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Course Description

Note: (QR) denotes quantitative reasoning courses.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RELGST)

 

 

RELGST 0111 HEBREW SCRIPTURE & CHRISTIAN OLD TESTAMENT
3 cr.
An examination of this body of literature that two major religions claim as their scriptures. The course includes study of the ancient composition and collection of the documents as well as the two major theological systems built upon them. Cross-listed as HIST 0111.

RELGST 0753 ORIGINS OF CHRISTIANITY
3 cr.
An examination of the diverse strands of Christianity as developed both in the Christian Bible and outside  of it. Cross-listed as HIST 0753.

RELGST 1011 RELIGION AND EARLY AMERICA
3 cr.
This course examines the role that various religious traditions, Western Christianity, Judaism, Native Americans, and Africans played in creating an American religious tradition in the Colonial period.

RELGST 1602 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD
3 cr.
A seminar that examines the origins, identities, and theological conceptions of the major non-Judeo/Christian religious traditions. The course of study includes the scriptures, cultural contexts, and worship practices of these religions as well as the intimate relationship of religion to other aspects of human behavior.
 
RELGST 1774 HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY
3 cr.
An examination of the foundations of Christianity in Roman times and its worldwide diffusion up to the present. The emergence of differing Christian identities, the experiences of Christians in various societies, and the role of Christianity in significant social and political developments in the West are emphasized

 

 

RESPIRATORY CARE (RESCA)

Pitt-Johnstown’s Respiratory Care program provides classroom and up-to-date clinical education as required by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care, 1248 Harwood Road, Bedford, TX  76021-4244, (817) 283-2835, http://www.coarc.com.

 

RESCA 0020 INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY CARE TECHNIQUES 1
3 cr.
This course introduces the student to medical terminology, basic patient care, vital signs assessment, and patient communication. An introductory clinical tour is included during this course. In addition, gas laws as they apply to pulmonary physiology and medical gas therapy will be covered.

RESCA 1022 RESPIRATORY PHARMACOLOGY
2 cr.
This course reviews drug classification and autonomic responses to medications. Emphasis is placed on drugs delivered by the respiratory care practitioner with consideration given to analgesics, antibiotics, steroids, cardiovascular drugs, and drugs used in anesthesia. Prerequisites:BIOL 0950 and CHEM 0190, and RESCA 0020.

RESCA 1024 RESPIRATORY CARE TECHNIQUES 2
4 cr.
Introduces the student to medical gas administration and the modalities of therapy, including aerosol and humidity therapy, chest physiotherapy, incentive spirometry, intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB), suctioning techniques, and sterilization of equipment. Prerequisites: RESCA 0020 and 1022 and 1026 and 1028 and 1041.

RESCA 1026 RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGY
3 cr.
This course elaborates on the function of the pulmonary system and its interrelationship with cardiovascular function. Topics include ventilatory mechanics, gas diffusion, oxygen/carbon dioxide transport, pulmonary circulation, fetal pulmonary development, and arterial blood gas relationships. Prerequisites: BIOL 0950 and CHEM 0190 and RESCA 0020.

RESCA 1028 RESPIRATORY PATHOLOGY
3 cr.
This course examines the etiology and treatment of specific pulmonary diseases and other disease conditions that adversely affect the cardiopulmonary system. Topics include, but are not limited to, restrictive and obstructive pulmonary diseases, pulmonary infections, neoplasms, emboli, pediatric and neonatal pulmonary conditions, chest wall diseases, sleep disorders, and thoracic trauma, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Also included are basic chest x-ray interpretation, radiation safety, and physical examination and assessment of the chest. Prerequisites: BIOL 0950,and CHEM 0190 and RESCA 0020.

RESCA 1030 CLINICAL PRACTICUM 1
7 cr.
This hospital-based activity allows for supervised student practice of basic respiratory care therapeutics, electrocardiography, arterial blood gases, and home care. Prerequisites: RESCA 0020 and 1022 and 1026 and 1028 and CHEM 0141.

RESCA 1031 ELECTROCARDIOGRAM/ARTERIAL BLOOD GAS (EKG/ABG)
4 cr.
This course introduces the student to drawing arterial blood gases, the collection and interpretation of data, and correlation to disease states. Techniques for obtaining electrocardiograms and their interpretation are covered.

RESCA 1032 RESPIRATORY CARE TECHNIQUES 3
4 cr.
Introduces the equipment and techniques used in continuous mechanical ventilation, hemodynamic monitoring, quality control, and advanced airway management. Prerequisites: RESCA 1024, RESCA 1030 and 0131.

RESCA 1034 CLINICAL PRACTICUM 2
8 cr.
This hospital-based activity allows for supervised student practice of continuous mechanical ventilation, critical care, and airway management in an intensive-care unit setting as well as emergency medicine, skilled-nursing facility, and physician’s office exposure. Prerequisites: RESCA 1024, RESCA 1030 and 1031.       

RESCA 1038 CLINICAL PRACTICUM 3
10 cr.
A continuation of RESCA 1034, with expansion into specialty areas. Prerequisites: RESCA 1032, RESCA 1034.        

RESCA 1039 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES
2 cr.
This hospital-based and didactic activity allows the student to pursue advanced study and practice in a variety of aspects of respiratory care. This will allow for further advancements, discussions, and projects in respiratory care. Prerequisites: RESCA 1032, RESCA 1034.

RESCA 1041 SELECTED TOPICS
3 cr.
The purpose of this course is to provide a variety of respiratory care and related topics for first-year students to better prepare them for their clinical exposure. Topics include, but are not limited to the following: infection control, medical gases, oxygen therapy basics, the hospital culture, scope of practice, pulmonary rehabilitation, clinical tour, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), home-care/skilled-nursing facilities, hospice, and organ donation. Prerequisite:BIOL 0950 and CHEM 0190 and RESCA 0020.
 

SECONDARY EDUCATION (SCED)

 

 

SCED 0010 DIRECTED TUTORING IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
1–3 cr.
Provides secondary education and pre-education majors with tutoring experiences in area school districts or other field settings. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

SCED 0011 DIRECTED PRACTICUM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
1–3 cr.
Provides individual secondary education and pre-education majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member on teaching or curriculum projects, or the opportunity to work with a teacher in the field as part of, or a continuation of, pre-student teaching experiences. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

SCED 0012 DIRECTED STUDY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
1–3 cr.
Provides individual secondary education and pre-education majors the opportunity to explore in-depth specific topics in education. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

SCED 0013 DIRECTED RESEARCH IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
1–3 cr.
Provides individual secondary education and pre-education majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member on research projects. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

SCED 1100 GENERAL METHODS
3 cr.
Provides students with an opportunity to familiarize themselves with teaching-learning theories, strategies, and experiences prior to the specific methods course and student teaching. Students well be assigned to area schools to tutor, or observe and conduct mini-lessons. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program.

SCED 1120 SECONDARY MATHEMATICS METHODS 1
3 cr.

Introduces students to mathematics teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in mathematics education.  Principles and techniques of lesson planning, mathematical content and curricula, academic standards, teaching methods, classroom management, and assessment will be explored and analyzed.  Students will also be assigned to an area school for a practicum component which will provide opportunities for observation/analysis of teaching-learning behavior, assessment of learning difficulties, and activities in a typical secondary mathematics classroom.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program.


SCED 1121 SECONDARY MATHEMATICS METHODS 2        
3 cr.

Continues to familiarize students to mathematics teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in mathematics education.  Varied activities of the secondary school mathematics teacher, mathematics curricula, academic standards, resources and materials, differentiated instruction techniques, student-centered approaches, assessment of learning difficulties, and professional growth will be explored and analyzed.  Students will concurrently participate in pre-student teaching field experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1172.


SCED 1122 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE: MATHEMATICS
1 cr.
Secondary education mathematics students will be assigned to a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two hours per week for eight weeks for observation and practice teaching in a secondary classroom. Several preparatory, discussion, and debriefing sessions will be held on campus with the university instructor. The course emphasis is on active participation in pre-student teaching activities and designed to prepare pre-service teachers to become reflective secondary mathematics teachers.  Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1171.

SCED 1144 SECONDARY ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS 1           
3 cr.

Introduces students to English/language arts teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in English education. Principles and techniques of lesson planning, mathematical content and curricula, academic standards, teaching methods, classroom management, and assessment will be explored and analyzed.  Students will also be assigned to an area school for a practicum component which will provide opportunities for observation/analysis of teaching-learning behavior, assessment of learning difficulties, and activities in a typical secondary English/language arts classroom.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program.


SCED 1145 SECONDARY ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS 2
3 cr.

Continues to familiarize students with English/language arts teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in English education. Varied activities of the secondary school English/language arts teacher, English/language arts curricula, academic standards, resources and materials, differentiated instruction techniques, student-centered approaches, assessment of learning difficulties, and professional growth will be explored and analyzed. Students will concurrently participate in pre-student teaching field experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1146.


SCED 1146 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE: ENGLISH
1 cr.
Secondary education English/language arts students will be assigned to a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two hours per week for eight weeks for observation and practice teaching in a secondary classroom. Several preparatory, discussion, and debriefing sessions will be held on campus with the university instructor. The course emphasis is on active participation in pre-student teaching activities and designed to prepare pre-service teachers to become reflective secondary English/language arts teachers. Prerequisite: Admission to upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1145.

SCED 1160 SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 1
3 cr.

Introduces students to social studies teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in social studies education.  Principles and techniques of lesson planning, social studies content and curricula, academic standards, teaching methods, classroom management, and assessment will be explored and analyzed.  Students will also be assigned to an area school for a practicum component which will provide opportunities for observation/analysis of teaching-learning behavior, assessment of learning difficulties, and activities in a typical secondary social studies classroom.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program.


SCED 1161 SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS 2
3 cr.

Continues to familiarize students with social studies teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in social studies education. Varied activities of the secondary school social studies teacher, social studies curricula, academic standards, resources and materials, differentiated instruction techniques, student-centered approaches, assessment of learning difficulties, and professional growth will be explored and analyzed. Students will concurrently participate in pre-student teaching field experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 100; Corequisite: SCED 1162.


SCED 1162 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE: SOCIAL STUDIES
1 cr.

Secondary education social studies students will be assigned to a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two hours per week for eight weeks for observation and practice teaching in a secondary classroom. Several preparatory, discussion, and debriefing sessions will be held on campus with the university instructor. The course emphasis is on active participation in pre-student teaching activities and designed to prepare pre-service teachers to become reflective secondary social studies teachers. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 100; Corequisite: SCED 1161


SCED 1164 SECONDARY SCIENCE METHODS 1
3 cr.

Introduces students to science teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in science education.  Principles and techniques of lesson planning, mathematical content and curricula, academic standards, teaching methods, classroom management, and assessment will be explored and analyzed.  Students will also be assigned to an area school for a practicum component which will provide opportunities for observation/analysis of teaching-learning behavior, assessment of learning difficulties, and activities in a typical secondary science classroom.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program.


SCED 1165 SECONDARY SCIENCE METHODS 2
3 cr.
Continues to familiarize students to science teaching-learning theories, strategies, experiences, and issues in science education. Varied activities of the secondary school science teacher, science curricula, academic standards, resources and materials, differentiated instruction techniques, student-centered approaches, assessment of learning difficulties, and professional growth will be explored and analyzed. Students will concurrently participate in pre-student teaching field experience. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1161.

SCED 1166 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE: SCIENCE
1 cr.

Secondary education science students will be assigned to a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two hours per week for eight weeks for observation and practice teaching in a secondary classroom. Several preparatory, discussion, and debriefing sessions will be held on campus with the university instructor. The course emphasis is on active participation in pre-student teaching activities and designed to prepare pre-service teachers to become reflective secondary science teachers. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level secondary education science program, SCED 1100; Corequisite: SCED 1165.


SCED 1170 READING IN THE CONTENT AREAS
3 cr.
Emphasizes reading and writing as cognitive processes. Vocabulary development in content areas, reading comprehension, and current reading assessment practices are examined. Incorporates unit and lesson planning, focusing on pre-reading, guided reading, and post-reading literacy strategies. Prerequisite: Admission to an upper-level secondary education program, SCED 1100.

SCED 1171 MATHEMATICS METHODS
3 cr.
Emphasizes varied activities of the secondary school mathematics teacher. Includes observation and analysis of teaching and learning behavior, assessment of learning difficulties, resources and materials, principles and techniques of lesson planning, teaching-learning strategies, evaluation, and discussion of content standards and  reform issues in mathematics education. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education mathematics program, SCED 1100. Corequisite: SCED 1172.

SCED 1172 PRE-STUDENT TEACHING FIELD EXPERIENCE: MATHEMATICS
1 cr.
Secondary education mathematics students will be assigned to a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two hours per week for eight weeks for observation and practice teaching in a secondary classroom. Several preparatory, discussion, and debriefing sessions will be held on campus with the University instructor. The course emphasis is on active participation in pre-student teaching activities. Students will be provided with a list of requirements and expectations for classroom performance. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education mathematics program, SCED 1100. This important course must be taken concurrently with SCED 1171 Mathematics Methods. A grade of A or B in this course is required for student teaching

SCED 1187 STUDENT TEACHING—EXPERIENCED TEACHERS
1–14 cr.
For experienced teachers who need student teaching to satisfy certification guidelines. Specific requirements such as length of term, number of credits, etc., will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: At least one year of successful teaching experience and admission to an upper-level secondary education program.

SCED 1191 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL  
14 cr.
Full-time experience for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at an area high school or middle school. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from University supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are within 15-20 miles of UPJ; students are placed in established sites only. Open only to secondary education students approved for student teaching.
 
SCED 1192   SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENT TEACHING–US        
7cr.

Seven weeks in duration, this full-time experience is designed for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at an area high school or middle school. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are within 15–20 miles of Pitt-Johnstown; students are placed in established sites only. Open only to secondary education students approved for student teaching

 
SCED 1193 SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING ABROAD-NEW ZEALAND                   7cr. 

Seven-weeks in duration, this full-time experience is designed for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at a secondary school in New Zealand. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are selected in exemplary Auckland area schools; students are placed in established sites only. Open only to secondary education students approved for student teaching.

 
SCED 1195 SECONDARY EDUCATION STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR
2 cr.
Designed to provide the student teacher with the basic elements of professional development and career opportunities. Emphasis is on professionalism, interviewing, résumés, portfolios, professional meetings, and other appropriate topics. To be taken by secondary education students during the student teaching term.

SOCIAL SCIENCES (SOCSCI)

 

 

SOCSCI 1910 INTERNSHIP
3–12 cr.
Students majoring in any of the social sciences may earn up to 12 credits for a full term's experience in a position in some public or private organization or agency appropriate to their fields of interest. Supervision by the contracting agency and faculty sponsor. Students earning internships must write an extensive summarization and analysis of their field experiences. Grade for course is S/U only and is not counted in QPA.

SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

 

 

SOC 0070 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
3 cr.
The major aims of this course are to understand the nature of important social problems in American society and analyze their causes and consequences. The two competing perspectives, one, that social problems are created when individuals fail to conform to societal norms, and two, that social problems are caused when institutions fail to meet changing needs and aspirations of individuals will be used in our analysis. Future trends and policy alternatives toward amelioration will be examined.

SOC 0100 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
This course introduces the student to the discipline of sociology, its development, theories, major findings, and to the sociological interpretation of modern society. Emphasis will be given to the importance of careful empirical investigation for the understanding of recent social and cultural changes. Students should be prepared to encounter basic issues in sociological method and in theory; an inclination toward systematic and abstract reasoning will help.

SOC 0221 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.
This is an introductory course in sociological social psychology. The emphasis is on such sociological concepts and processes as: culture and society, language, role playing, definition of the situation, presentation of self, expressed values and opinions, and the performance of role(s). The social order is conceived as being composed of three integrated, interactive components: culture, society, and the individual. Prerequisite: SOC 0100

SOC 0300 SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS
3 cr.
An introduction to qualitative and quantitative methods used in the social sciences. The first third of the course covers ethical issues in social research, defining a topic, developing theory, conceptualization, and operationalization. The second third of the course covers specific methods: survey, experiment, observation, the use of existing data, and program evaluation. The final third of the course covers the logic of analysis, as well as writing up and presenting research results. Examples drawn from various social science disciplines.

SOC 0310 COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS
3 cr.
This course examines complex organizations of all types (industrial, commercial, governmental, religious, educational, social welfare, etc.) giving special attention to issues of power and authority. People make decisions according to bureaucratic rules, in problem-solving groups, and in interest groups that seek to win advantages for themselves and their members. Decisions and other organizational acts will be studied sociologically. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0320 WEALTH AND POWER
3 cr.
The interdependence of these two key sociological concepts is discussed in the context of American society. The role of the multinational corporation and the global economy are examined. The pervasive power of some is contrasted with the generalized powerlessness of the majority. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0340 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
This course examines the relationship between political institutions, such as states, and processes of stratification. With a major focus on American society, these relationships are studied in historical and cross-societal comparative perspective as well as in terms of a society’s location in the system of international relations. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0350 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE
3 cr.
Traces the historical development of social welfare in the United States, focusing on the changing value systems underlying welfare institutions. The course examines the development of social service agencies and the profession of social work. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.            

SOC 0380 SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the sociological perspective on the family and analyzes how the structure and nature of family life are shaped by larger historical and social forces. Students will look at how changes in the economy and technology affect the family; how ideas concerning gender roles affect male/female relationships and the socialization of children; how race, ethnicity, and class shape family life; and the wide variety of family forms, historical and contemporary. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0390 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
3 cr.
This course will compare and contrast major classical and modern sociological theories of religion, including discussion of the renewed focus on religion in mainstream general theory. Attention will be narrowed to a focus on the relation between religions, states, and individuals in comparative and historical perspective. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.          

SOC 0400 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES
3 cr.
This course will deal with the foundations of modern sociological theory through a study of major social theorists of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0430 POPULATION AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
This course will focus on the three major components of population change: fertility, mortality, and migration. The differential effects of these three factors on population size and on age, racial, and sexual compositions of national populations—particularly the U.S. population but also on other world populations—will be examined. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0440 URBAN SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
The modern city is simultaneously many different things. It is an assortment of neighborhoods, it is a workshop with factories and offices, it is a crisscross of transportation arteries, it is a marketplace for the interplay of economic interests, it is an object which several different governments try to understand and control, and it is an astonishing mixture of religious, racial, ethnic, recreational, vocational, professional, educational, medical, political, social, and deviant communities. This urban complex will be studied with a sociological approach. Prerequisite SOC 0100

SOC 0461 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER
3 cr.
Analyzes the various processes and institutions through which gender roles are defined and shaped in our society. It will analyze the interaction between individual conceptions of gender and larger social institutions such as the family, the workforce, the media, religion, etc. The current changes in these roles will be related to changes in other social institutions. Also examines the multiple forms of inequality in our society—based on sex, race, class, and sexual preference—and how they interact. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0492 MASS MEDIA
3 cr.
This course deals with the many-faceted roles of mass media in society and explains how and why the media have achieved their present prominence and influence on people’s lives. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.  

SOC 0500 CONTEMPORARY SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES
3 cr.
The aim of this course is to provide a survey of major developments in sociological theory in recent times. The classic background for these developments is included as part of the course. Lectures, readings, and discussions help the student to acquire a grasp of the significance of theoretical analysis in sociology and of basic sociological problems addressed by a variety of theorists. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0520 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
3 cr.
This course offers ideological, structural, and functional treatment of dominant American movements for social and cultural change in the contemporary world. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 0600 SOCIOLOGY OF DIVERSITY
3 cr.
This is a course presenting the central sociological interpretations of majority/minority relations. The course includes consideration of selected racial, ethnic, sexual, political, economic, and religious minorities in the United States and around the world. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.  

SOC 0710 DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL
3 cr.
This course raises questions about what is deviant and how certain actions and beliefs come to be considered deviant. It also raises questions concerning the social, structural, and cultural determinants of the decision to view something as deviant and in need of “control.” The course explores changes in the definition of behavior that lead the same behaviors to be considered “sins,” “crimes,” “illnesses,” and “alternative lifestyles.” Prerequisite: SOC 0100.
 
SOC 0715 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE                 
3 cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the numerous elements of the American criminal justice system, from defining and measuring crimes to the major components of the criminal justice system (police, criminal courts, and corrections). By exploring law and society in general, including the history, structure, function, and contemporary problems faced by each of the elements of the criminal justice system, the goal of this course is to create a fuller understanding of the criminal justice system, the ways it impacts our lives on a daily basis, and potential avenues of reform.


SOC 0720 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY
3 cr.
Criminology refers to the scientific study of crime, its causes, and social responses to it. This course provides a broad overview of the study of crime. It examines the legal definitions and elements of crime; surveys the major categories of crime, i.e., predatory and nonpredatory acts; reviews the major measures of crime; identifies the major correlates of crime; reviews and assesses the major theories of crime; differentiates types of offenders and explores various dimensions of their offending; and examines and evaluates the working of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.
 
SOC 0725 CRIMINAL COURT PROCEDURE
3 cr.
This introductory course provides a broad overview of the role of courts in the American criminal justice system, including judicial procedure, organization, and personnel. The course will focus on how courts function and the elements of courts, trials, and criminal law. Students will explore theories of justice, dispute resolution, and criminal responsibility; learn about the roles played by the major participants in the process of adjudication and what happens at each stage of the criminal process; and discuss the influence of current political and social debates on the operation of the criminal courts.
 
SOC 0735 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
3 cr.

This course offers an in-depth analysis and examination of current controversies in the criminal justice system, including contemporary criminal justice policy, application of the law, and criminal justice ethics. Students will be expected to acquire an informed understanding of the history and current status of these debates, the arguments being made on all sides, and the evidence used in support of each position in order to be able to formulate, articulate, and defend an informed opinion on these current controversies.


SOC 0750 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING
3 cr.

This course studies the fate of being old in American society in terms of income adequacy, participation in political life, family relationships, the status of retirement as an institution, health, the loss of independence, and life in nursing homes. These and related issues are examined in cross-national perspective to assess the level and some nationally distinctive ways in which modern society cares for its elderly. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.  


SOC 0790 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
3 cr.
The purpose of the course is to show the place of education as a subsystem within a larger societal structure and to understand the significance of education for the vital area of socialization. Educational values, norms, roles, and institutions, as well as the various aspects of the educational process, will be analyzed. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.          

SOC 1110 HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
Historical sociology is an approach to the study of sociology that explains social conditions through analysis and interpretation of the past. The course surveys techniques and theories of concern to sociologists studying long-term social transformations, emergence of social structures, and development of particular social institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1113 ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
This course addresses the relationship among human beings, their social organization, and the environment, both “natural” and “built.”  Of special concern in this course will be issues related to social stratification, power, and environmental/ecological issues. Prerequisite: SOC 0100 or SOC 0070.

SOC 1350 WELFARE POLICY AND INSTITUTIONS
3 cr.
This course examines social welfare policies and institutions in the United States from a sociological perspective and traces the development of major social welfare programs. The major emphasis is on the conflicting value systems and pressure groups and on the interrelationships between the welfare institution and other institutions of society. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1352 HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
3 cr.
This course uses the social systems approach as the basis for studying human behavior and the social environment. It recognizes that there is no generally accepted unified theory of human behavior, nor is there any single theory that is sufficient for all professionals working in the field. There are many theories and systems of knowledge that have been developed for a variety of purposes and within a range of perspectives. This diversity of viewpoints is recognized as a valid approach to understanding the complex and multifaceted aspects of behavior and personality. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1439 EVOLUTIONARY SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.
An introduction to evolutionary sociology: the application of evolutionary theory to individual and group behavior. The course investigates how the interaction of genetic, environmental, and social factors can help to explain the development of both simple and complex human behaviors. Topics to be covered in the course include the theory of evolution by natural selection; selfishness, cooperation, and altruism; social status and dominance; men's and women's long-term and short-term mating strategies; parenting and kinship; intrasexual and intersexual conflict. Prerequisite: SOC 0100 or PSY 0200.

SOC 1670 IDENTITY AND CULTURE
3 cr.
This course is a study of social, scientific, and humanistic conceptions of cultural movements and individual identity in modern societies. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1700 SENIOR SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY
3 cr.

This required course begins with an overview of the discipline, examining the basic theoretical perspectives and how those affect the issues, methods, and uses of sociology. The rest of the course emphasizes the student's own relationship to sociology, and the work and educational opportunities available to those with sociological training. Course is limited to junior and senior students. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.           


SOC 1801 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity usually off campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1802 DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in character to a regular course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1803 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form. Prerequisite: SOC 0100.

SOC 1804 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

SPANISH (SPAN)

 

 

SPAN 0111 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 1
4 cr.

A thorough introduction (in two terms) to the Spanish grammar, with extensive practice in the four skills: reading, writing, understanding, and speaking.


SPAN 0112 ELEMENTARY SPANISH 2
4 cr.

A thorough introduction (in two terms) to the Spanish grammar, with extensive practice in the four skills: reading, writing, understanding, and speaking. Prerequisite: SPAN 0111


SPAN 0211 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 1
3 cr.

This course is a continuation of the first-year sequence and includes a functional review of language structure and vocabulary. Primary emphasis is development of conversational skills, with topical reading and some writing. Prerequisite: SPAN 0112


SPAN 0212 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 2
3 cr.

Students continue a functional review of language structure and build vocabulary. Emphasis is on conversational, reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPAN 0211.


SPAN 0320 CONVERSATION
3 cr.

The aims of this course are to improve the learner's ability to understand and speak fluent Spanish. A native speaker instructor guides the student, but the learner does most of the talking. Emphasis in small classes is on vocabulary building and some basic structures. Daily participation is necessary. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212.


SPAN 0325 GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION
3 cr.
A review of Spanish grammar, designed to aid the student in building vocabulary, translating from English to Spanish, and writing compositions. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212


SPAN 0351 LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION
3 cr.
Readings, lectures, films, and class discussions in Spanish on the historical development of Latin American civilization and its major social, economic, and cultural features. This course is required for Spanish majors.  Prerequisite: SPAN 0212

SPAN 0355 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE 1
3 cr.

Aims to acquaint students with major genres and trends of Spanish literature from the 16th century to the present, to equip them with essential techniques of literary criticism, and to develop their ability to speak and write in the second language. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212


SPAN 0356 INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC LITERATURE 2
3 cr.

Aims to acquaint students with major genres and trends of Latin American literature from the 16th century to the present, to equip them with essential techniques of literary criticism, and to develop their ability to speak and write in the second language. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212


SPAN 0451 SEMINAR IN CERVANTES
3 cr.
A seminar for Spanish majors and others that focuses on Don Quixote and various minor works. Quixote is read closely in Spanish and analyzed in class for content, narrative technique, structure, and style. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212 or equivalent.

SPAN 0453 SEMINAR IN HISPANIC POETRY
3 cr.
This seminar focuses on the finest poetry of Spain and Spanish America. All poetry is read in Spanish and discussed in English or Spanish. Students formulate specific topics and present the results of their study to the seminar. This seminar may be taken twice for credit, provided the focus is not duplicated.

SPAN 0454 SEMINAR IN 20TH-CENTURY SPANISH-AMERICAN/FICTION
3 cr.
A seminar for Spanish majors and others focusing on the novel and short fiction of the recent boom in Latin American literature. The following authors are considered: Borges, Garcia Marquez, Vargas Llosa, Carpentier, Puig, Fuentes, Cortazar, Rulfo, Denevi, Cabrera Infante, and others. Works are read in Spanish and discussed in Spanish for content, theme, structure, narrative technique, and style. Texts vary from term to term. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212 or equivalent.

SPAN 0463 SEMINAR IN GOLDEN AGE DRAMA
3 cr.
A seminar for Spanish majors and others focusing on the Spanish drama of the Golden Age (17th century). Plays by Lope De Vega, Tirso De Molina, Calderon De La Barca, and others are read in Spanish and analyzed in class for content, theme, structure, dramatic technique, and style. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212 or equivalent.

SPAN 1021 ADVANCED CONVERSATION
3 cr.
This course develops advanced oral skills in small class groups. Students work to build vocabulary and gain a control of the essential structures. Both Spanish majors and nonmajors who wish to improve their fluency may enroll in this course. Prerequisite: Spanish 0212 or its equivalent.

SPAN 1026 ADVANCED GRAMMAR
3 cr.
An advanced study of Spanish grammar designed for students who have already taken SPAN 0325 grammar and composition or have equivalent knowledge. While the emphasis is on practical usage, theoretical aspects of the finer points of syntax will also be considered. Prerequisite: SPAN 0325.

SPAN 1193 LITERARY TRANSLATION
3 cr.
This course is intended to develop translating skills in literary (including scholarly and critical), journalistic, and advertising texts. (It is intended to develop translating skills for legal, business, or industrial texts.) It involves the discussion of translation problems and the ways to solve (or circumvent) them through the actual task of translating selected passages from fiction, poetry, plays, and articles.

SPAN 1331 STRUCTURE OF MODERN SPANISH
3 cr.

This course teaches the structure of the Spanish language, including components which address Spanish phonology, morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212


SPAN 1443 LATIN AMERICAN NARRATIVE
3 cr.

This course deals with the development of Latin American prose narrative as it moves from 19th century realism and naturalism in the direction of modernista and vanguardista innovations, culminating in the narrative of the boom and the post-boom.  Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212


SPAN 1444 LATIN AMERICAN TOPICS
3 cr.
This course deals with literary, linguistics, or cultural topics—or a combination of these. Its primary emphasis is on developing an understanding of contemporary cultures in Latin America. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212 or equivalent.

SPAN 1445 SEMINAR: LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
3 cr.
This course studies various cultural and literary topics according to the needs and interests of the students. Its purpose is to allow students to do original research on topics of interest in the field of Latin American literature and culture. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212 or equivalent.

SPAN 1640 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE
3 cr.
This course surveys the development of Spanish literature from the 12th century to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212, SPAN 0355, or equivalent.

SPAN 1841 DON QUIXOTE AND THE NOVEL
3 cr.
This course deals in-depth with Cervantes’ Don Quixote as the first modern novel and its profound influence on European literature. Taught in English.

SPAN 1844 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 cr.
This course deals with contemporary Latin American literature, showing its literary development up to and including the so-called boom, as well as post-boom developments. The course also will deal with the cultural values and concepts of the works read. Taught in English.

SPAN 1846 HISPANIC DRAMA IN TRANSLATION
3 cr.
This course deals with contemporary Spanish and Latin American drama (in translation) with emphasis on the ways in which the dramas reflect cultural and social concepts and values.

SPAN 1941 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
This course allows students to work in-depth in areas of their choice; evaluation is by examination or by the production of a term paper.

STATISTICS (STAT)

 

 

STAT 1020 SOCIAL STATISTICS (QR)
3 cr.
This is an introductory course in statistical analysis. Emphasis is on theory and logic of drawing conclusions about populations based on samples drawn from those populations. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, parametric and nonparametric hypothesis tests, analysis of variance, and correlation and regression. No Prerequisite.

STAT 1040 STATISTICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
3 cr.
An introductory course in probability, probability distributions, functions of random variables, and concepts of relationships between and among random variables. It includes statistical inference about population parameters and an introduction to least squares regression analysis. This course has applications in finance, business, and economics. A prior college course in mathematics is recommended.

STUDIO ARTS (SA)

 

 

SA 0111 FOUNDATION DESIGN
3 cr.
This introductory course is a comprehensive survey of the fundamental principles of visual organization. The assignments stress seeing, thinking, and expressing visually. The class projects involve use of art materials with which to articulate line, shape, texture, and other design components. The intent is to broaden understanding of visual relationships in art and in the sources of art and design.

SA 0131 FOUNDATION DRAWING
3 cr.
This is an introductory course that instructs students in traditional drawing approaches and visual analysis through the act of drawing. Principles of perspective, composition, and methods of modeling form are explored for the development of individual skills and perception.

SA 1251 PAINTING
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the techniques and concepts of painting. Students will explore composition, illusionistic devices, figurative and nonfigurative imagery, color, and the nature of painting as an expressive medium. In addition to painting assignments, the course consists of lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and discussions of past and contemporary painting issues.

SA 1470 GRAPHIC DESIGN
3 cr.
This course involves the analysis and solution of graphic design problems through principles of layout and design. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and application of typography (letter forms), symbology, illustration, and various graphic reproduction procedures related to graphic communication of ideas.

SA 1500 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
To be arranged in consultation with instructor.

SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY (SURTEC)

 

 

SURTEC 1010 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 1
6 cr.
This course will introduce the student to the components of effective communication in the operating room. It will include ethical, legal, and moral responsibilities of operating room personnel; terminology; and the history of surgery. The student will be introduced to the principles of sterilization, equipment used in the operating room, and the basics of safe patient care. Students will learn how to perform the surgical scrub as well as gown and glove procedures. Surgical instrumentation, sutures, and procedures will be introduced. Prerequisites: BIOL 0950, CHEM 0190 , BIOL 0970 , BIOL 0980.

SURTEC 1020 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 1—CLINICAL COMPONENT
8 cr.

Students will be introduced to disinfection and sterilization procedures and practice such procedures in the operating room and central sterile supply areas. Students will be assigned to the OR’s patient holding area and assist in the preoperative preparation of the surgical patient. Students will transport and position patients for surgery, assist with circulating duties, scrub, gown and glove, and participate in surgical intervention. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1010, BIOL 0950, CHEM 0190, BIOL 0970, BIOL 0980.


SURTEC 1030 PHARMACOLOGY
3 cr.
This course will introduce the student to the basic principles of pharmacology.  Students will identify basic drugs used by the surgical patient, their side effects, and the common dosage. The student will be exposed to  the proper response to drug reactions and demonstrate safe practice when using drugs on the sterile field. The student will also be instructed in the legal responsibilities of the surgical technologist in handling drugs and solutions. Prerequisite: BIOL 0950, CHEM 0190, BIOL 0970, BIOL 0980.

SURTEC 1040 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 2
9 cr.
This course is a continuation of SURTEC 1010 Operating Room Techniques 1 and will emphasize advanced procedures. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1010, SURTEC 1020, SURTEC 1030.

SURTEC 1050 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 2—CLINICAL COMPONENT
8 cr.
A continuation of SURTEC 1020 Operating Room Techniques 1—Clinical Component, with more intensive clinical procedures. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1010, SURTEC 1020, SURTEC 1030.

SURTEC 1060 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 3
3 cr.
This course is a continuation of SURTEC 1040 Operating Room Techniques 2 and will emphasize additional advanced procedures along with a review of procedures contained within SURTEC 1010 and 1040, Operating Room Techniques 1 and 2. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1040, SURTEC 1050.

SURTEC 1070 OPERATING ROOM TECHNIQUES 3—CLINICAL COMPONENT
3 cr.
A continuation of SURTEC 1020 Operating Room Techniques 1—Clinical Component, with more intensive clinical procedures. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1020, SURTEC 1010, SURTEC 1030. This course represents the final clinical component for the surgical technologist program. Proficiency in all clinical procedures will be reinforced and individual competencies assessed. Prerequisites: SURTEC 1040, SURTEC 1050.

THEATRE ARTS (THEA)

 

 

THEA 0027 STAGECRAFT 1
3 cr.
Entails a study of the construction and rigging of scenic units for stage settings.

THEA 0028 STAGE LIGHTING 1
3 cr.
This course will entail a study of stage lighting equipment and related technologies that are used in the typical proscenium and arena-style theaters.

THEA 0040 STAGE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course will examine in detail the backstage activities necessary to support a professional theatrical, music theater, or concert production—from sound and lighting cue placement to properties and running crew. Students anticipating careers in the entertainment industry will benefit from this background in communication, safety, proper terminology, and technical support. Course will have a final project in lieu of a final exam.


THEA 0053 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE
3 cr.
An investigation of the process of rendering literature aloud, with attention to problems of impersonation, consideration of style, and application of specific vocal techniques.

 

THEA 0630 PUPPETRY IN THEATRE
3 cr.
This course will explore a variety of puppetry forms and will cover their historical context as well as practical design issues, performance aesthetic and techniques, and  the influence that each form exerts on theatre today. Students will then translate several children's tales from page to stage, culminating in a performance.

 

THEA 0811 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMATIC ART 1
3 cr.
This course will entail a study of the nature and variety of the dramatic experience. Readings from an anthology of world drama, as well as attendance at several live theatrical productions are required. A basic assumption is that drama differs from literature in profound ways, and seeing plays helps reveal the difference.

THEA 0812 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMATIC ART 2
3 cr.
A continuation of THEA 0811 Introduction to Dramatic Art 1, with special emphasis given to theater history and the development of the physical theater.

THEA 0841 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE DESIGN
3 cr.
An introduction to the process of designing scenery, lighting, properties, and costumes for live theater.

THEA 1027 STAGECRAFT 2
3 cr.
This course will entail a study of specialized scenic techniques such as scene painting, property construction, and the use of new materials. Students will play a major role in the construction of scenery for a departmental  production.

THEA 1028 STAGE LIGHTING 2
3 cr.
This course explores more thoroughly the techniques and artistry of the lighting design process. Subjects to be covered include script analysis, design collaboration, lighting plots, and color theory. Prerequisite: THEA 0028.

THEA 1500 VOICE AND MOVEMENT 1
3 cr.
This course stresses principles of effective, safe vocal production, maximizing sound, and expressivity. The international phonetic alphabet is taught as a tool for the second objective of the course, precise articulation with a minimizing of regional sound.

THEA 1502 ACTING 1
3 cr.
This course will entail a study of beginning skills such as movement for the stage, relaxation, and beginning acting tasks (observations, emotional recall, use of space, concentration). Beginning scene work will be included.

THEA 1503 ACTING 2
3 cr.
A continuation of the prerequisite THEA 1502 Acting 1, with advanced scene work drawn largely from the theater of realism. Required participation in UPJ main-stage productions. Prerequisite: THEA 1502.

THEA 1504 ACTING 3
3 cr.
This is an intensive scene study course for advanced students who have completed Acting 1 and 2. In addition to advanced realism, scene work will be derived from other historical styles. Prerequisite: THEA 1503.

THEA 1505 ACTING 4
3 cr.
A continuation of THEA 1504 Acting 3, with some emphasis given to preparation of audition pieces. Prerequisite: THEA 1504

 

THEA 1506 MODERN ACTING THEORY
3cr.
Students will first learn some of the major acting theories and perspectives of character development from the 20th century .  Then students will apply these theories through scene work, monologues, and original projects.

 

THEA 1510 DIRECTING 1
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to basic technical and conceptual skills in directing, including script analysis, ground plan, stage movement, and composition. Prerequisite: THEA 1502

THEA 1511 DIRECTING 2
3 cr.
This course will entail a study of scene analysis and directing projects from plays of 1860-1980. It will deal with the special demands of different playwrights. Prerequisite: THEA 1510.

 

THEA 1541 THEATRE REPERTORY 1
1–6 cr.

Active participation in the staging of a University dramatic production and/or dance. Students study various backstage processes and performance techniques according to their individual needs and interests. A maximum of 6 credits from THEA 1541 and THEA 1542 Theater Repertory 1 and 2 may be counted toward graduation.


THEA 1542 THEATRE REPERTORY 2
1–6 cr.

Advanced students are assigned to positions that enable them to take primary responsibility for one aspect of a dramatic production. Beginning students study basic backstage and performance techniques. A maximum of 6 credits from THEA 1541 and THEA 1542 Theater Repertory 1 and 2 may be counted toward graduation.


THEA 1543 THEATER REPERTORY—STAGE MOVEMENT
1 cr.

Focuses on physical vocabulary through modes of dance—ballet, jazz, modern—and study of body centers, addressing needs of on-stage performers.


THEA 1567 SENIOR SEMINAR IN THEATRE
3 cr.
Special topic selected by student and instructor. For Theatre Arts majors only.

THEA 1629 THEATRE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
The purpose of this class is to instruct students in the financial complexities of preparing a show, from working on a budget with the producer, designers, and technical area to processing expenditures.

THEA 1635 SCENE DESIGN 1
3 cr.
This course will provide a study of the elements of scenery design, with preliminary investigation of historical developments as well as modern currents of design.

THEA 1733 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in theater arts.

THEA 1765 PLAYWRITING
3 cr.
A beginning course in writing for the stage. Starting with short scenes, students will work toward understanding the craft and art of constructing theater stories to be performed by actors. The final project will be a one-act play. Throughout there will be emphasis on the stage effectiveness of the writing and opportunity for informal performance of student scripts. Cross-listed as ENGWRT 0541. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or 0006.

THEA 1902 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Course content to be decided between teacher and student.
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