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Course Description

Note: (QR) denotes quantitative reasoning courses.

HEALTHCARE (HLTHCR)

 

HLTHCR 1050 HEALTH CARE EDUCATION
3 cr.
This course will present the basic principles of education to include objective writing, didactic lab and clinical teaching techniques, and student evaluation as it pertains to health education. This course is restricted to health care majors only. Cross-listed as RESCA 1050.

HLTHCR 1054 HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
This course will present the various aspects of health management to include basic management principles and their application to the ever-changing health care environment. This course is restricted to health care majors only.

HLTHCR 1095 HEALTH CARE INTERNSHIP
3 cr.
Provides advanced students an opportunity to explore in depth an area of particular interest to them. It is the student's responsibility to find a faculty member willing to undertake such a tutorial. This internship will allow the student to explore areas of interest in health care management and education in clinical, administrative, or business environments. The experience will be structured to include a preliminary project description, measurable goals/objectives, and a time line of activities. Evaluation will be based on a journal documenting activities, achievement of goals/objectives, oral and written summations of the experience, and independent evaluation by faculty. This course is restricted to health care majors only. Prerequisites: HRP 1050, HRP 1054.

HLTHCR 1099 INDEPENDENT STUDY
3 cr.
This course is restricted to health care majors only. Provides advanced students an opportunity to explore in depth an area of particular interest related to their health profession.

HLTHCR 1119 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE
3 cr.
This course discusses principles of hospital law and aspects of handling confidential and health records information. Actual cases and statutes are discussed. This course is restricted to health care majors only.

HISTORY (HIST)

 

HIST 0111 HEBREW SCRIPTURE AND CHRISTIAN OLD TESTAMENT
3 cr.
An examination of this body of literature, which two major religions claim as their scriptures. The course includes study of the ancient composition and collection of the documents as well as the two major theological systems built upon them. Cross-listed as RELGST 0111.

HIST 0120 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 1
3 cr.
This course explores the origins of the Western traditions and the changes that occur in the political, social, economic, intellectual, artistic, and other realms over time and with shifts in geographical focus. The course begins with the Bronze Age and ends with the Reformation and the Age of Exploration. Writing skills are emphasized. Students are trained in the writing of essays.

HIST 0130 WESTERN CIVILIZATION 2
3 cr.
Explores the changes that occur in Europe from the Age of Absolutism to the late 20th century. Writing skills are emphasized.

HIST 0424 CLASSICAL EAST ASIA
3 cr.
This course deals with geography, government, society, economy, philosophy, and religions of China, Japan, and Korea from prehistoric times to the 18th century. It emphasizes the role of China and its influence on its neighbors.

HIST 0425 MODERN EAST ASIA
3 cr.
Presents the history of China, Korea, and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries. Traces the Western impact on East Asia and the responses of these states as they become modern.

HIST 0610 UNITED STATES TO 1877
3 cr.
An introductory, lower division course that develops the history of United States from the 1400s through the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIST 0620 UNITED STATES 1877–PRESENT
3 cr.
An introduction to American history from 1877 to the present that emphasizes selected topics on changes in American society and politics as an earlier agrarian society became an industrial-urban one and as the nation took up an ever-larger role in world affairs.

HIST 0753 ORIGINS OF CHRISTIANITY
3 cr.
An examination of the diverse strands of Christianity as developed both in the Christian Bible and outside of it. Cross-listed as RELGST 0753.

HIST 1002 WRITING SEMINAR FOR MAJORS
3 cr.

This course will reinforce the proper techniques of historical research in the development of a major research project. Students are required to write a long research paper or develop another historical application. For history majors only; usually taken during the senior year.


HIST 1011 RELIGION AND EARLY AMERICA
3 cr.

This course examines the role that various religious traditions, Western Christianity, Judaism, Native Americans, and Africans played in creating an American religious tradition in the Colonial period.


HIST 1013 RELIGION AND REFORM IN ANTEBELLUM AMERICA
3 cr
This course examines the history of the Second Great Awakening in America and its attendant impulses toward moral and social reform in American society. Prerequisite: HIST 0610.            

HIST 1113 MEDIEVAL EUROPE: 1100–1500
3 cr.
This course covers the role of nobility, peasantry, church, development of towns, beginnings of nation-states, education, and culture.

HIST 1127 MODERN BRITAIN
3 cr.

A seminar that examines the history of Britain in the 20th century. Topics discussed include the British constitution, Parliament and parties, the monarchy, the economy, social classes, Britain and the two world wars, "the Troubles" in Ulster, the British Commonwealth, Britain and the European Union, and Britain and America.


HIST 1130 MODERN GERMANY 1866–1945
3 cr.
This course covers German history from the foundation of the North German Federation to the present. In addition to the main political changes, considerable attention is given to the evolution of society and to cultural and intellectual life.

HIST 1170 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION
3 cr.
This course covers the revival of classical thought, literature, and art in 14th-  and 15th-century Italy; development of humanism with its secular tendencies and emphasis on the human personality; the northern Renaissance of the 16th century; movements for reform in the church; Luther, Calvin, and the Protestant Reformation; the spread of Protestantism; and the Catholic Reformation (Counter-Reformation).

HIST 1171 THE WORLD SINCE 1945
3 cr.
Analysis of the principal problems of world order in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres, including the role of the superpowers, attempts at social engineering, problems of the newly independent states, and international wars and tensions.

HIST 1253 THE AMERICAN CITY
3 cr.
Study of the American city through examination of historical, legal, political, geographical, economic, cultural, and literary sources. Emphasis is on the evolution of cities from the colonial period through the present day. Cross-listed as PS 1253.
 
HIST 1300 ENGLAND TO 1689
3 cr.

Surveys the development of English social, political, economic and cultural history through the “glorious revolution.”

 
HIST 1305 ENGLAND SINCE 1689
3 cr.
Surveys the development of English social, political, economic and cultural history to the present.

HIST 1342 RUSSIA SINCE 1860
3 cr.
This course covers pre-revolutionary Russia, its social structure, political tensions, beginnings of industrialization, 1905 revolution, Bolshevik Revolution, establishment of the Soviet state, civil war, the Stalin period, World War II, and the post-war "thaw."

HIST 1345 RUSSIAN/EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS
3 cr.

This course gives an overview of recent Russian political history and the problems of the Russian state; discusses the attempts to reform the Communist political and economic system under Khrushchev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin; and analyzes the collapse of the Soviet Union into independent states. It also reviews the rejection of Communism in the former USSR and Soviet bloc in East Central Europe (Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, etc.). Particular attention is given to events as they occur. Cross-listed as PS 1344.


HIST 1346 RUSSIA TO 1860
3 cr.
Examines the social, political, economic, and intellectual developments of Russia from the great reforms of Peter to the emancipation of the serfs in 1861.
 
HIST 1347 RUSSIA SINCE 1860
3cr.

Pre-revolutionary Russia, its social structure, political tensions, beginnings of industrialization, 1905 revolution, Bolshevik revolution and establishment of the Soviet state, Civil War, the Stalin period, World War II and the post war “thaw.”


HIST 1350 EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE
3 cr.
A survey of the origins of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania. Emphasis on these nations' relationships with their powerful neighbors, Russia, Prussia, and Austria. Developments since 1815 are stressed, with particular attention given to World Wars I and II and their aftermath

HIST 1381 EUROPE 1914–1945
3 cr.
History of both western and eastern Europe from World War I through the end of World War II, with emphasis on national and ethnic tensions, the failure of democracy, depression, the growth of fascism, international conflicts, and war.

HIST 1385 EUROPE SINCE 1945
3 cr.
History of western and eastern Europe: the postwar reconstruction, Communism in eastern Europe; Europe in the cold war; economic, social and cultural changes; the Revolutions of 1989.

HIST 1400 UNITED STATES COLONIAL
3 cr.
An upper-division course that develops the history of the North American English colonies from around 1400 through the early 1760s.

HIST 1405 SLAVERY IN AMERICA, 1619–1865
3 cr.

This reading/discussion seminar will consider a variety of issues relating to the enslavement and emancipation of African Americans in Colonial America and the United States, including but not limited to: African origins, the Atlantic slave trade, the middle passage, early Colonial slavery, varieties of Colonial slavery, slaves and free Blacks and the American Revolution, slave religion, slave society, slave families, the politics and law of slavery, slave resistance and rebellions, slaves and free Blacks and the Civil War, Abolitionism, and the Abolition.


HIST 1409 THE EARLY REPUBLIC: UNITED STATES 1783–1815
3 cr.
This course examines the social, ideological, political, diplomatic, geographic, and religious atmosphere that influenced the founding of the United States of America. Completion of HIST 0610 United States to 1877 is recommended before taking this course.

HIST 1410 AMERICAN REVOLUTION 1763–83
3 cr.
An upper-division course that considers the history of revolutionary America between the 1750s and the 1790s.

HIST 1411 ANTEBELLUM AMERICA 1815–48
3 cr.
Examines American history from the Early National Era through the age of the Mexican War through the lenses of political, diplomatic, military, social, gender, racial, and ethnic issues.

HIST 1412 WOMEN AND AMERICAN HISTORY
3 cr.
This upper-division seminar will explore the roles and experiences of women—White and Black, European and Native American, Anglo-Saxon and other ethnicities, wealthy and working class—in the social and political development of America from the Colonial era to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 0610 or HIST 0620.

HIST 1413 AMERICA LABOR HISTORY
3 cr.
This upper-division reading seminar will explore the development and implementation of labor systems and the roles and experiences of American workers within those systems from the Colonial era to the present.

HIST 1414 SUFFRAGE IN AMERICA
3 cr.
A reading, writing, and discussion seminar that focuses on major suffrage movements in American history from the Revolution through the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Class projects include essays, a term paper, and a group voter registration project.

HIST 1415 LEWIS & CLARK AND THE INDIANS
3 cr.
Exploration of the ideas, myths, and realities about the American West around the birth of the Republic as seen through the prism of the famed Lewis & Clark expedition. A reading seminar focusing on issues of physical expansion, Native American and foreign relations, trade, national defense, slavery, multiculturalism, and the environment.

HIST 1416 AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY TO 1877
3 cr.
Exploration of women’s themes in American history, including changing expectations of gender roles, evolving nature of work and family life, race relations and ethnic differences, and the participation of women in important social and political movements.

HIST 1417 AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY SINCE 1877
3 cr.
Continuation of topics covered in History 1416.
 
HIST 1419 AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS
3 cr.

The course emphasizes three significant periods of development: (a) the period of origins, 1775-1825; (b) the period of hesitant entry onto the international scene, 1890-1941; and (c) the period of full participation in international affairs, 1941-present. In the process the course endeavors to demonstrate the changing role of such concepts as security, neutrality, isolationism, expansionism, and intervention in the evolution of the nation’s conduct in foreign affairs.


HIST 1430 CIVIL WAR HISTORY
3 cr.
This is an upper-division course that considers the impact of the Civil War upon the development of the United States.

HIST 1505 FILM AND HISTORY
3 cr.
A seminar on the moving visual image as historical artifact. Examines the impact of film and video on the historical profession. Seeks to provide expertise in the technologies of filmmaking required for scholarly use of visual resources.

HIST 1520 WORLD WAR II
3 cr.
A detailed study of the causes and course of the second world war (the first of two sequential courses). Diplomacy, military strategy and tactics, the “home front” in the United States, and historical interpretations are examined.

HIST 1521 THE PACIFIC WAR
3 cr.
An examination of the conflict between the United States (and its allies) and the empire of Japan, 1941–45. Both American and Japanese perspectives are explored.

HIST 1523 WORLD WAR II FILM SEMINAR
3 cr.
This is an upper-level seminar designed to coordinate with HIST 1520 World War II. It examines the films produced during the second world war that contain a war information message, illustrates visually the subjects studied in the World War II course, and provides a laboratory for the study of the visual image as historical artifact.

HIST 1530 THE U.S. AND THE COLD WAR
3 cr.
The second of two sequential courses. Examines the deterioration of the wartime cooperation of the United Nations, “atomic diplomacy,” the Berlin crisis, the Korean War, and the institutionalization of Cold War diplomacy through the 1950s and 1960s.

HIST 1535 COLD WAR CULTURES
3 cr.
This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the Cold War in the United States, emphasizing themes such as civil rights and civil liberties, the McCarthy period, the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, the Vietnam war, the rise of the new left and the new right, the Reagan presidency, and the fall of the Soviet empire. Prerequisite: HIST 0620.

HIST 1538 RACE RELATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES
3 cr.
This course explores race relations in the United States from the Civil War to the present. Topics include the reconstruction era, the evolution of racial segregation laws and traditions, social Darwinism and imperialism, race relations and the two world wars, the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, black power, the American Indian movement, and current debates over affirmative action policies. Prerequisite: HIST 0620

HIST 1600 POSTWAR JAPAN
3 cr.
An exploration of the social, political, economic, and industrial elements that allowed the Japanese to create an economic superpower on a resource-poor archipelago. Using an historical framework, the course will concentrate on the post-World War II era.

HIST 1602 RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD
3 cr.
A seminar that examines the origins, identities, and theological conceptions of the major non-Judeo-Christian religious traditions. The course of study includes the scriptures, cultural contexts and worship practices of these religions as well as the intimate relationship of religion to other aspects of human behavior.

HIST 1603 JUDAISN, CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM
3 cr.
This is a study of the beliefs and practices of the three major monotheistic religions. The course examines the historical origins, development, theological concepts and worship practices of what are sometimes called "the Abrahamic faiths". It emphasizes the distinct character of each religion as well as variations within each, and seeks to discern continuity and differences among the three. This course is designed to be a companion to History/Relgst 1602, Religions of the World - to provide a more searching treatment of the Western religious traditions. The approach combines elements of a seminar, in which student preparation and participation are important, with lecture segments and also makes significant use of video and Web-based resources.

HIST 1605 RECONSTRUCTION AND REFORM, 1865–1916
3 cr.
This course examines the long-range impact of the northern victory in the Civil War: the restructuring of the economy of the United States, business expansion, the rise of finance capitalism, and various reform movements.

HIST 1613 PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA
3 cr.
This course traces the revolutionary process that brought the Communist Party of China to power. Changes that have occurred socially, politically, and economically are explored, as are the relations with the countries of Asia, the United States, and various international bodies.

HIST 1617 UNITED STATES IN THE 1960S
3 cr.
This course explores American politics, culture, and society in the 1960s. Topics include the "Camelot" years of the Kennedy administration, the great society, the Vietnam war at home, the civil rights movement and the rise of the new left and women's liberation movements, rock and roll, the sexual revolution and the counterculture, and the emergence of new age spirituality. Prerequisite: HIST 0620 or HIST 0601.

HIST 1620 THE VIETNAM WAR
3 cr.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with American involvement in Southeast Asia, in particular with the Second Indochina War. Some attempt will be made to provide a background of Vietnamese historical and cultural perspective. The major portion of the course will focus on American policy—at home and abroad—and the manner in which five American presidents tried to deal with the “Indochina problem.”

HIST 1679 MEXICO
3 cr.
Mexican history from the Aztecs to the present. Students will discuss the conquest, the Colonial era, the struggle for independence, 19th-century liberalism, the Porfirian dictatorship, the 20th-century revolution, the formation of a single-party state, the temptations of socialism, the oil boom, the debt crisis, and the “crisis of the system” now being experienced by Mexico.

HIST 1682 NATIVE AMERICANS AND EARLY AMERICAN
3 cr.
This course examines the history of the contact of Native American and Western cultures from the Age of Exploration to the present day.

HIST 1771 THE HOLOCAUST
3 cr.
This course treats the historical, political, and economic factors that led up to the destruction of the European Jews during the Nazi period, followed by analysis of the actual process as it occurred in Germany and the countries allied with, or occupied by, Germany in World War II.
 
HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY
3cr.
An examination of the foundation of Christianity in Roman times and its worldwide diffusion up to the present. The emergence of differing Christian identities, the experiences of Christians in various societies, and the role of Christianity in significant social and political development in the West are emphasized.

 

 

HIST 1800 DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

HIST 1810 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

HIST 1820 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

HIST 1830 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity usually off campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

INSTRUCTION AND LEARNING (I&L)

 

I&L 0005 COLLEGE STUDY STRATEGIES
3 cr.
Topics include goal setting, time management, note-taking, text marking, getting motivated, improving concentration, improving memory, reducing test anxiety, and strategies for preparing for and taking exams. This course is designed for freshmen and sophomores only.

I&L 0009 THEORY/PRACTICE OF PEER TUTORING
1 cr.
Provides students the opportunity to learn about the theoretical and methodological foundations of peer tutoring. Recommended for students interested in working as peer tutors and helpers. Grading using H/S/U or a letter grade is at the discretion of the instructor.

I&L 0010 DIRECTED PRACTICUM IN ADOLESCENT SOCIAL COMPETENCE
1 cr.
Provides an opportunity to combine professional training and coursework on adolescent social life with fieldwork with middle school students. Students receive background training in working with teens in large groups. They then work directly with middle school students leading workshops on peer pressure, popularity, social groups, and bullying. Admission is by permission of the instructor only. Enrollment is determined on the basis of a screening process with preference given to mature, highly motivated and responsible students with good academic records.

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (IT)

 

IT 0010 DIRECTED TUTORING IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Provides education majors with tutoring experiences in area school districts or other field areas. Admission to course by permission of instructor only.

IT 0011 DIRECTED PRACTICUM IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Provides individual education majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member with teaching or curriculum projects. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

IT 0012 DIRECTED STUDY IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
1–3 cr.

Provides individual education majors the opportunity to explore in-depth specific topics in education. Admission by permission of the instructor only.


IT 0013 DIRECTED RESEARCH IN INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Provides individual education majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member with research projects. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

IT 0099 WEB PAGE DESIGN
1 cr.
This course covers the technical and design issues related to the creation and maintenance of quality pages on the World Wide Web. Admission by permission of the instructor only.

IT 1101 EDUCATION FOR AN INFORMATION AGE
2 cr.
The computer is becoming an indispensable tool for teaching and learning as computers with considerable capabilities proliferate in K–12 schools. In this course, the student will learn about computing in general and about computer-based education in particular. The course will examine other tools available to teachers, such as digital cameras, scanners, and so forth. The accompanying labs will emphasize hands-on learning of these teacher tools. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level elementary or secondary education program.

IT 1103 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
2 cr.
The course will give the elementary education preservice teacher the opportunity to become familiar with instructional  technology appropriate for use in elementary education teaching and learning. The student will extend the skills and broaden the concepts learned in IT 1101 with an emphasis on elementary education. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software designed for use in the classroom, and to use the computer as a communications tool. This will involve Web-based and other multimedia project work. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level elementary education program, IT 1101.
 
IT 1105 INTERACTIVE ONLINE LEARNING        
2 cr.

This course will give education majors who have completed the required introductory instructional technology course the opportunity to extend their computing skills in the area of interactive, web-based learning systems.  Prerequisite:  IT 1101.

 
IT 1145 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION—ENGLISH
2 cr.
Computers are making a dramatic impact on teaching and learning. This course deals with how to use the computer and related technologies in the secondary education English classroom. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software designed for use in the secondary education classroom, to use the computer as a local and global communications tool, and to develop materials that incorporate communications technology for the teaching of English. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper level secondary education English program, IT 1101.

IT 1161 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION—SOCIAL STUDIES
2 cr.

This course will give the student the opportunity to become familiar with instructional technology appropriate for secondary education social studies. The student will extend the skills and broaden the concepts learned in IT 1101 with an emphasis on social studies education. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software designed for use in the classroom, and to use the computer as a communications tool. This will involve Web-based and other multimedia project work relevant to the social studies classroom. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level citizenship education program, IT 1101.


IT 1165 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION—SCIENCE
2 cr.
This course will give the student the opportunity to become familiar with instructional technology appropriate for secondary education science. The student will extend the skills and broaden the concepts learned in IT 1101 with an emphasis on science education. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software designed for use in the secondary science classroom, and to use the computer as a communications tool. This will involve Web-based and other multimedia project work relevant to the science classroom. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary biology, chemistry, or Earth & space programs, IT 1101.

IT 1171 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION—MATH
1 cr.
This course will allow the student to become familiar with instructional technology appropriate for secondary education mathematics. The student will extend the skills and broaden the concepts learned in IT 1101 with an emphasis on mathematics education. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software, to use the computer as a local and global communications tool, and to develop materials that incorporate communications technology for the teaching of mathematics. The course will involve Web-based and other multimedia projects. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level secondary education mathematics program, IT 1101.
 

IT 1172 CALCULATORS IN MATH INSTRUCTION                                            

1 cr.

This course is designed to provide prospective mathematics teachers with expertise in the appropriate use of calculators, including graphing calculators, for teaching mathematics at the secondary level. Pedagogical and content knowledge are integrated within the context of technology usage and discussion of current reform efforts and issues.  Prerequisite:  IT 1101.

 
IT 1181 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION
2 cr.
This course will give the secondary education preservice teacher the opportunity to become familiar with instructional technology appropriate for use in secondary education teaching and learning. The student will extend the skills and broaden the concepts learned in IT 1101 with an emphasis on secondary education. The student will learn to use computers for instructional purposes, to evaluate educational software, and to use the computer as a communications tool. This will involve Web-based and other multimedia project work relevant to the secondary education classroom. This course is offered in the fall term only for those students who are unable to take the discipline-specific IT follow-up course offered in the spring. Students must be admitted to an upper-level secondary education program, have taken IT 1101, and have the permission of their advisors.

ITALIAN (ITAL)

 

ITAL 1181 DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY
3 cr.
A reading of Dante's Divine Comedy in English using a bilingual edition.

JOURNALISM (JOURNL)

 

JOURNL 0053 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM
3 cr.
A course designed to provide both philosophical and historical foundations for consumers of mass media and those wishing to practice journalism. Provides an overview of American journalism—its underlying philosophies, history, theories, functions, and ethics.

JOURNL 1132 REPORTING 1
3 cr.
A course in news gathering and reporting with coverage of Richland Township supervisors' meetings or in-class exercises. Students are called upon to produce a range of journalistic writing, including hard news and human interest stories. Emphasis is on deadline writing, reporter initiative, and clear and concise writing in Associated Press style.

JOURNL 1133 MAGAZINE WRITING
3 cr.
Students produce four or five magazine articles. Emphasis is on student ideas and Associated Press style. Interviewing and information-gathering skills are developed. The objective is publication with research of magazine markets.

JOURNL 1134 FEATURE WRITING
3 cr.
Students produce weekly feature articles based on their ideas using Associated Press style. Emphasis on student initiative and writing skills, including analysis of the best of American journalism. Consistent productivity is tested.

JOURNL 1135 EDITORIAL WRITING
3 cr.
Designed to introduce journalism students to an area of specialization in communications—the editorial. Emphasis is on writing opinion for newspaper and electronic media and discussion of editorial policy making; the means of persuasion; and the roles of syndicated and local columns, editorial cartoons, letters to the editor; and journals of opinion.

JOURNL 1136 COPYREADING/EDITING
3 cr.
A workshop in which students receive editing and headline-writing experience of the type they would receive in a daily newspaper newsroom. The emphasis is on practical application, with deadlines and demands for accuracy in a job that is consistently in demand.

JOURNL 1137 NEWSPAPER LAYOUT/DESIGN
3 cr.
Students study and use a variety of newspaper layout-makeup styles in this workshop. Speed, accuracy, and imagination are combined to produce attractive, readable page designs.

JOURNL 1138 REPORTING 2
3 cr.
A rigorous course in which the students accept responsibility for beat coverage. Students produce two stories per week with  a minimum of errors. Emphasis on productivity, initiative, and error-free writing under deadline pressure using Associated Press style. Prerequisite: JOURNL 1132.

JOURNL 1140 PHOTOGRAPHY IN COMMUNICATIONS
3 cr.
A workshop in newspaper photography emphasizing coordination with writers and editors, artistic aspects, productivity, and darkroom development.

JOURNL 1142 JOURNALISM PRACTICUM
1 cr.

Award of academic credits based on experience. Course available to members of The Advocate, WUPJ radio station, editorial staff of Backroads, and staff of the UPJ yearbook, with faculty consultation. S/U grading system, with evaluation by editors and faculty. Maximum of 6 credits may be counted toward graduation, and only 1 credit per term will be awarded.


JOURNL 1143 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The content of courses offered under this heading varies.

JOURNL 1144 PUBLIC RELATIONS 1
3 cr.

Students study the concepts and practices of internal and external public relations. Along with contemporary theory, the course stresses writing, communication, layout, and design.  Writing skills expected.


JOURNL 1145 BROADCAST JOURNALISM
3 cr.
Students are introduced to broadcast journalism through traditional classroom instruction and writing of stories for radio and television formats.

JOURNL 1146 PUBLIC RELATIONS 2
3 cr.
Students study public relations taking a problem-solving approach. The workshop method enables students to acquire hands-on experience in various public relations duties. Prerequisite: JOURNL 1144.

JOURNL 1147 THE MEDIA AND THE LAW
3 cr.
A study of the legal framework in which the mass media law operates. Recommended for journalism majors, but open to all interested students.

JOURNL 1171 CONFERENCE IN WRITING
3 cr.
Students are required to produce a 12,000-word writing project, a portion or all of which will be submitted for publication. Journalism students are required to write nonfiction projects, which might include a series of newspaper stories, one or more magazine articles, or a lengthy investigative reporting project. Non-journalism students may submit works of fiction (short stories, novel, etc.). Independent study format. Senior status required.

JOURNL 1173 INTERNSHIP
3–12 cr.
Three-, 6-, 9-, and 12-credit journalism internships have been established with area media, businesses, and organizations in order to provide a practical experience to supplement the academic program. Six internship credits may be applied to the journalism major. The credit value of each internship program is determined by the number of working hours involved.

 

 

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