECE 1161 Embedded Computer System Design
ECE 1193 Advanced VLSI Design
ECE 1896 Senior Design Project
ENGR 1050 Product Realization (with approval)

 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

The Engineering Science Program is designed for students who have a strong interest in science and mathematics as well as a desire to acquire the skills and perspective of engineering.  The Engineering Science Program offers flexible curricula in several interdisciplinary areas of concentration.  The program is built on sequences of courses from multiple science and engineering programs. All areas of concentration combine in-depth exposure to both science and engineering.  All areas of concentration include a two-term capstone design experience.  The overall goal of the program is to develop each student’s ability to think analytically across disciplines and develop a knowledge base well suited to tackle future technical challenges that will require a thorough understanding of a discipline in the physical sciences and/or mathematics combined with engineering.  Interested students are encouraged to pursue the Engineering Science degree jointly with the University Honors College (UHC) by completing the requirements for Engineering Science and satisfying the special degree requirements of the UHC.  The Engineering Science program is ideal preparation for graduate school in a wide range of disciplines, for rewarding careers in industry, and is an excellent background for those who wish to pursue careers in other professions, such as management, law, education, or medicine.

NOTE:  The Engineering Physics curriculum (which had been available as a separate Engineering Physics Program until 2010) is now an area of concentration within Engineering Science. 

The program objectives for Engineering Science are to produce engineers who build successful, diverse careers based on:

  • an understanding of the physical/life sciences, engineering analysis and design, and interdisciplinary problem solving;
  • a commitment to ongoing professional development as exemplified by, for example, graduate study, training, conference participation, and certification;
  • advancement and leadership in professional and/or community life.

For more information on the program, contact undrmems@pitt.edu or see http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/ESCI/What_is_Engineering_Science_/

 

Engineering Science Undergraduate Curriculum

The Engineering Science Program currently offers three areas of concentration:  Engineering Physics, Nanotechnology, and Nuclear Energy.

Engineering Physics prepares students for engineering practice based on a curriculum designed to develop an understanding of physics and its application in electrical engineering and materials science through classroom instruction and hands-on laboratory experience.  The core of the curriculum is comprised of a sequence of fundamental courses in modern physics, electricity and magnetism of materials, design of electronic circuits, semiconductor devices, and signal processing.  The curriculum culminates with program electives and a two-term Senior Design sequence.  The design project builds on the knowledge gained in coursework and emphasizes independent and team problem solving under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

Area of Concentration: Engineering Physics Sample Curriculum

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ECE 0031 Linear Circuits and Systems 1
3
PHYS 0219 Basic Laboratory Physics for Science and Engineering
2
  Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ECE 0041 Linear Circuits and Systems 2
3
ECE 0257 Analysis and Design of Electronic Circuits
3
EE 1201 Electronic Measurements and Circuits Laboratory
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1053 Structures of Crystals & Diffraction
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials
3
PHYS 0477 Thermal Phys., Rel. & QM
4
  Upper Level Physics
3
  Upper Level Physics
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16

SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1063 Ph Transf & Micro Evol
3
ECE 1247 Semiconductor Device Theory
3
ECE 1552 Signals and Systems Analysis
3
PHYS 0481 Principles of Modern Physics 2
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1058 Electromagnetic Properties of Materials
3
ECE 1266 Applications of Fields and Waves
3
  Senior Design 1
3
P Upper Level Physics
3
  Program Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
  Upper Level Mathematics
3
ECE 1212 Electronic Circuit Design Laboratory
3
  Senior Design 2
3
Program Elective
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

1 or PHYS 1341
2 or MEMS 1010, MEMS 1057, MEMS 1070

Senior Design: at least one senior design course offered by one of the other SSOE engineering programs is required; the second course may be a senior project arranged with a faculty mentor and taken as ENGSCI 1801.  Students wishing to complete a two-term project with a faculty mentor may request approval for the second term to count as a program elective (ENGSCI 1802

Upper Level Physics: Physics courses with course numbers > 1000

Upper Level Mathematics: Mathematics courses with course numbers> 1000
131 total credits
51 credits minimum of Engineering, 53 credits minimum of Math/Science

Nanotechnology prepares students for engineering practice based on a curriculum designed to develop an understanding of the effect of nanoscale dimensions on the physical behavior of materials, systems, and devices (nanocharacterization and nanometrology), as well as knowledge of processes used to fabricate useful nanoscale materials, systems, and devices (nanomanufacturing).  Students take courses in modern physics or chemistry, materials engineering or bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanoscience, fabrication and design in nanotechnology and the materials science of nanostructures.  The curriculum culminates with program electives and a two-term Senior Design sequence.  Senior Design builds on the knowledge gained in coursework and emphasizes independent and team problem solving under the guidance of a faculty mentor.  Nanotechnology has two curricular options, one emphasizing Physics and Materials Science and the other Chemistry and Bioengineering.

Area of Concentration:  Nanotechnology Sample Curriculum for Chemistry/Bioengineering Emphasis

 

 

  THIRD TERM  CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
CHEM 1 Core Chemistry Course
3
LIFESCI 1 Basic Life Science
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structure & Properties
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
16

 

 

          

 

  FOURTH TERM  CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
CHEM 2 Core Chemistry course
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
LIFESCI 2 Basic Life Science
3
BIOENG 1 Core Bioengineering course
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
15

 

 

  FIFTH TERM CREDITS 
ENGR 0240 Introduction to Nanotechnology & Nanoengineering
3
BIOENG 2 Core bioengineering course
3
MEMS 1010 Exp. Methods in MSE
3
MEMS 1053 Structures of Crystals & Diffraction
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 1  
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
3
   
18

 

 

  SIXTH TERM  CREDITS
ENGR 0241 Fabrication & Design in Nanotechnology
3
  H/SS Elective 3
3
CHEM 3 Core chemistry course
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 2
3
  H/SS Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
15

 

 

SEVENTH TERM CREDITS
ENGR 0020 Probability & Statistics
4
  Nanotechnology Elective 3
3
  Senior Design 1
3
MEMS 1057 Micro/Nano Manufacturing
3
  H/SS  Elective 5
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
16

 

 

  EIGHTH TERM  CREDITS
  Senior Design 2
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 4
3
MATH 1560* Complex Variables & Applications
3
MEMS 1063 Phase Transformations & Microstructure Evolutions
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 4
3
  H/SS Elective 6
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
   
18

 

Senior Design: at least one senior design course offered by one of the other SSOE engineering programs is required; the second course may be a senior project arranged with a faculty mentor and taken as ENGSCI 1801.  Students wishing to complete a two-term project with a faculty mentor may request approval for the second term to count as a program elective (ENGSCI 1802).

*or MATH 1560

Classes in red constitute a minor in Bioengineering if the student also takes BIOENG 1085 Seminar

Classes in green constitute a minor in Chemistry if students add two 1-cr Chemistry Lab courses

129 Total Credits

49 credits minimum of Engineering, 50 credits minimum of Math/Science

Area of Concentration: Nanotechnology
Sample Curriclum for Physics/Materials Emphasis

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ECE 0031 Linear Circuits and Systems 1
3
PHYS 0219 Thermal Phys. Rel. & QM
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structure & Properties
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16

 

 

FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ECE 0257 Anal. & Des. Electrical Circuits
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
PHYS 0481 Principles of Modern Physics 2
3
ECE 0041 Linear Circuits & Systems 2
3
MEMS 1085 Departmental Seminar
      0
15

 

FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
ENGR 0240 Introduction to Nanotechnology & Nanoengineering
3
  Upper Level Physics
3
MEMS 1010 Exp. Methods in MSE
3
MEMS 1053 Structures of Crystals & Diffraction
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials
3
Nanotechnology Elective 1
3
ECE 1885 Departmental Seminar
0
18

 

SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
ENGR 0241 Fabrication & Design in Nanotechnology
3
MEMS 1063 Phase Transformation & Microstructure Evolution
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 2
3
  H/SS Elective 3
3
  H/SS Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
ENGR 0020 Probability & Statistics
4
  Nanotechnology Elective 3
3
  Senior Design 1
3
MEMS 1057 Micro/Nano Manufacturing
3
  H/SS Elective 5
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16

 

EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
  Senior Design 2
3
  Nanotechnology Elective 4
3
  Upper Level Mathematics
3
Upper Level Physics
3
  H/SS Elective 6
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

Upper Level Physics: Physics courses with course numbers > 1000

Upper Level Mathematics: Mathematics courses with course numbers > 1000

* at least one senior design course offered by one of the other SSOE engineering programs is required; the second course may be a senior project arranged with a faculty mentor and taken as ENGSCI 1801.  Students wishing to complete a two-term project with a faculty mentor may request approval for the second term to count as a program elective (ENGSCI 1802).

courses in red constitute a minor in Physics if students add PHYS 0219 (2 cr) – Lab. Phys. for Sci. & Eng.

130 total credits

52 credits minimum of Engineering, 48 credits minimum of Math/Science

Area of concentration: Nuclear Energy
Sample Curriculum
 
THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures & Properties
3
ENGR  0135 Statistics & Mechnics of Materials 1
3
  H/SS Elective 3
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16

 

FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0145 Statistics & Mechanics of Materials 2
3
MEMS 0031/ECE 0031 Linar Circuits & Systems 1
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
MEMS 1015 Rigid-Body Dynamics
3
  H/SS Elective 4
     3
MEMS 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
18
FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1053 Heat and Mass Transfer
3
ENGR 1700 Intro to Nuclear Engineering
3
PHYS 0477 Thermal Phys. Rel. & QM
3
PHYS 1351 Intermediate Elec. & Magnetism
3
MATH 1470 Partial Differential Equations
3
MEMS 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15

 

SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 0071 Into to Fluid Dynamics
3
ENGR 1701 Foundations of Nuclear Reactors
3
PHYS 0481 Principles of Modern Physics 2
3
ECE 0041 Linear Circuits & Systems 2
3
  H/SS Elective 5
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
  Senior Design 1
3
ENGR 1702 Nuclear Plan Technology
3
  Program Elective 1
3
  Program Elective 2
3
  H/SS Elective 6
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
  Senior Design 2
3
MEMS 1071 Applied Fluid Dynamics
3
BIOE 1330 Biomedical Imaging
3
Program Elective 3
3
  Program Elective 4
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

* at least one senior design course offered by one of the other SSOE engineering programs is required; the second course may be a senior project arranged with a faculty mentor and taken as ENGSCI 1801.  Students wishing to complete a two-term project with a faculty mentor may request approval for the second term to count as a program elective (ENGSCI 1802).

 

Program Electives (12 credits)

To earn a B.S. in Engineering Science with a concentration in Nuclear Energy students take an additional 12 credits of Program Electives in addition to the required courses.  The 12 credits must include an area of emphasis consisting of at least 6 credits of interrelated courses demonstrating depth of knowledge.  At least 6 of the 12 program elective credits must be in Engineering, Science, or Math.  Potential 2-course areas of emphasis are listed below but sequences in foreign languages and culture, economics, business, and other areas can be approved by the ESCI program director. 

Potential areas of emphasis: 

    • Nuclear Engineering – graduate nuclear engineering courses
    • Civil and Environmental Engineering – Structural, Water Resources, Construction Management & Sustainability, Environmental Engineering
    • Bioengineering – Biosignals and Imaging
    • Electrical Engineering – Power
    • Industrial Engineering – Engineering Management
    • Mechanical Engineering – Dynamic Systems, Solid Mechanics
    • Material Science & Engineering
    • Physics
    • Mathematics – Numerical methods and Analysis

  

Alternatively the student may fulfill the elective requirement by earning a certificate (besides the Nuclear Engineering Certificate) offered by the SSOE:

    • Energy Resource Utilization
    • Fessenden Honors Engineering
    • International Engineering Studies
    • Product Realization
    • Sustainable Engineering

 

 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Industrial Engineering (IE) is all about choices. It is the engineering discipline that offers the most wide-ranging array of opportunities in terms of employment, and it is distinguished by its flexibility. While other engineering disciplines tend to apply skills to specific areas, industrial engineers may be found working everywhere from traditional manufacturing companies to airlines, distribution companies to financial institutions, hospitals to consulting companies, high-tech corporations to luxury retailers. Engineers are educated to design and build things, but IEs are educated to design and improve the productivity and quality of integrated systems of people, material, computers, information, equipment, and other resources. IEs draw upon the specialized knowledge and skills in the mathematical, physical and social sciences together with the principles, methods and modeling tools of engineering analysis to make improvements in business processes. In addition to making significant contributions to corporate profitability, they also make the workplace a more productive and streamlined environment. The Department of Industrial Engineering meets the challenge of the growing complexity of modern industry through an intensive educational program that includes a required international component. Building upon a solid foundation in the basic sciences, engineering, and computers, the curriculum provides the student with a capability for systems analysis and design that crosses traditional disciplinary lines and an awareness of and concern for the demands of today's dynamic social systems. The industrial engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

 

Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The objectives of our undergraduate program are for our graduates to be:

  • Successful professionals, who adapt to changes in technology and our global society in their desired career path, including industrial engineering based careers, as well as other professional disciplines;
  • Lifelong learners and pursuers of advanced knowledge;
  • Active leaders in their profession and/or community.

The IE faculty has committed itself to the broad, multidisciplinary approach needed to solve problems in today's organizations. In addition to core courses in industrial engineering, you will be exposed to the humanities and social sciences with a global focus and have the opportunity to select four technical electives. These technical electives may be chosen from specialized and advanced offerings of the industrial engineering department. In consultation with your advisor, up to two of these electives may be selected from other programs in the University such as other engineering departments, the sciences, mathematics, economics, business, computer science, or information science.

Recognizing that engineering is an increasingly global profession, the undergraduate program is also committed to providing its graduates with the skills they need to compete on an international basis. Such skills will enable Pitt IE graduates to not only have a distinct employment advantage, but will also provide them with a cross-cultural awareness that will enhance their leadership abilities. This commitment is emphasized through an international requirement for all of our undergraduates for which students are expected to complete an international experience, or, in some cases select an integrated set of humanities and social sciences courses with a global focus. The final term of our undergraduate program includes a capstone senior design course in which you, working in small teams with other students, will complete a semester long project in a corporate setting. These projects are sponsored by local industry through our Sponsor An Industrial Engineering Team (SAINT) program, jointly supervised by an individual from the company and an IE faculty member.

For more information on the industrial engineering program contact ugradie@pitt.edu or www.engineering.pitt.edu/industrial

 

THIRD TERM CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 3
4
IE 1040 Engineering Economic Analysis
3
IE 1054 Productivity Analysis
3
IE 1070 Probability Random Variables, and Distributions
3
ENGR 0022 Material Structures and Properties
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
16


FOURTH TERM CREDITS
MATH 0280 Intro to Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
IE 0015 Intro to Information Systems Engineering
3
IE 1052 Manufacturing Processes & Analysis
3
IE 1071 Statistical Testing and Regression
3
  Focused Elective (see approved list)
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
IE 1051 Engineering Product Design
3
IE 1061 Human Factors Engineering
3
IE 1081 Operations Research
3
ENGR 1869 Intro to EEs for Non EEs
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1035 Engineering Management
3
IE 1055 Facility Layout and Material Handling
3
IE 1082 Probabilistic Methods in Operations
Research
3
IE 1083 Discrete Event Simulation
3
  Humanities/Social Science Elective 3
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1080 Supply Chain Management
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
Technical Elective 1
3
Technical Elective 2
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 4
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
15


EIGHTH TERM CREDITS
IE 1090 Senior Projects
4
  Humanities/Social Science Elective 5
3
Humanities/Social Science Elective 6
3
Technical Elective 3
3
Technical Elective 4
3
IE 1085 Departmental Seminar
0
16

 

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Materials limitations often impede technological and social progress. The materials engineer applies special knowledge of the structure, behavior, and properties of materials to solve these engineering problems. The engineer may be concerned with developing and improving processes for producing metals and alloys or ceramics; developing new alloys or improving existing alloys; and/or achieving better use of alloys and other materials. New materials must be designed for a variety of functions, including structural, esthetic, electrical, or magnetic and operating environments. Materials may come in forms so minute that the work is done under a microscope or in forms so large that special handling cranes are required.

Research efforts in the department involve work on the development of new high-strength steels, corrosion and oxidation, structural and electronic ceramics, smart materials, high-temperature materials, plastic deformation, phase transformations, and strengthening mechanisms. A number of graduate students are engaged in thesis research on these topics, and undergraduates are encouraged to work on related senior projects. The materials science and engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http:// www.abet.org. For more information on the program, contact undrmems@engr.pitt.edu or see http:// www.engineering.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/Materials_Science_and _Engineering_Curriculum/.

Materials Science and Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The undergraduate program is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the structure and properties of materials, the principles underlying the processing of materials, and the concepts of engineering design and problem solving. Both theory and practice are emphasized. Laboratory experiences are integrated into the curriculum, and a variety of professional and engineering science electives are available. When desirable, specialized programs can be arranged for the students with well-defined interests and goals. Students are prepared to accept positions in production, research, and management, in both the basic materials and advanced or high-tech materials industries. This versatile education is a strong preparation for graduate work in metallurgy and materials and other related fields.

The major objectives of the materials science and engineering program are to

  • Prepare students to assume positions of technical leadership in industries that require their specialized knowledge of materials science and engineering.
  • Provide students with an education, grounded in the fundamentals, enabling them to succeed in graduate studies and research in materials science and engineering.
  • Encourage students to remain committed and engaged in the discipline of materials science and engineering throughout their careers.
  • Provide students with a comprehensive education in engineering science that will prepare them to succeed in management positions in industry or other professional careers (e.g. teaching, law, etc.).

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
MEMS 0024 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0145 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 2
3
MEMS 0031 Electrical Circuits
3
MEMS 0040 Materials and Manufacturing
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
  Communication Skills Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1010 Experimental Methods in MSE
3
MEMS 1052 Heat and Mass Transfer
3
MEMS 1053 Structure of Crystals and Diffraction
3
MEMS 1058 Electromagnetic Properties of Material
3
MEMS 1059 Phase Equilibria in Multicomponent Materials
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1011 Structure and Properties Laboratory
2
MEMS 1028 Mechanical Design 1
3
MEMS 1063 Phase Transformation and Evolution
3
MEMS 1070 Mechanical Behavior of Materials
3
  MSE Technical Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
14


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
ENGR 0020 Probability and Statistics
4
MEMS 1030 Material Selection
3
MEMS 1079 Senior Materials Research Project
3
  MSE Technical Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1043 Senior Design Project
3
MSE Technical Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

Concentration in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy for Undergraduate Students

The concentration program of study in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy is offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science.  This concentration is available as an option for all undergraduate engineering students pursuing the BS degree in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering or engineering physics. Four courses (12 credits) are required to complete the concentration.

The goal of this concentration is to provide a strong educational and training program focused on the use of physical metallurgy, advanced alloy design philosophies and modern thermomechanical processing strategies for the enhanced design and manufacture of high-performance steels.

Requirements

To obtain a background in ferrous physical metallurgy, the following four courses are required:

  1. MEMS 1010 – Experimental Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
  2. MEMS 1101 – Advanced Physical Metallurgy
  3. MEMS 1102 – Principles and Applications of Steel Design
  4. MEMS 1103 – Principles and Applications of Steel Processing Design

Enrollment

Students considering enrolling in the ferrous physical metallurgy concentration area are encouraged to declare during their sophomore year.  Interested students may wish to speak with Dr. Anthony DeArdo (deardo@engr.pitt.edu) or Dr. Isaac Garcia (Garcia@engr.pitt.edu) for more information.

 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mechanical engineering is concerned with both energy use and the design of machines and systems in such sectors as transportation, manufacturing, materials handling, power generation, and environmental control. Mechanical engineers are involved in design, development, research, management, and related activities in these fields. The breadth and diversity of the profession requires an undergraduate curriculum that provides a sound foundation in the basic sciences, computational skills including use of computers, and the fundamentals of engineering and engineering design. This curriculum provides a base for future professional growth and is also an excellent background for those who wish to pursue careers in other professions including management, law, or medicine. The mechanical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET< http://www.abet.org. For more information on the program, contact pittmems@engr.pitt.edu or see http://www.engr.pitt.edu/MEMS/Undergraduate/Mechanical_Engineering_Curriculum/.

 

Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Curriculum

In the first two years, the mechanical engineering curriculum concentrates on the fundamentals of sciences, mathematics, and engineering. The last two years provide increased depth in the engineering sciences, including fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and systems analysis and also provide exposure to engineering applications, such as mechanical measurements, manufacturing, mechanical design, and thermal systems. Sufficient technical electives are allowed to permit each student to explore areas of special interest.

Course work in the social sciences and humanities is included for the enhancement of the student’s awareness of the importance of social, political, and economic problems in the practice of engineering. Where appropriate, the upper-level courses introduce consideration of human values, social benefits, and constraints to prepare future practicing engineers to be responsive to such concerns.

The major objectives of the program are to:

  • Demonstrate successful application of mechanical engineering knowledge and skills for industry, public sector organizations or their profession.
  • Pursue life-long learning through advanced professional degrees, graduate studies in engineering, professional training or engineering certification.
  • Demonstrate professional and intellectual growth as leaders in their profession and/or community.

 

THIRD TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0240 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3
4
MATH 0280 Matrices and Linear Algebra
3
ENGR 0022 Materials Structures and Properties
3
ENGR 0135 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1
3
MEMS 0024 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
16


FOURTH TERM
CREDITS
MATH 0290 Differential Equations
3
ENGR 0145 Statics and Mechanics of Materials 2
3
MEMS 0031 Electrical Circuits
3
MEMS 0040 Materials and Manufacturing
3
MEMS 0051 Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
Communication Skills Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
18


FIFTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 0071 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
3
MEMS 1014 Dynamic Systems
3
MEMS 1028 Mechanical Design 1
3
Engineering Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SIXTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1015 Rigid-Body Dynamics
3
MEMS 1029 Mechanical Design 2
3
MEMS 1041 Mechanical Measurements 1
3
MEMS 1051 Applied Thermodynamics
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


SEVENTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1042 Mechanical Measurements 2
3
MEMS 1052 Heat & Mass Transfer
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  Dynamic Systems Elective
3
Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15


EIGHTH TERM
CREDITS
MEMS 1043 Senior Design Project
3
MEMS 1071 Applied Fluid Mechanics
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  ME Technical Elective
3
  Humanity/Social Science Elective
3
MEMS 1085 Department Seminar
0
15

 

Concentration in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy for Undergraduate Students

The concentration program of study in Ferrous Physical Metallurgy is offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science.  This concentration available as an option for all undergraduate engineering students pursuing the BS degree in materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering or engineering physics. Four courses (12 credits) are required to complete the concentration.

The goal of this concentration is to provide a strong educational and training program focused on the use of physical metallurgy, advanced alloy design philosophies and modern thermomechanical processing strategies for the enhanced design and manufacture of high-performance steels.

Requirements

To obtain a background in ferrous physical metallurgy, the following four courses are required:

  1. MEMS 1010 – Experimental Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
  2. MEMS 1101 – Advanced Physical Metallurgy
  3. MEMS 1102 – Principles and Applications of Steel Design
  4. MEMS 1103 – Principles and Applications of Steel Processing Design

Enrollment

Students considering enrolling in the ferrous physical metallurgy concentration area are encouraged to declare during their sophomore year.  Interested students may wish to speak with Dr. Anthony DeArdo (deardo@engr.pitt.edu) or Dr. Isaac Garcia (Garcia@engr.pitt.edu) for more information.