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Course Description

Note: (QR) denotes quantitative reasoning courses.

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

 

PHIL 0013 CONCEPTS OF HUMAN NATURE
3 cr.
An introduction to some ways in which ethical and social thought has been influenced by different views of human nature. Readings are from such authors as Plato, Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, and Freud.

PHIL 0083 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS
3 cr.
An introduction to some classical problems of philosophy. Topics vary, but might include skepticism, free will, the existence of God, and the justification of ethical beliefs.

PHIL 0120 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.

This course deals with moral and philosophical issues having to do with humanity's relationship to the environment and humanity's duties toward future generations and perhaps to nature itself.  It will deal both with theory and with practice.


PHIL 0203 PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE
3 cr.

This course examines of philosophical themes in literature from both east and west.  A novel, a play, folk tales, and poetry will be discussed.


PHIL 0209 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
The aim of this course is to introduce students to some of the main achievements and leading ideas of ancient Greek philosophy up to classical times. Emphasis will be on understanding and evaluating the arguments and ideas of the Greek philosophical tradition.

PHIL 0213 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
An introduction to the philosophical period from Descartes through Kant. Special attention is given to at least one rationalist, one empiricist, and Kant.

PHIL 0230 PHILOSOPHY AND FILM
3 cr.

This is an introductory aesthetics course dealing with philosophy and film.


PHIL 0303 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS
3 cr.
An examination of philosophical theories concerning good and evil, right and wrong, and virtue and vice, and their implications for some specific moral issues.

PHIL 0320 SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
An introduction to some traditional philosophical perspectives on the nature of society. Philosophers studied might include Plato, Hobbes, Marx, and twentieth-century social theorists.

PHIL 0333 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
This introductory-level undergraduate course studies several important views on the nature and justification of government, such as those of Plato, Hobbes, and Marx.

PHIL 0353 PHILOSOPHY AND PUBLIC ISSUES
3 cr.
The aim of this introductory undergraduate course is to encourage systematic and clear thought about issues of public importance by philosophic reflection that emphasizes the implications of different moral and political theories for these issues.

PHIL 0363 MORALITY AND MEDICINE
3 cr.
This introductory-level undergraduate course examines various ethical problems arising in medicine, such as euthanasia, abortion, and the allocation of resources.

PHIL 0440 MINDS AND MACHINES
3 cr.
This introductory level course is devoted to explicating and critically evaluating the thesis that the human mind, or at least its cognitive faculty, can be understood as a computing machine. Readings are primarily from contemporary authors, and include both scientists and philosophers.

PHIL 0474 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
3 cr.
This course includes a critical examination of the rationality of faith in the existence of God. Traditional arguments both for and against the existence of God are considered, along with pragmatic justifications of faith based on its beneficial consequences.

PHIL 0501 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (QR)
3 cr.
An introduction to the concepts and methods of modern deductive logic. Propositional logic is emphasized, but quantificational logic is touched upon. Prerequisite: MATH 0001 or 0031.

PHIL 0841 SCIENCE AND RELIGION
3 cr.
This introductory undergraduate course addresses two questions: Does the scientific understanding of the world suffer from a kind of incompleteness that can be remedied by the supernaturalist religions? Or is there even a clash between contemporary science and such religion?

PHIL 0850 PHILOSOPHY AND LIBERAL DEMOCRACY
3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to several problems common to philosophers and politics and introduces students to the different theories, modes of argument, and techniques of analysis used by the two disciplines to understand them. It is intended to help students deepen their understanding of the dominant political stance of our society.


PHIL 0891 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY (VARIOUS)
3 cr.
This intensive but introductory-level seminar is reserved for special philosophical topics that do not fit standard course-catalog categories. Issues discussed vary from year to year, but tend to be narrowly focused and specialized.

PHIL 1157 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE
3 cr.
Discussion of various philosophical views of language and the relevance of the study of language to philosophical problems.

PHIL 1245 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
This course will survey major themes in American philosophy, with a concentration on pragmatism. It will begin with a study of early thinkers like Thoreau and Emerson, though the majority of course will be dedicated to the pragmatists Pierce, James and Dewey. The course will conclude with a look at one or more contemporary pragmatists, like Rorty.

PHIL 1370 PHILOSOPHY OF ART
3 cr.
This advanced undergraduate course addresses philosophical problems that arise in connection with art, such as the nature of works of art, the comparison and contrast between representational and non-representational art, the definition of beauty, and special obligations concerning art works.

PHIL 1380 BUSINESS ETHICS
3 cr.
This advanced undergraduate course considers a selection of ethical issues that arise in connection with business needs and practices, such as employer-employee relations, truth in advertising, responsibilities to consumers, fair and unfair competitive practices, environmental effects, contractual obligations, liability for damages, and governmental regulation.

PHIL 1461 EPISTEMOLOGY (THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE)
3 cr.
This course will focus on philosophical theories that attempt to answer the questions “What is knowledge?” and “How does one get knowledge?”  It will examine how claims to know are justified and if such claims are even possible within both scientific and nonscientific contexts. Students will look at the attempts of classical and modern authors to offer analyses and justification of human knowledge over and against the claims of skepticism.

PHIL 1481 METAPHYSICS
3 cr.
This advanced undergraduate course considers a selection of central problems in metaphysics, such as the problems of realism, essentialism, free will, necessity and possibility, substance and property, persistence through time (including person identity), and the nature of truth.

PHIL 1501 SYMBOLIC LOGIC (QR)
3 cr.
This advanced undergraduate course develops skills in formal and informal reasoning in predicate-quantifier logic and covers formal semantics for sentential logic, informal semantics for predicate-quantifier logic, and elementary syntactic metatheory. Prerequisite: MATH 0001 or 0031.

PHIL 1611 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
3 cr.

This is an advanced undergraduate survey of the major problem areas in the philosophy of science. Topics vary somewhat, but generally include many of the following: the nature of explanation, the problem of induction and confirmation, concept formation, scientific methodology, verifiability and falsifiability, the observation theory distinction, scientific realism, law-like form, and theory change.


PHIL 1891 ISSUES IN PHILOSOPHY (VARIOUS)
3 cr.
This intensive, advanced-level seminar is reserved for special philosophical topics that do not fit standard course-catalog categories. Issues discussed vary from year to year but tend to be narrowly focused and specialized.

PHIL 1904 INDEPENDENT STUDY—UNDERGRADUATE
1–9 cr.
This course is a way of offering University credit in philosophy for relevant experiences or work undertaken independently with little or no formal interaction with an instructor.

PHYSICS (PHYS)

 

PHYS 0090 EXPLORATIONS IN PHYSICS
3 cr.
A conceptual introduction to the science of physics as an intellectual endeavor and as a practical basis for understanding the natural and technological world around us. After receiving credit with a grade of "C" or higher for Introduction to Physics I (PHYS 0140) or any higher numbered physics, a student may not enroll in or receive credit (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.

PHYS 0093 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
A study of technology in our world, including the science behind it, its impact on society, and issues arising in regard to its development and implementation. After receiving credit with a grade of "C" or higher for Introduction to Physics I (PHYS 0140) or any higher numbered physics, a student may not enroll in or receive credit (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.

PHYS 0140 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS 1
4 cr.
First semester of non-calculus-based introductory physics. Topics include mechanics, conservation laws, vibrations, waves, and fluid mechanics. Students must be proficient in college algebra and trigonometry.

PHYS 0141 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS 1 LAB
1 cr.
A laboratory illustrating basic experimental techniques and concepts from mechanics, vibrations, waves, and fluids. Corequisite: PHYS 0140.
 
PHYS 0142 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS 2
4 cr.
Second semester of non-calculus-based introductory physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 0140.
 
PHYS 0143 EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS 2
1 cr.
A laboratory illustrating basic concepts from electricity, thermodynamics, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite: 0141; Corequisite: PHYS 0143.

PHYS 0150 PHYSICS 1
4 cr.
First semester of calculus-based physics. Topics include mechanics, conservation laws, fluid mechanics, vibrations, waves, and sound. Corequisite: MATH 0221.

PHYS 0151 PHYSICS LABORATORY 1
1 cr.
A laboratory illustrating basic experimental techniques and basic concepts from mechanics, waves and fluids. Corequisite: PHYS 0150.

PHYS 0152 PHYSICS 2
4 cr.
Second semester of calculus-based physics. Topics include thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, wave optics, and an introduction to relativity and quantum concepts. Prerequisite: PHYS 0150. Corequisite: MATH 0231.

PHYS 0153 PHYSICS LABORATORY 2
1 cr.
A laboratory illustrating basic concepts in vibrations, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 0151; Corequisite: PHYS 0152

PHYS 0400 CLASSICAL MECHANICS
3 cr.
This course covers kinematics and dynamics of point masses with various force laws; central forces, including planetary and satellite motion; conservation laws; systems of particles; accelerating coordinate systems; rigid body motions; topics from Lagrange's formulations of mechanics; and Einstein's special relativity and how it modifies Newtonian mechanics. Prerequisites: MATH 0231 and PHYS 0152.

PHYS 0450 ELECTROMAGNETISM AND OPTICS
3 cr.
This intermediate course begins with a rigorous development of fundamental concepts in electromagnetism, including static electric and magnetic fields, electric potential, capacitance, charged particle motion, and induced EMF. Further topics include Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, wave optics, ray optics, and optical instruments. Prerequisites: MATH 0231 and PHYS 0152.

PHYS 0480 ASTROPHYSICS
3 cr.
This course covers the application of physics to understanding stars, galaxies, and the universe at large. It includes extensive discussion of the blackbody radiation laws, radiative transfer, gravitational statics and dynamics, and the properties of ionized gasses. Prerequisites: MATH 0231 and PHYS 0152.

PHYS 1111 SPECIAL TOPICS
1–4 cr.

Designed to allow students to pursue areas of special interest not included in the regular course offerings.


PHYS 1300 QUANTUM PHYSICS
3 cr.
Breakdown of classical physics, photons and De Broglie waves, Schrodinger's equation, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, atomic physics, molecular bonding and spectra, concepts of statistical mechanics, blackbody radiation, lasers, and solid state physics, with emphasis on semiconductors. Prerequisites: MATH 0231 and PHYS 0152.

PHYS 1400 ADVANCED LABORATORY
1 cr.

Students perform a variety of advanced experiments in physics. No Prerequisite.

POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS)

 

PS 0206 AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS
3 cr.
The course is an introduction to the institutions and processes of the national government. Against a background of the Constitution and the social context of American politics, attention will be given to such topics as voting behavior, public opinion and political attitudes, the party system, the president, the Congress, and the courts.

PS 0210 NATIONAL POLICY MAKING
3 cr.
Examination of the national policy-making process from both political and economic perspectives. Focus on roles played by Congress, the president, and the federal bureaucracy in the federal budget process. Current issues such as the federal deficit, controlling spending, and a balanced budget are also discussed.

PS 0302 COMPARATIVE POLITICS
3 cr.
A study of the governments and politics in Europe with emphasis on comparative analysis focusing on the United Kingdom, Germany, Russia, and the European Union (EU).

PS 0310 COMPARATIVE DEVELOPING SYSTEMS
3 cr.
Comparison of political, economic, and cultural features of nonindustrial, or Third World, political systems. Illustrations drawn from African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and Latin American systems. Emphasis is on factors affecting economic development.

PS 0501 WORLD POLITICS
3 cr.
The purpose of this course is two-fold: first, to increase the students’ awareness of global issues and problems of major political import and, second, to enhance the students’ ability to interpret and analyze the behavior and interrelationships of the actors that deal with these issues and problems.

PS 0601 POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES
3 cr.
Examination of the origins of theories of various political ideologies including liberalism, conservatism, communism, fascism, and various liberation ideologies. Special attention given to the liberal tradition in the United States.

PS 1206 FREE SPEECH IN AMERICA
3 cr.
This course will examine the major dimensions of the First Amendment protections of free speech and press which have been the subject of Supreme Court decisions and provoked extensive political and social controversy. Included are issues of incitement and advocacy, symbolic speech, libel, and obscenity.

PS 1207 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
3 cr.
A study of the interpretation of the Constitution by the Supreme Court in the American political system. Topics include the development of judicial review, civil and political rights, federalism, and national versus state power in the regulation of the economy.

PS 1209 MEDIA, POLITICS, AND THE LAW
3 cr.
Overview of legal issues facing mass media, including freedom of the press, defamation, libel, and privacy. The course will include a discussion of emerging technologies of news gathering/publication and an extension of the discussion of First Amendment issues raised in PS 1206.

PS 1214 U.S. CONGRESS
3 cr.

This course provides an analysis of the legislative process in the United States. The history and meaning of representation is analyzed, as is the behavior of participants in the legislative process. The impact of social and economic forces on decision making in the United States is studied, as are the roles of interest groups, political parties, the executive branch, and the judiciary.


PS 1215 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
3 cr.
The course examines the controversies surrounding the design of the presidency and situates those controversies within the context of debates about the nature of politics, political power, and the state in the founding period. Attention is also given to the political evolution of American government and the presidency, the development of the welfare state, and dilemmas of the modern presidency.

PS 1237 POLITICAL PARTIES AND ELECTIONS
3 cr.
A study of the nature of democratic politics and the role and functions of parties and elections in the American political system. Election field research may be included.

PS 1245 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND POLICY
3 cr.
This course studies the politics surrounding U.S. environmental policies. The history of those policies is examined, as is the role of the president, Congress, courts, and interest groups in the policymaking process. Current issues such as air and water pollution, hazard waste disposal, energy production, and land-use policies are addressed.

PS 1253 THE AMERICAN CITY
3 cr.
Study of the American city through examination of historical, legal, political, geographical, economic, cultural, and literary sources. Emphasis is on the evolution of cities from the colonial period through the present day. Cross-listed as HIST 1253.

PS 1320 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS
3 cr.
This course offers a basic introduction to the dynamics of government in Latin America. The course examines the main political issues of contemporary Latin America, the major forms of government in the region, and the ways in which social groups and classes participate in politics.

 

 

PS 1356 THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF AFRICA
3 cr.
This course examines African politics from the historical legacy of European imperialism to contemporary issues. Topics of focus will include the role of ethnicity, institutions, and ideologies; patterns of change, social forces, global economics and how they have impacted nation building across the continent. PREQ: PS 0302 or 0310 (preferred but not required.

 

 

PS 1344 RUSSIAN/EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS
3 cr.

This course gives an overview of recent Russian political history and the problems of the Russian state; discusses the attempts to reform the Communist political and economic system under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin; and analyzes the collapse of the Soviet Union into independent states, as well as the rejection of Communism in the former USSR and Soviet bloc in East Central Europe (Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, etc.). Particular attention is given to events as they occur. Cross-listed as HIST 1345.


PS 1380 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT SEMINAR
3 cr.
Advanced topics in comparative politics, with emphasis on institutional analysis of both advanced and emerging democracies.

PS 1506 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND PROBLEMS OF WORLD ORDER
3 cr.
Examination of existing methods of achieving world order, particularly international organizations and international law. Consideration of new issues such as terrorism, human rights, north–south politics, and demands for a “new international economic order” that suggest alternative international regimes.

PS 1507 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION
3 cr.
The course will focus on nongovernmental as well as intergovernmental organization and will be concerned with the economic as well as the political aspects of such organization. Throughout the course, international organization will be approached as an arena for both conflict and cooperation. Special emphasis will be on the United Nations.

PS 1515 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to U.S. foreign policy since 1945. It will examine foundations, assumptions, objectives, and patterns of American foreign policy. Theories of international relations, the sources of American foreign policy, and current U.S. foreign policy toward major countries and areas of the world are also considered.

PS 1535 HUMAN RIGHTS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
3 cr.

This course will focus on contemporary human rights as defined by international law. Students will trace the evolution of the Western human rights idea from natural law origins to the present understanding as legitimate claims against government. The course will also discuss alternative conceptions of human rights such as group/ethnic rights as well as economic and social rights. A series of case studies and an analysis of the work of human rights groups such as Amnesty International will highlight the political reality of human rights in the current time.


PS 1700 POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
3 cr.
Focus on design and execution of research projects in political science, including contextual review, question development, data collection and analysis, and presentation of findings. Required of political science majors.

PS 1800 DIRECTED READING
1–4 cr.
Readings on special topics for which courses are not currently offered. Includes tutorial sessions with the instructor and written abstracts of materials assigned.

PS 1810 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

PS 1820 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–3 cr.
Research on special topics for which courses are not currently offered, resulting in an extensive written term project completed under the supervision of departmental faculty.

PS 1830 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Independent study is normally associated with off-campus educational opportunities such as internships or special programs.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

 

PSY 0200 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.
A summary of the present knowledge in areas such as scientific research methods, learning, sensation and perception, the biological basis of behavior, developmental patterns, motivation, emotion, personality, social influences, psychopathology, and psychotherapies. Prerequisite to all other courses in psychology.

PSY 0210 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.
The study of behavior in the social environment. Social psychology concerns the manner in which the behavior, feelings, or thoughts of one individual are influenced or determined by the behavior of and/or characteristics of others. Primary emphasis is on current theories and research in social psychology with applications to problems of society also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 0230 CHILD DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.
Provides an understanding of the basic principles of change as they apply to the development of infants and children. Topics include the relative influences of environmental, hormonal, and genetic factors on physical, socioemotional, and cognitive development. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 0240 THEORIES OF PERSONALITIES
3 cr.
Study of the structure and organization of the normal personality through a survey of basic theoretical viewpoints ranging from psychoanalytic theory to modern social cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 0260 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.
Provides an understanding of the basic principles of human development as applied to the adolescent. Theories and research findings are examined with regard to the areas of physical and sexual development, intelligence and cognitive functioning, and social and emotional development. This course does not count toward a psychology degree. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 0270 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS
4 cr.
Provides a basic understanding of statistical techniques. Includes introduction to experimental design, descriptive statistics, sampling, probability, and inferential statistics. Course involves statistical computations, parametric and nonparametric hypothesis testing, and interpretation of data. Course includes a required weekly laboratory during which students gain hands on experience analyzing data as well as working with statistical and graphing software. Prerequisites: PSY 0200 and a grade of C or better in Math 0002, placement out of Math 0002 or a math SAT score of 545.

PSY 0351 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
3 cr.
Designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the psychological and biological aspects of drugs, emphasizing research findings wherever possible. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 0384 ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
3 cr.

This class is intended to educate students about the biological, social, and psychological changes that occur in people as they progress through the second half of life. In addition to these topics, the class will review the reasons for the increasing need to study and understand these changes, as well as research designs and research-related problems commonly seen in this area. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.


PSY 0470 INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
3 cr.

An introduction to the use of instrumental and classical training procedures in the modification of human behavior. The course covers the theoretical background (including ethical issues), the principles of instrumental and Pavlovian training, the principles of cognitive change, and applications to psychotherapy, education, and self modification.
PREQ: PSY 0200.


PSY 1000 JUNIOR PSYCHOLOGY SEMINAR
0.5 cr.
One hour per week provides a forum for the discussion of professional issues in psychology along with a dissemination of information related to the Department of Psychology and what happens after a student graduates. Required for all psychology majors, preferably during the junior year; two terms, 5 credits per term, are needed for graduation. PREQ: JUNIOR STANDING

PSY 1031 RESEARCH METHODS
4 cr.

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of psychological research, including the nature of psychology as a science, the selection of a research problem, research designs, the nature of research variables, and ethical considerations. Course includes a laboratory involving practical experiences in the design of experiments, conducting experiments, analyzing and interpreting data, and writing research papers. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270.


PSY 1065 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
4 cr.
An examination of the mental activities that constitute human cognition. Topics include perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving and reasoning, artificial intelligence, and animal cognition. The course has an accompanying lab where computer, laboratory, and real-world techniques for studying cognitive processes are demonstrated and practiced. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.     

PSY 1121 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS
4 cr.
This course reviews the rationale and use of many psychological tests. Ethics, report writing, and current issues in testing are covered. Course includes a laboratory that focuses on the application, development, and evaluation of psychological tests, as well as the development of skills in interpreting testing data and assessment reports. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.

PSY 1141 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY
3 cr.
An overview of the etiology and symptomalogical presentation of abnormal behaviors and psychological disorders, as well as a survey of current therapeutic modalities. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 1178 HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 cr.
A survey of biological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexual activity. Cross-listed as BIOL 1178. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.

PSY 1216 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.
A multidisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of a behavioral and a biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness—and the application of this knowledge to diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: PSY 0200 and 0270 and 1031

PSY 1251 MODELS OF PSYCHOTHERAPY
3 cr.
Examination of traditional and contemporary modalities of psychotherapy used (clinically) to treat abnormal behaviors and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 0200 and 1141

PSY 1440 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
3 cr.
Covers basic techniques in the study of human and animal conditioning. Emphasis is given to theory and principles concerning classical and instrumental conditioning. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.

PSY 1500 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.

Covers the neuroscience perspective of psychology with emphasis on the structural and functional organization of the central nervous system and the relationship between brain structure and behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.   


PSY 1531 SEMINAR IN NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR
1 cr.
An examination of current thinking about the correlation between neural activity and behavior using examples from invertebrate and vertebrate simple systems. The role of single neurons and neural networks in controlling animal behavior will be emphasized. Cross-listed as BIOL 1531 An examination of current thinking about the correlation between neural activity and behavior using examples from invertebrate and vertebrate simple systems. The role of single neurons and neural networks in controlling animal behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 1125 or PSY 1500.

PSY 1548 SENIOR PROJECT 1
3 cr.

This course is restricted to students with Psychology as an area of concentration. Senior status and permission of supervisor required.  PREQ: SENIOR STATUS, PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR; OTHER PREREQUISITES MAY BE ADDED DEPENDING ON THE NATURE OF THE PROJECT.


PSY 1549 SENIOR PROJECT 2
3 cr.

This course is restricted to students with Psychology as an area of concentration. Senior status and permission of supervisor required.  PREQ: SENIOR STATUS, PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR; OTHER PREREQUISITES MAY BE ADDED DEPENDING ON THE NATURE OF THE PROJECT.


PSY 1555 INTERNSHIP
1–5 cr.

Participation in supervised psychological activities at off-campus agencies. Particular sites selected to fit student career interests. Requires keeping a journal of daily activities, writing a final term paper relating the internship experience to the Psychology, and making a brief presentation about your internship to the Psychology Seminar class. PREQ: SENIOR STATUS, PERMISSION OF INTERNSHIP DIRECTOR; OTHER PREREQUISITES MAY BE ADDED DEPENDING ON THE INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT.


PSY 1560 INTERNSHIP
6 cr.

Participation in supervised psychological activities at off-campus agencies. Particular sites selected to fit student career interests. Requires keeping a journal of daily activities, writing a final term paper relating the internship experience to the Psychology, and making a brief presentation about your internship to the Psychology Seminar class. PREQ: SENIOR STATUS, PERMISSION OF INTERNSHIP DIRECTOR; OTHER PREREQUISITES MAY BE ADDED DEPENDING ON THE INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT.


PSY 1570 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.

An interdisciplinary examination of the chronological development of the field of psychology. Some time is spent on studying the philosophical underpinnings of the discipline of psychology before moving onto examining the evolution of the schools of thought in psychology. The emphasis is on the relationship of psychology to the fields of history and philosophy, as well as how the schools of thought in psychology fit into the empiricist and rationalist traditions. Open only to junior and senior psychology majors. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.


PSY 1636 ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.

An examination of what psychologists have found out about people at work, the ways in which they have studied the workplace, and how psychology is practiced in human resources and other organizational settings. There is an emphasis on current perspectives and findings in this applied area of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.


PSY 1650 ADVANCED SEMINAR
3 cr.
Intensive study of a specialized area, emphasizing current research and theory. May involve laboratory use of practicum experience. Examples of the special topics seminars are behavioral genetics, organizational psychology, cognitive development, human sexuality, infancy, mental retardation, the normal adult, self-modification, special topics of aging, the superior adolescent, intensive study of a specialized area emphasizing current research and theory. Examples of recent seminars taught include Psychology of Language, Intelligence, Cross-Cultural Psychology, Memory, Neuropsychological Testing, and Artificial Intelligence. Although the Advanced Seminar courses have the same title when listed in the course offerings, the course topic changes with each offering. Because the courses are organized as seminars, the assignments, tests, etc. change each time they are offered, even when taught by the same instructor. Students may take the course more than once for additional credit; however a grade earned in one course may not be replaced by a grade earned in another course, even when taught by the same instructor Prerequisites: PSY 0200, PSY 0270, PSY 1031.

PSY 1651 ADVANCED SEMINARS
4 cr.
Intensive study of a specialized area, emphasizing current research and theory. May involve laboratory use of practicum experience. Examples of the special topics seminars are behavioral genetics, organizational psychology, cognitive development, human sexuality, infancy, mental retardation, the normal adult, self-modification, special topics of aging, the superior adolescent, teaching seminar, neuropathology, and psychopathology of childhood. Prerequisites: 0200, 0270/0280, 1031/1032 and permission of instructor.

PSY 1904 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL READING
1–3 cr.
Under special circumstances, psychology majors can design an individual reading course in consultation with a faculty member. Permission of instructor required.

PSY 1906 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH
1–3 cr.
This course involves student participation in individual experimental research supervised by a member of the department faculty.

 

 

 

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