University of Pittsburgh Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us
JOHNSTOWN BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 

Course Description

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (ECED)

 

 

ECED 1101 FOUNDATIONS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION    
  3 cr.
This course has several distinct components, foundations of early childhood education, curriculum models and approaches, and assessment and instructional practices in early childhood education. Facilities management, development, and administration of early childhood programs will be introduced. In addition, professionalism in the field of early childhood education will be stressed. Prerequisites: PSY 0230 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1111 ECED FIELD PRACTICUM I
2 cr.
This course involves both classroom time and field experiences in a pre-kindergarten through 4th grade. The major emphasis in this course is devoted to creative expression in early childhood education. Students are expected to spend one day per week in a classroom for seven to eight weeks. Students will also be given extensive experiences with students who have special needs. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1112 ECED FIELD PRACTICUM II
2 cr
This course involves both classroom time and field experiences in a pre-kindergarten through 4th grade. It is the second of three field experiences prior to student teaching. The focus of this course is classroom management strategies. Students are expected to be able to develop an effective learning environment. Specific requirements related to this course will be distributed at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to spend one day per week in a classroom for seven to eight weeks. Students will also be given extensive experiences with students who have special needs. Prerequisites: ECED 1111 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1113 ECED FIELD PRACTICUM III
3 cr.
This course involves both classroom time and field experiences in a pre-kindergarten through 4th grade. It is the third of three field experiences prior to student teaching. The foci of this course are curriculum, assessment, and professional collaboration. Specific requirements related to this course will be distributed at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to spend one day per week in a classroom for seven to eight weeks. Students will also be given extensive experiences with students who have special needs. Prerequisites: ECED 1112 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1123 WRITING DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.
This course deals with the writing process in young children and how these processes evolve in conjunction with language acquisition and development. In addition, approaches for facilitating writing process development and scaffolding on reading and speaking functions of young children’s language use will be emphasized. Prerequisites: ECED 1151 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1142 EMERGENT LITERACY
3 cr.
This course has two distinct components. The first part of the course deals with instructional and assessment strategies for young children in stages of emergent literacy. The second part of the course introduces early childhood education majors to literature for emergent readers. Strategies for introducing emergent readers to a variety of literacy genres will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1151 EARLY LANGUAGE & LITERATURE
3 cr.
This course deals with literacy development in the early years. Early childhood literacy education will be focused upon. Promotion of print-rich environments and interactive literacy experiences will be explored.  Language and literacy acquisition will be introduced. In addition, selection and utilization of quality children’s literature in the early childhood classroom will be addressed. Prerequisites: PSY 0230 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1153 LITERACY IN THE PRIMARY GRADES
3 cr.
This course emphasizes reading and writing as developmental cognitive processes. Based on that understanding, students will explore the types of instruction, materials, and resources that can support children in learning about language and print. Students will be introduced to learning theories, research, philosophies, and instructional practices related to literacy in the primary grades, from kindergarten through grade three. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
 
3 cr.
ECED 1154 DIFFERENTIAL READING 
This course emphasizes differentiation in literacy instruction. Students will be introduced to learning theories, research, philosophies, and instructional practices related to a developmental approach to teaching reading and writing in early childhood education. Specifically, students will learn how to assess their students, analyze assessments, and teach to learners’ strengths and needs. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1162 INTEGRATING THE CREATIVE ARTS
3 cr.
This course is designed to help students learn to effectively integrate art, drama, and other forms of creative expression into the early childhood classroom.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1171 SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & HEALTH 
3 cr.
This course is designed help students develop the content, processes, and methodology necessary to teach pre-K – 4 science, technology, and health concepts. Students will demonstrate specific competencies related to planning, implementation, and evaluation of effective classroom instruction. Prerequisites: NATSC 0080 (Integrated Sciences) and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1172 MATHEMATICS FOUNDATION
3 cr.
This course is designed to provide the theoretical background, the pedagogical and psychological concepts, and the field-based experience necessary for planning, implementing, and assessing a numbers and mathematics program in a contemporary early childhood setting. Students will be introduced to a variety of instructional approaches and materials with particular emphasis on teaching about numbers and mathematics through problem solving and active learning. Prerequisites: MATH 0071, MATH 0080, and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1173 SOCIAL STUDIES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
3 cr.
This course is designed to provide the theoretical background, the pedagogical and psychological concepts, and the field-based experience necessary for planning, implementing, and assessing a social studies program in a contemporary early childhood setting. Students will be introduced to a variety of instructional approaches for facilitating the learning of content and skills drawn from the social sciences and for integrating this learning with other areas of the curriculum. Prerequisites: GEOG 0810; HIST 0610 or HIST 0620; and admission to the upper-level program.
 
ECED 1174 PRE-PRIMARY STUDENT TEACHING
7 cr. 
This is a full-time experience for teacher-certification candidates in a student-teaching center at a pre-school. It provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in a pre-school setting with professional backup from University supervisors and experienced master teachers. Pre-school sites are within 15 to 20 miles from the college; students are placed in established sites only. Prerequisites: ECED 1113 and admission to the upper level program.
 
ECED 1183 ENGAGING YOUNG CHILDREN IN LEARNING (C & I)  
3 cr.
This course is taken during the term just prior to student teaching. Students are expected to use information learned in earlier courses and apply it to the creation of developmentally appropriate early childhood curriculum and instruction. Emphasis will be placed on issues if safety, guidance, organization, assessment, and the creation of materials and activities that foster the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains of children in early childhood education. Prerequisites: ECED 1112 and admission to the upper-level program.
 
7 cr.
ECED 1184 PRIMARY STUDENT TEACHING 
This is a full-time experience for teacher-certification candidates in a student-teaching center at an elementary school, grades K – 4. It provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in an elementary school setting with professional backup from University supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are within 15 to 20 miles from the college; students are placed in established sites only. This course is speaking enhanced.  Prerequisites: ECED 1113 and admission to the upper level program.
 
ECED 1190 FAMILY & SCHOOL COLLABORATION
3 cr.
This course pertains to family, school, and community collaboration partnerships. Establishing and maintaining partnerships with families will be addressed. Supporting the development of problem-solving strategies and fostering participation of children in the academic and social context of the classroom will be explored. Involving families and maintaining instructional goals and objectives with Pennsylvania’s learning standards will be introduced.  Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.
   

ECED 1193 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

3 cr.
This course is directed at addressing the professional development of the teacher. Topics covered include classroom management, school law, teaching styles, certification, tenure, school environment, curriculum, professional associations, and the teaching-learning environment. The course will make use of case studies and other approaches to information on the role of being a classroom teacher. The course is designed to provide finishing preparation for student teaching and the necessary knowledge and skills to begin a successful teaching career. Prerequisites: ECED 1112 and admission to the upper-level program.
   
ECED 1194 ECED STUDENT TEACHING SEMINAR
    1 cr.
This course is designed to provide the student teacher with basic elements of professional development and career opportunities. Emphasis is on professionalism, interviewing, résumés, portfolios, professional meetings, and other appropriate topics. Corequisite: ECED 1174, ECED 1184.

 

Note: (QR) denotes quantitative reasoning courses.

ECONOMICS (ECON)

 

ECON 0105 INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMIC THEORY
3 cr.
Uses basic economic principles to explain how markets work, how firms and consumers make decisions, how they interact in product and factor markets, and how these markets determine prices, output, wages, and profits. These principles are also used to analyze issues of current concern in public policy and to decide whether, when, and how government should intervene in the operation of the market.

ECON 0115 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMIC THEORY
3 cr.
Applies the basic principles of economics to the problems of instability associated with business cycles, unemployment, and inflation as well as the problem of economic growth and examines the role of government in promoting stability and economic growth.

ECON 0231 PUBLIC FINANCE
3 cr.
Applies basic economic principles to determine the economic effects of government taxing and spending decisions. Develops the student's ability to analyze issues and recognize the value judgments that lie behind public policy debates. Analyzes tax incidence, the excess burden (or deadweight loss of taxation), and the trade-off between equity and efficiency. Prerequisite: ECON 0105.

ECON 0281 INTRODUCTION TO MONEY AND BANKING
3 cr.
Covers the role of money and financial intermediaries in the U.S. economy and examines what role government has played and should play as regulator of the financial sector and money supply. Prerequisite: ECON 0115.

ECON 0401 LABOR AND THE ECONOMY
3 cr.
An introductory survey of contemporary labor market developments and issues. Readings and lectures emphasize an analytical approach supplemented by historical and institutional applications. Prerequisite: ECON 0105.

ECON 0501 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
3 cr.

An introduction to the basic issues of international economics and to the historical evolution and institutional structure of the international economy. Topics include mercantilism, comparative advantage as a basis for trade, the impact of trade on income distribution, the evolution of the international financial system, and the working of the international gold standard. Prerequisite: ECON 0105.


ECON 1011 AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY
3 cr.

A survey of American economic growth from Colonial times to the New Deal and beyond. Particular attention is paid to economic policy. Topics include mercantilism and the origins of the Revolution, the economic dimension of the Constitution, Jacksonian democracy and the Bank War, the economics of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, tariff policy and industrialization, populism and progressivism, and the business cycle in historical perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 0105 or ECON 0115.


ECON 1101 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
3 cr.

An in-depth examination of price theory. Topics include theories of consumer behavior, production theory, the theory of the firm and market behavior, income distribution theory, and general equilibrium theory. Prerequisites:ECON 0105, MATH 0121 or MATH 0221.


ECON 1111 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
3 cr.
A rigorous treatment of macroeconomic problems such as the business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. Topics include the microeconomic foundation of aggregate consumption and savings behavior, equilibrium and disequilibrium models of the macroeconomy, rational expectations and real business cycles, cycle models, and growth theory. Prerequisites: ECON 0105, MATH 0121 or 0221 or 0231.

ECON 1141 ECONOMIC FORECASTING
3 cr.
Regression and time series techniques applied to forecasting financial and macroeconomic variables such as interest rates, exchange rates, stock prices, gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, and unemployment rates. Prerequisite: STAT 1040.

ECON 1151 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS
3 cr.
Studies in valuation of corporate stocks using fundamental and psychological methods, measurement of risk, and technical analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 0115, STAT 1040.

ECON 1370 ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3 cr.
Examines the relationship between the economy and the environment, broadly defined. The theory of externalities and the role of property rights are emphasized in developing a framework for evaluating public policy proposals affecting the environment. Prerequisite: ECON 0105.

ECON 1471 LAW AND ECONOMICS
3 cr.
This course examines the law and legal rules from an economic perspective and applies economic reasoning to a number of legal topics such as property rights, contracts, torts, the efficiency of the common law, and crime. Prerequisite: ECON 0105.

ECON 1800 DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
Students must undertake a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students must write a paper (or papers) using economic analysis to demonstrate their understanding of the problem and the principles involved in solving it. Must have senior status to enroll.

ECON 1810 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Current topics of particular interest to economics majors are discussed and analyzed in a seminar-style format. Must have senior status to enroll.

ECON 1830 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Students must undertake a defined task of research under the direct supervision of a faculty member, the fruits of which are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, or other appropriate form. Must have senior status to enroll.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (EDPSY)

 

EDPSY 0006 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
3 cr.

Deals with the psychological aspects of the educational process. Theories and research from both psychology and educational psychology are examined in the areas of cognitive and social development, individual differences, culture, cognitive processes, learning, motivation, classroom management, and measurement. Prerequisite: PSY 0200.


EDPSY 0007 STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
1 cr.

Designed primarily for pre-service teachers, this course provides an introduction to serving special needs students in the public schools. Topics include characteristics of various special needs populations as well as laws and policies that affect how they are served in the schools. Case studies are used extensively throughout the course. Prerequisite: PSY 0200. Corequisite: EDPSY 0006.


EDPSY 0008 INCLUSION STRATEGIES
2 cr.
Designed primarily for pre-service teachers, this course familiarizes students with basic strategies for making appropriate accommodations in the regular classroom setting for students with special needs. The course content builds on the characteristics of various special needs populations and on the laws and policies of serving those populations as introduced in prior courses. Prerequisites: PSY 0200, EDPSY 0006, and EDPSY 0007.

EDPSY 0009 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
1 cr.
Designed primarily for pre-service teachers, this course familiarizes students with basic materials, resources, and strategies for making appropriate accommodations in the regular classroom setting for students whose primary language is not English. Prerequisites: PSY 0200 and EDPSY 0006.

EDPSY 0011 DIRECTED PRACTICUM IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Provides education and other majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member on teaching or curriculum projects. Admission to this course by permission of the instructor only.

EDPSY 0013 DIRECTED RESEARCH IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Provides education and other majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member on research projects. Admission to this course by permission of the instructor only.
   
EDPSY1021 STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
3 cr.
This provides an introduction to the field of special education for children and adolescents. It covers the history of special education and how the field has developed. Special needs that are covered include learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, speech and language disorders, sensory impairments, severe emotional disorders, neurological disorders, autism, physical disabilities, health impairments, traumatic brain injury, multiple disabilities, and giftedness. Topics include the characteristics of students with special needs, identification and assessment, making appropriate adaptations and accommodations, and other educational practices
   
EDPSY1025 INCLUSION STRATEGIES
2 cr.
Designed primarily for the pre-service teachers, this course familiarizes students with basic strategies for making age-appropriate accommodations and adaptations for students with special needs in the inclusion classroom. The course provides students with both general adaptation and accommodation strategies and more focused strategies most appropriate for specific special needs populations. Corequisite: EDPSY 1021.
 
2 cr.
EDPSY 1026 ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS  

Designed primarily for pre-service teachers, this course familiarizes students with basic materials, resources, and strategies for making appropriate adaptations and accommodations in the classroom for students whose first language is not English. The course will also cover the characteristics of English language learners and methods for performing effective non-discriminatory assessment. Prerequisite: EDPSY 0006.

   
EDPSY 1121 EDUC ASSESS FOR INCL CLASSROOM
3 cr.

This course is designed for pre-service and in-service teachers. Topics include basic descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, variation, and form; correlation; and graphing data. The course will also cover an introduction to both classical and recent measurement theory, including reliability and validity, testing, and evaluation. The emphasis will be on developing and evaluating classroom assessment methods e.g., screening, diagnostic, formative, summative, authentic) used in data-based decision making processes appropriate for diverse student populations and educational settings.


EDPSY 1130 INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION
3 cr.

Survey of the field of special education for children, adolescents, and adults, including mental retardation, learning disabilities, emotional disorders, communication disorders, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, health problems, and giftedness. Topics to be covered include definitions, etiology, identification, and current educational practices.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (EET)

 

EET 0010 BASIC ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Circuits 1 Basic Electrical Technology. Corequisite: EET 0110.

EET 0021 ELECTRONICS 1 LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Electronics 1. PREQ: EET 0010 and 0110 Corequisite: EET 0121.

EET 0110 CIRCUITS 1 BASIC ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY
3 cr.
Introduction to circuit elements; resistance, inductance, capacitance, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws; basic techniques of DC and AC circuits analysis, loop and node equations; AC network problems; three-phase AC; magnetics; and transformers. Corequisites: PHYS 00152 or 0175 and 0153 and MATH 0231 or 0230.

EET 0111 CIRCUITS 2
4 cr.
Continuation of introductory circuits concepts with emphasis on transient analysis, Laplace transforms, and Fourier analysis. Prerequisite: EET 0110 and 0010; MATH 1035 Differential Equations with Matrix Theory is recommended as a corequisite.

EET 0121 ELECTRONICS 1
3 cr.
Basic theoretical and practical principles of solid-state devices and their application to fundamental electronic circuits, such as power supplies and small-signal amplifiers. Emphasis is placed on analysis and design of linear circuits. Prerequisite: EET 0110 and 0010; Corequisite: EET 0021.

EET 1022 ELECTRONICS 2 LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Electronics 2. PREQ: EET 0021 Corequisite: EET 1122.

EET 1032 MICROPROCESSOR LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Microprocessors. . PREQ: EET 1061 or 1161. Corequisite: EET 1132.

EET 1042 POWER AND MACHINERY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Power and Machinery. PREQ: EET 0010 and 0110; Corequisite: EET 1142.

EET 1051 ELECTRICAL MACHINES LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Electrical Machines. . PREQ: EET 0010 and 0110; Corequisite: EET 1151.

EET 1052 POWER SYSTEMS 1 LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Power Systems 1. PREQ: EET 1151 or 1051; Corequisite: EET 1152.

EET 1061 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Digital Electronics. PREQ: EET 0021; Corequisite: EET 1161.

EET 1065 CONTROL METHODS LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Control Methods. . PREQ: EET 1151 or 1051; Corequisite: EET 1165.

EET 1071 COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory will accompany Communication Systems lecture . . PREQ: EET 1122 or 1022; Corequisite: EET 1171.

EET 1072 ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS LAB             
1 cr.

To learn and apply the basic theory of electromagnetism by modeling and simulations. PREQ: EET 1171; CREQ: 1172.


EET 1075 ADVANCED DIGITAL SYSTEMS LAB
1 cr.
A laboratory to accompany advanced digital systems design. A variety of CPLD and FPGA design experiments will be conducted. PREQ: EET 1132 or 1032 and 1161 or 1061; CREQ: 1175.

EET 1122 ELECTRONICS 2
3 cr.
Frequency analysis of cascaded amplifiers. Large-signal amplifiers, heat sinking, distortion analysis, circuit efficiencies, differential and operational amplifiers, feedback, active filters, and oscillators. Circuit design and analysis are emphasized. Prerequisites: EET 0121, EET 0111. Corequisite: EET 1022.

EET 1123 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
4 cr.

Application of linear and nonlinear solid state devices to circuits and control systems for power supply regulation, direct current silicone-controlled rectifier (DC SCR) motor controls, alternating current (AC) variable speed motor controls, and inverters, induction heating with radio frequency, electro optics, high voltage power supplies, and TV circuits. Prerequisite: EET 1122 and 1022.


EET 1132 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS
3 cr.
Introduction of microprocessors and microcomputer systems through the study of their hardware and software. Topics include processor architectures, instruction sets, interfacing, interrupts, and assembly language programming. PREQ: EET 1161; Corequisite: EET 1032.

EET 1142 POWER AND MACHINERY
3 cr.

Electromechanical energy conversion, torque and power; alternating-current (AC) and direct-current (DC) rotating machines; power distribution; basic electronics; and introduction to solid state power control. Prerequisite: EET 0110 and 0010; Corequisite: EET 1042.


EET 1151 ELECTRICAL MACHINES
3 cr.
Electromechanical energy conversion, torque, and power; AC and DC rotating machines, and transformers. Prerequisites: EET 0110, EET 0111 and 0010 . Corequisite: EET 1051.

EET 1152 POWER SYSTEMS 1
3 cr.
Introduction to the analysis of power generation and distribution systems. Topics include the one-line diagram, per-unit calculations, system modeling, three-phase fault calculations, and system protective devices. Prerequisite: EET 1151 or 1051. Corequisite: EET 1052.

EET 1153 POWER SYSTEMS 2
4 cr.
Power system design and analysis. Topics include load flow, unbalanced faults (using symmetrical components), economic dispatch, and systems stability. Extensive use of digital computer in these analyses. . PREQ: EET 1152 or 1052.

EET 1161 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
3 cr.

Fundamental concepts and tools of combinational and sequential logic design. Areas of study include truth tables, Karnaugh maps, and other methods of formulating and minimizing Boolean switching functions; introduction to the characteristics of commercially available logic using medium-scale integrator (MSI) and large-scale integrator (LSI) devices; study of sequential logic circuits including state tables, state diagrams, and timing diagrams; design of sequential circuits using flip-flops, counters and registers; hardware description languages; and introduction to programmable logic devices. Prerequisite: ET 0031 EET 0121 0121 or 0021 . Corequisite: EET 1061.


EET 1165 CONTROL METHODS
3 cr.

Fundamentals of feedback control systems and devices as applied to electrical machinery and process controls. Areas of study include analysis of systems using frequency and domain techniques (Bode diagrams), study of transducers, and analog and digital techniques used in motor-driven speed and position controls. Prerequisites: EET 0111, EET 0121 or 0021 and 1151 or 1051; Corequisite: EET 1065.


EET 1171 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 1
3 cr.

Introduction to the theoretical and applied fundamentals of audio, video, and data electronic communication techniques. Topics include propagation, antennae, transmission lines, transmitters and receivers, modems, and other devices using various forms of modulation such as continuous wave (CW), amplitude modulator (AM), frequency modulator (FM), single-side band (SSB), etc. Prerequisite: EET 1122 or 1022. Corequisite: EET 1071.


EET 1172 ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS
3 cr.

The first quarter of the course introduces the student to the mathematical background for dealing with Maxwell's equations. The second quarter introduces the student to uniform plane waves, reflection and transmission, wave guides and resonators, and transmission lines. The final two quarters deal with electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, respectively. Electric and magnetic forces, energy, and quasistatic fields in electric and magnetic materials media will conclude the course. Computer simulations in the laboratory will supplement the lecture topics. Prerequisite: EET 1171 or 1071 . Corequisite: EET 1072.


EET 1175 ADVANCED DIGITAL SYSTEMS
3 cr.
This course examines several different approaches to digital system design and implementation. Concepts and practices in digital system implementation including software and hardware system, CPLD, FPGA, and ASIC flow. Topics include HDL based design flow: schematics, simulation, verification, and testing. Concepts of systems testing are introduced including the JTAG standard. PREQ: EET 1132 or 1032 and 1161 or 1061; CREQ: EET 1075.

EET 1176 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
4 cr.

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to discrete time signals and the systems that are used to process them. Topics studied include sampling and aliasing, recursive and nonrecursive digital filters (analysis and design), the Z-transform, and both the discrete and fast Fourier transform. The rapid and continuing decrease in the cost of computing facilities enhances the value of the study of digital techniques of signal processing. Prerequisite: EET 0111.


EET 1177 INSTRUMENTATION AND INDUSTRIAL CONTROL
4 cr.

Introduces labview as a graphical programming language used to implement automated instrumentation and control systems. Introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) as a modern implementation of sequential control techniques. Students will create labview and PLC programs to solve a variety of engineering problems. PREQ: ET 0030 or 0031 and EET 0010 or 0110.


EET 1183 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1184 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1185 JUNIOR SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1186 JUNIOR SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1187 SENIOR SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1188 SENIOR SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the electrical engineering profession.

EET 1195 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL
2 cr.
A written proposal will be submitted. After approval of the proposal by the faculty, a faculty advisor is assigned and the senior project will begin. Open to seniors only.

EET 1197 SPECIAL PROJECT - DIRECTED STUDY
1–6 cr.
Directed study designed to give the student an opportunity to study a particular aspect of the discipline in some depth.

EET 1198 SPECIAL PROJECT - INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Independent study designed to give the student an opportunity to study a particular aspect of the discipline in some depth.

EET 1199 SENIOR PROJECT
2 cr.
Employs previously learned material in electrical engineering technology. The project involves design and analysis of a new or modified electrical circuit or system with verifiable feasibility. Projects may be on an individual or group basis, either interdepartmental or intradepartmental in organization. Open to seniors only. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 1192 or EET 1195.

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (ELED)

 

ELED 0010 DIRECTED TUTORING PRACTICUM
1–3 cr.
Provides elementary education and pre-education majors with tutoring experiences in area school districts or other field settings. Admission to the course by permission of the instructor only.

ELED 0011 DIRECTED FIELD PRACTICUM
1–3 cr.
Provides individual elementary education and pre-education majors the opportunity to actively assist a faculty member on teaching or curriculum projects. Admission to this course by permission of the instructor only.

ELED 0012 DIRECTED STUDY IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
1–3 cr.
Provides individual elementary education and pre-education majors the opportunity to explore in-depth specific topics in education. Admission to this course by permission of the instructor only.

ELED 1110 EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN
3 cr.

Provides a beginning experience in which students explore strategies, techniques, and programs that enhance the development of young children by creating appropriate environments and experiences. Includes a field practicum in an early childhood setting. Prerequisite: PSY 0230.


ELED 1111 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION FIELD PRACTICUM I
1 cr.
Course will be taken during the first term of the upper level program—the first of three such courses prior to student teaching. Students will be assigned to an elementary or middle school cooperating teacher, K-6, for a minimum of one full day per week for seven/eight weeks for observation and participation. Students will be asked to focus on the teacher's instructional strategies related to individual children, including those with particular problems or challenges.

ELED 1112 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION FIELD PRACTICUM II
1 cr.
Course will be taken during the second term of the upper-level program—the second of three sequential courses prior to student teaching. Students will be assigned to an elementary or middle school cooperating teacher, K-6, for a minimum of one full day per week for seven/eight weeks for observation and participation. Students will be asked to focus on the teacher's management of groups, cooperative learning strategies, and methods of maintaining and effective learning environment.

ELED 1113 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION FIELD PRACTICUM III
1 cr.

Course will be taken during the third term of the upper-level program—the third of three sequential courses prior to student teaching. Students will be assigned to an elementary or middle school cooperating teacher, K-6, for a minimum of one full day per week for seven/eight weeks for observation and participation. Students will be asked to focus on the teacher's management of groups, cooperative learning strategies, and methods of maintaining an effective learning environment.


ELED 1141 INSTRUCTION IN READING, WRITING, & LITERATURE I
3 cr.

This course has two distinct components. Two-thirds of the course introduces students to the basic concepts of literacy development, including oral and written language development, reading and writing pedagogical approaches, phonics, grammar, spelling, and handwriting. One-third of the course introduces students to literature for young children. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.


ELED 1142 INSTRUCTION IN READING, WRITING, & LITERATURE II
4 cr.
This course has two distinct components. The first part of the course deals with instructional and assessment strategies for young children in stages of emergent literacy. The second part of the course introduces elementary education majors to literature for more fluent readers. Strategies for introducing fluent readers to a variety of literary genres will be emphasized. Prerequisites: ELED 1141, admission to the upper-level program.

ELED 1143 INSTRUCTION IN READING, WRITING, & LITERATURE III
3 cr.
This course deals with developing the literacy strategies of more fluent readers. Instruction for teaching reading and writing to older elementary school children is emphasized. A variety of assessment procedures are introduced. Elementary education majors will learn to diagnose the needs of fluent readers and to develop literacy programs based on the specific needs of the intermediate-age child. A literature-based literacy curriculum will be stressed. Prerequisites: ELED 1142, admission to the upper-level program.

ELED 1162 ART EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM
2 cr.
A course designed for the elementary education student to learn to effectively teach the basic concepts of art, art appreciation, and criticism; the production of art in the elementary classroom; and the use of art for therapy and recreation. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level elementary education program.

ELED 1171 TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
3 cr.

This course is designed to prepare the elementary education student to effectively teach science at the elementary school level. Students will examine and implement various instructional strategies used to teach elementary school science. Specific emphasis will be placed upon developing competency in lesson planning, instructional presentations, creating instructional materials, investigating the science/ technology connection, and analyzing assessment techniques and strategies. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level program, NATSC 0080.


ELED 1172 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
3 cr.
Designed to provide the theoretical background, the pedagogical and psychological concepts, and the field-based experience necessary for planning, implementing, and assessing a contemporary elementary school mathematics pro gram.. Students will be introduced to a variety of instructional approaches and materials with particular emphasis on teaching mathematical concepts and procedures through problem solving and active learning. One component of the course entails observation and participation in mathematics classes within an elementary school setting. Prerequisites: Admission to upper-level program, MATH 0071, MATH 0080.

ELED 1173 TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
3 cr.

Designed to provide the theoretical background, the pedagogical concepts, and the field-based experience necessary for planning, implementing, and assessing a social studies program in the elementary school. Students will be introduced to a variety of approaches for facilitating the learning of content and skills drawn from the social sciences and for integrating this learning with other areas of the curriculum. One component of the course entails observation and participation in social studies classes within an elementary school setting. Prerequisites: Admission to the upper-level program, GEOG 0810, HIST 0610, HIST 0620.


ELED 1174 PRIMARY STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
7 cr.

Full-time experience for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at an elementary school, grades kindergarten–3. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from University supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are within 15–20 miles of the college; students are placed in established sites only. Open only to elementary education students approved for student teaching.


ELED 1182 PHYSICAL EDUCATION & RHYTHMIC EXPERIENCES
2 cr.

Designated for the elementary education major, this course examines basic goals and instructional strategies of physical education in the elementary school. Course content includes application and analysis of physical fitness and wellness principles, rhythmic activity, fundamental motor activities, playground supervision and safety, adaptations for special needs students, and assessment strategies. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level program.


ELED 1184 INTERMEDIATE STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
7 cr.

Full-time experience for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at an elementary or middle school, grades 4 through 6. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from University supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are within 15 miles of the college; students are placed in established sites only. This course is speaking enhanced. Open only to elementary education students approved for student teaching.

 
ELED 1186 ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING ABROAD-NEW ZEALAND
7cr.
Seven-weeks in duration, this full-time experience is designed for teacher certification candidates in a student teaching center at an elementary school in New Zealand. Provides opportunities to observe, plan, conduct, and assess instruction in the school setting with professional feedback from university supervisors and experienced master teachers. School sites are selected in exemplary Auckland area schools; students are placed in established sites only. Open only to elementary education students approved for student teaching.
 
ELED 1187 ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING FOR EXPERIENCED TEACHERS
1–14 cr.

For experienced teachers who need student teaching to satisfy certification guidelines. Specific requirements such as length of term, number of credits, etc., will be determined on a case-by-case basis. Prerequisite: At least one year of successful student teaching experience and admission to the upper-level elementary education program.


ELED 1193 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
3 cr.
A course directed at addressing the elements of professional development of the teacher. Coverage includes classroom management, school law, teaching styles, certification, tenure, school environment, curriculum, professional associations, and the teaching-learning environment. The course will make use of case studies and other approaches to information on the role of being a classroom teacher. The course is designed to provide the finishing preparation for student teaching and the necessary knowledge and skills to begin a successful teaching career. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-level elementary education program.

ELED 1194 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION TEACHING SEMINAR
2 cr.
Designed to provide the student teacher with the basic elements of professional development and career opportunities. Emphasis is on professionalism, interviewing, résumés, portfolios, professional meetings, and other appropriate topics. To be taken by elementary education students during the student teaching term.
 
ELED 1211 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 1                  
3 cr.
This is one of two consecutive early childhood education courses.  Foundations of early childhood education will be addressed.  Curriculum models and approaches regarding best practices in early childhood education will be explored.  Facilities management, budget development, and administration of early childhood programs also will be introduced.   In addition, professionalism in the field of early childhood education will be stressed.
 
ELED 1213 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2                       
3 cr.
This is the second of two consecutive early childhood education courses. This course provides the pre-service teacher with the opportunity to learn and put into practice the content and competencies needed to effectively facilitate and foster the learning of young children.  Students will learn how to plan and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional practices; how to make adaptations for learners with diverse needs; how to utilize appropriate assessment strategies; and how to collaborate professionally with colleagues, families, and community agencies.  Curriculum that spans the aesthetic, affective, cognitive, language, physical, and social domains of development will be stressed

   

                     

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (ET)

 

ET 0011 ENGINEERING DRAWING
3 cr.

Covers the basics of engineering drawing utilizing freehand sketching, mechanical drawing, and Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD), and solid modeling. The fundamental principles of orthographic projection, as well as the topics of dimensioning, sectional views, auxiliary views, descriptive geometry and assembly drawings are covered.


ET 0022 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS
2 cr.
Introduction to engineering analysis and design includes utilization of the fundamentals of mathematics and science in the solution of engineering problems. Design fundamentals including functional decomposition are combined with Newton's laws of motion, statics, dynamics, friction, electrical circuits, and magnetism to solve real problems. Students are required to design and build solutions, predict outcomes, and report on the success of the design.

ET 0023 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-AIDED ENGINEERING
2 cr.
Introduce students to a variety of computational methods and software tools for engineering problem solving and documentation.

ET 0030 COMPUTER SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING AND APPLICATIONS
2 cr.

Introduces the student to the basic structure of a digital computer and a higher level programming language. Use of a programming language as a problem-solving tool is emphasized. The student is exposed to a variety of computer applications within the engineering field. Typical application areas include numerical methods, modeling, simulation, computer graphics, linear programming, statistical analysis, and engineering economics. Prerequisites:ET 0023 and MATH 0221 or 0220.


ET 0031 COMPUTER SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING APPLICATION IN C
2 cr.

Introduces the student to the basic structure of a digital computer and a higher level programming language. Use of the C language as a problem-solving tool is emphasized. The student is exposed to a variety of computer applications within the engineering field. Typical application areas include numerical methods, modeling, simulation, computer graphics, linear programming, statistical analysis, and engineering economics. Prerequisites: MATH 0221 or 0220. and ET 0023.


ET 0035 ENGINEERING DESIGN
3 cr.

Introduction to the basic procedures involved in good engineering design. Design methodology, analysis and synthesis techniques are studied. Fundamental engineering concepts and laws studied in prior courses, such as statics, and electrical circuits along with concurrent courses like dynamics and strength of materials are used in completing required design projects. Prerequisites: ET 0023, EET 0010, and EET 0110. Corequisites: ET 0052, ET 0053 and EET 0111 and (0053 or EET 0111). .


ET 0051 MECHANICS—STATICS
3 cr.

The principal objective of this course is to develop the ability to analyze any problem in a logical manner and to document that analysis in a clear and orderly fashion. Concepts to be studied include equilibrium of two- and three-dimensional force systems acting on rigid bodies as well as particles, plane trusses and frames, centroids and centers of gravity, elementary principles of dry friction, and moments of inertia of both areas and masses. The use of free-body diagrams will be stressed. PREQ: MATH 0221 or 0220 and PHYS 0150 or 0174; CREQ: MATH 0231 or 0230.


ET 0052 MECHANICS—DYNAMICS
3 cr.

This second course in mechanics adds the concept of motion to the principles developed in the first course. Kinematics of rigid bodies as well as particles, including relative motion as well as both simple rectilinear and curvilinear motion, are studied. In addition, kinetic analysis using Newton's second law, work-energy methods, and impulse-momentum techniques will be applied to those same systems. The free-body diagram rational analysis of rigid bodies will be emphasized. Prerequisites: MATH 0231 or 0230 and PHYS 0150 or 0174..


ET 0053 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
3 cr.

The study of stress and strain relationships of bodies subjected to loads. Topics studied are axially loaded members; beam analysis including shear and moment diagrams, flexural and shearing stresses, and beam deflections; torsion; principal stresses including Mohr's circle; combined stresses; temperature effects; and statically indeterminate members. PREQ: ET 0051 and (MATH 0231 or 0230); CREQ: ET 0054.


ET 0054 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LAB
1 cr.

Physical tests are conducted and lab reports written on many of the basics learned in the lecture course.  Prerequisite: ET 0023. Corequisite: ET 0053.


ET 0081 FRESHMAN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR
0 cr.

Presents a detailed description of both the engineering technology program and the engineering profession. Professional engineers currently in practice with industrial, governmental, and/or consulting organizations are invited as guest lecturers.


ET 0082 FRESHMAN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR
0 cr.
Presents a detailed description of both the engineering technology program and the engineering profession. Professional engineers currently in practice with industrial, governmental, and/or consulting organizations are invited as guest lecturers.

ET 1103 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS
3 cr.

This course involves the integration of engineering and business decision making. It emphasizes analytical investment decision methodologies as they relate to engineering management decisions. It focuses on basic capital project evaluation techniques to include:  interest calculations, present and annual worth comparisons, rate of returns, depreciation, income taxes, benefit/cost ratio analysis, replacement analysis, bonds, break-even analysis and cash flows before and after taxes. Sophomore level or higher


ET 1115 ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

A course designed for the individual who wants to learn and develop their leadership and team building skills. Topics include influence, integrity, attitude, vision, change, priorities, self discipline, personal and interpersonal effectiveness, development of teams and principles of leadership. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level students only.


ENGLISH COMPOSITION (ENGCMP)

 

ENGCMP 0001 FRESHMAN COMPOSITION 1 TUTORIAL
3 cr.

Students meet weekly with their Composition 1 instructor to work on understanding and addressing writing assignments and how to strengthen their writing at the sentence and paragraph levels.  Students use the papers they produce in ENGCMP 0005 as materials for discussion and revision.

 

ENGCMP 0002 FRESHMAN WRITING SEMINAR
3 cr.

This course provides incoming freshmen with the opportunity to enhance their writing skills while studying a topic reflecting the particular interest of the instructor. Students engage in challenging reading and substantial writing assignments.


ENGCMP 0003 COMMUNICATION 1
3 cr.

This course is designed for students in engineering technology, but it may be elected by any student who wants to enhance skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.


ENGCMP 0004 COMMUNICATION 2
3 cr.
A continuation of Communications 1 with additional emphasis on research writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002, ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

ENGCMP 0005 COMPOSITION 1
3 cr.
In this course, students study and practice the essentials of essay writing, with an emphasis on producing clear, correct prose.

ENGCMP 0006 COMPOSITION 2
3 cr.

In this course, a companion course to Freshman Writing Seminar and Composition 1, students study and practice essay writing in more depth. The course also includes an introduction to researching and writing from sources. Required of all freshmen. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0002 or ENGCMP 0003 or ENGCMP 0005.

ENGLISH LITERATURE (ENGLIT)

 

ENGLIT 0055 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE
3 cr.

This course is especially designed for prospective English majors to acquaint them with the major works in English literature from its beginning through the 18th century.
Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 0056 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 2
3 cr.

Traces the development of English literature from the beginning of the romantic period to the present. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 0080 NARRATIVE LITERATURE
3 cr.
Traces the course of narrative literature from the epic through the novel, with an emphasis on the search for form.

ENGLIT 0085 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES
3 cr.
An interdisciplinary investigation of the basic aspects of the Division of Humanities, with emphasis on perceptual abilities inherent in careful reading of literature, viewing of art, and listening to music. An open exploration of how these aspects interrelate.

ENGLIT 0088 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE
3 cr.
This course studies invention and interpretation and explores the literary devices writers use to produce texts and readers use to interpret them. Although texts may change from section to section and instructor to instructor, they always stimulate investigation into reading and writing as ways of knowing.

ENGLIT 0311 THE DRAMATIC IMAGINATION
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the major dramatic forms and compares the ways playwrights from several centuries use ideas, characters, and theatrical contexts. Students will consider how social, historical, and dramatic contexts influence interpretations and evaluation—or may lead to alternative understandings of a play.

ENGLIT 0316 READING POETRY
3 cr.
By studying various kinds of poetry from a number of sources, this course introduces students to particular forms of poetry and kinds of poetic language. Because poetry invites very close reading, students will explore various techniques for making sense of poems.

ENGLIT 0326 SHORT STORY IN CONTEXT
3 cr.

This course studies short stories that explore a variety of themes. It seeks to define the short story as a specific literary genre and to distinguish it from earlier forms of short narrative literature. It then examines the effects of literary, cultural, and historical traditions on these stories and their reception.


ENGLIT 0345 LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
3 cr.

In this course, students will read and write about the environment and its issues as expressed through literature. Readings in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction will explore how the geography of a location influences the character of its inhabitants and how the forces of nature affect their lives and fortunes. Writing will consist of personal and critical short essays as well as a longer essay/project involving independent readings and research.


ENGLIT 0351 GENDER STUDIES
3 cr.

This course is designed to offer interested students an opportunity to broaden their awareness and understanding of gender in contemporary American and global cultures in relation to the historical trajectories that shape and provoke current issues and events.  The course provides a solid grounding in the critical understanding of both the representations of gender in texts of various media and the relationship of such representations to the culture that produces and receives them.  A series of text selections, including primary and secondary essays of theory and criticism that explore particular ways of looking and primary texts of literature that contain representations to be analyzed, will be examined in their historical, intellectual, and literary contexts, considering a variety of critical approaches.

 

ENGLIT 0355 DIGITAL HUMANITIES
3cr.
The course will introduce students to the emerging field of digital humanities by exploring the contemporary theories of social media, by designing a website, studying digital texts and objects, examining fictional personae within virtual environments, and investigating virtual worlds as spaces of creation, inquiry, political upheaval and social change.

 

ENGLIT 0361 WOMEN AND LITERATURE
3 cr.
An exploration of writings by and about women. Through reading various literary forms—poetry, fiction, autobiography—students will explore the aspirations and realities of women's lives. Students will consider how social issues—class, race, etc.—affect women writers.

ENGLIT 0365 LITERATURE AND THE CONTEMPORARY
3 cr.
This course examines contemporary cultural expression across a range of forms and media. It investigates the contemporary as both a complex reworking of past narratives and traditions and as the production of the experimental and the new.

ENGLIT 0530 FILM ANALYSIS
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the art of cinema and to the techniques for its formal and iconographic analysis. It examines the nature of shot composition and visual framing, the use of color, the role of lighting as a pictorial element, the potentials of camera movement, the modes of editing and the nature of image/sound montage. It also introduces students to dominant cinema forms—narrative, experimental, documentary, etc.—and connects the cinema to visual arts (like painting and sculpture).

ENGLIT 0574 AMERICAN LITERARY TRADITIONS I
3 cr.
An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to trace characteristic features and consistent concerns that shaped the development of a distinctly American literature. Begins with the religious/economic argument of the first-generation European migration, moves through the literature of the politically charged Colonial era, and closes in the mid-19th century and the initial expressions of a national literature.

ENGLIT 0575 AMERICAN LITERARY TRADITIONS II
3 cr.
An introductory course that draws on fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to explore the characteristic features and shared concerns that shaped the emergence of American literature into international prominence. Begins with the emergence of realism in post-Civil War industrial America, moves through the literature of two world wars and the economic and social revolutions of the 20th century, and closes with the defining concerns of the contemporary era.

ENGLIT 0576 MAJOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITERS
3 cr.

This course offers a broad introductory survey of African American literature.  It investigates thematic, formal, historical, or cultural topics in African American literature, examining writers from major periods such as the Harlem renaissance and the contemporary era.  The course considers the relationship of social history and literature; the insights these writers furnish us about black consciousness, the black self, black perception, and the black vision; and the distinctive qualities of black literary and cultural traditions.  Available for general education credits.


ENGLIT 0581 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
3 cr.
This course will focus on a number of Shakespeare's major plays from all phases of his career. Class discussion will consider the historical context of the plays, their characterization, theatrical technique, imagery, language, and themes. Every attempt will be made to see the plays both as poems and as dramatic events.

ENGLIT 0598 BIBLE AS LITERATURE
3 cr.
This introductory course acquaints students with what is in the Bible and provides background information drawn from various disciplines about the elements and issues that give it its distinctive character. Attention is necessarily given to its religious perspectives, as they govern the nature and point of view of the biblical narratives, but no specific religious view is urged.

ENGLIT 0615 LITERATURE AND RACE
3 cr.
This course focuses on writers from three major periods in Black literature; Pre-Civil War (the Slave Narratives), Harlem Renaissance (when writers such as Langston Hughes were changing the nature of Black writing), and the Contemporary period. We will consider the relationship of social history and literature; the insights these writers furnish us about Black Consciousness, the Black Self, Black Perception and the Black vision; and the distinctive qualities of Black literary and cultural traditions.

ENGLIT 0616 LITERATURE AND MIGRATION
3 cr.
This course reads various reflections on the immigrant's experience of separation or exile, the problems of encountering a new society, and the processes of acculturation.

ENGLIT 0625 DETECTIVE FICTION
3 cr.
This course examines detective fiction in terms of its history, its social meaning and as a form of philosophizing. It also seeks to reveal the place and values of popular fiction in our lives.

ENGLIT 0626 SCIENCE FICTION
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the major ideas, themes, and writers in the development of science fiction as a genre. Discussions will help students understand and use critical methods for the analysis of science fiction. The topics covered include problems describing and defining the genre, contrasting ideologies in Soviet and American science fiction, the roles of women as characters, readers, and writers of science fiction.

ENGLIT 1021 HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM
3 cr.

This course concentrates on the major developments in the history of literary thought and criticism from Plato to modern and postmodern developments. The major documents of literary criticism are studied in relation to the contexts—historical, cultural, and philosophical—that gave rise to these responses. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1032 THE LITERATURE OF THE ABSURD
3 cr.
A study of the stylistic innovations and philosophic assumptions of the literature of the absurd. Camus, Sartre, Ionesco, Beckett, Barth, and Vonnegut are among the main writers discussed. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1106 MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE
3 cr.
The major works of English literature of the 14th and 15th centuries, exclusive of Chaucer, will be read in the original Middle English. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1111 THE RENAISSANCE IN ENGLAND
3 cr.
A study of the historical background as well as the important social, political, and literary developments in 16th-century England. Authors range from More to Spenser to Marlowe. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1116 CHAUCER
3 cr.

This course closely examines major works by Chaucer—The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. Students will view Chaucer's work in its historical, social, artistic, and intellectual contexts. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1120 RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE
3 cr.
Deals with the main literary developments of the period, excluding the novel. Emphasis is on the major figures from Dryden to Goldsmith.

ENGLIT 1129 ADVANCED SHAKESPEARE
3 cr.

This course assumes a basic understanding of Shakespeare’s dramatic genres and poetic techniques.  Students will read and research roughly seven plays, applying to the plays critical theory, performance theory and practice, and textual analysis.


ENGLIT 1130 17TH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE
3 cr.
A study of important ideas and forms in 17th-century England from Donne through Milton. Emphasis is on Milton's major works. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1155 18TH-CENTURY NOVEL
3 cr.
Explores the literary and historical conditions that gave rise to the development of the novel in 18th-century England. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1171 THE ROMANTIC PERIOD
3 cr.
Studies the work of those major writers—from Blake through Keats—that constitutes British romanticism. It explores the social, intellectual, and aesthetic concerns of this movement and its relationships with its British and European cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1182 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
3 cr.
Studies the poetry of Tennyson, the Brownings, Clough, Arnold, the Rosettis, Meredith, Morris, Swinburne, Hopkins, and Hardy. Attention will also be given to a sampling of prose of the period. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.
   
ENGLIT 1200 AMERICAN LIT TO 1860
3 cr.

This course surveys literature produced in America before the Civil War. In the process it explores the historical, political, social, and cultural factors that affected the development of that literature. It examines the work of writers who saw themselves as powerful framers of the national experience yet fearful they would have little effects on a culture confronting problems of slavery, divisiveness, literacy, economic change, immigration, etc.

 
3 cr.
ENGLIT 1210 AMERICAN RENAISSANCE  
This course surveys the flowering of American literature during the first half of the nineteenth century. It analyzes the struggle of American writers to develop a new national literature.

ENGLIT 1239 SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 cr.

Treats topics relevant to American literature. Topics vary, but will include the literature of a specific era or region; the achievement of a specific writer or school of writers; ethnic and/or gender studies; film and literature studies; specific thematic topics; genre studies; and/or close readings of influential texts. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1242 20TH-CENTURY POETRY
3 cr.
The works of such poets as Pound, Frost, Eliot, Williams, Auden, and Dylan Thomas, together with more contemporary poets, such as Rich, Levertor, Snyder, Forche, Lowell, and Snodgrass, are considered. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1246 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 cr.
Explores the emergence and consolidation of African American literary traditions. Uses fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Focuses on the aesthetic and political considerations of defining such a tradition. Traces the historic development from the Colonial age and the rise of slavery through Reconstruction and the Jim Crow era, closing with contemporary concerns of the post-civil rights movement. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1248 LITERATURE OF MINORITY WOMEN
3 cr.

Through a close study of literary works by minority women writers of North America, particularly African/Asian American writers, the course intends to help students develop a clear understanding and a critical appreciation of these different "strands" in North American culture.


ENGLIT 1252 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 cr.
Examines significant American writings published from 1900 to World War II, specifically American literature's response to two world wars, the introduction of narrative experimentation, economic booms and busts, the scientific revolution, political radicalism, the women's movement, the emergence of ethnic literatures, and the beginning of the nuclear age. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1253 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
3 cr.
A study of works by poets who have been active since World War II to the present. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1260 AMERICAN POETRY
3 cr.
Examines select poets and signature texts that represent the defining elements of American poetry from the Puritan era to the present. Emphasizes shared themes and concerns as well as those formal experiments that have come to distinguish American poetry. By permission of instructor only. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 12880 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS
3 cr.

This course examines writings by American women from the 1950’s to the present. It draws upon feminist literary criticism to explore issues such as the symbolic significance of gender, power relations between the sexes, and difference in representation across race, class, and ethnicity.


ENGLIT 1294 FORM AND THEORY
3 cr.
This advanced seminar explores the interconnections between the disciplines of literature and creative writing. Students will study the history, criticism, and craft of modern and/or contemporary literary works. Through critical and creative writing assignments, students will engage these texts as both writers and readers.

ENGLIT 1301 19TH-CENTURY NOVEL
3 cr.
Deals with the rise of the English novel of the 19th century. The authors include Austen, Scott, Dickens, Thackeray, Trollope, the Brontes, George Eliot, Hardy, and Butler. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1312 THE 19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL
3 cr.
Tracks the emergence of a defining American novel from the early years of the Republic through the political and social upheavals of the Civil War and through the issues specific to a new industrial and economic power at the close of the century. Includes texts that represent the romance, psychological realism, experimental impressionism, naturalism, and urban and regional realism. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1320 THE 20TH-CENTURY NOVEL
3 cr.
A study of the various transformations of the traditional novel in contemporary British and American fiction. Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Hemingway, and Faulkner are among the writers to be studied. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1326 THE MODERNIST TRADITION
3 cr.
This course examines major works in the modernist tradition—poetry, fiction, drama—to determine the role these texts have played in creating the world that seems so familiar now. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1360 TOPICS IN 20TH-CENTURY LITERATURE
3 cr.
Considers thematic, formal historical or cultural topics in late 19th- and 20th-century literature. It ties these issues to critical and social concerns in international modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1365 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE
3 cr.

Explores works that represent the defining literary movements of American literature from 1950 to the present, including post-Hiroshima realism, postmodernism, posthumanism, cyber-realism, and post-postmodernism. Offers historical perspective on post-war American intellectual culture by examining the era's defining theoretical/literary models. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1371 MAKERS OF MODERN DRAMA
3 cr.
Concentrates intensively and comparatively on plays written by late-19th and early-20th century continental, English, Irish, and American dramatists. Plays selected will reflect major dramatic movements of the period (realism, naturalism, symbolism, expressionism) and will be analyzed not only by theatrical characteristics but also in relation to their dramatic, critical, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1381 WORLD LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
3 cr.
This course examines contemporary literature, primarily in English, written in Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, etc. It pays particular attention to its depiction of social, political, and moral concerns. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1420 MAJOR AMERICAN DRAMATISTS
3 cr.
This course considers the full range of American drama, but emphasizes the development and achievement of American theater in the last 100 years. It focuses on the major movements, the formal experimentations, the defining voices, and the distinguishing themes of American theater. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1500 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
To be arranged in consultation with instructor. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1553 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
3 cr.
A survey of the linguistic development of English from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Attention given to basic linguistic structures and discursive practices and to the social and historical conditions under which they change. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1588 UTOPIAN LITERATURE
3 cr.

This course studies utopian fiction with an emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century works. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1605 COMEDY
3 cr.
This course studies comedy, both its deep structural patterns and its surface humor. Students will read works from many periods (from the Greeks through the 20th century) and genres to understand the literary and cultural meanings of comedy. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1606 TRAGEDY
3 cr.

This course will explore the properties of tragic literature from ancient Greece and Rome through the Renaissance and into the 20th century. In the process, students will address issues often raised about tragic heroes and their flaws, about fate and justice, about catharsis, and about the pathetic. Through the reading of the literature and the criticism, students will seek understanding of tragedy as a literary form and of its changes through time and from culture to culture. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1630 AMERICAN DREAM
3 cr.
An interdisciplinary examination of the American dream of success and the myth of the self-made individual. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1647 LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS
3 cr.

This course will read classics as well as modern works written specifically for an adolescent audience. We will also read and discuss sociological and psychological constructions of adolescents and books on pedagogy. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 and ENGCMP 0006.


ENGLIT 1704 WOMEN NOVELISTS
3 cr.

This course explores the important role women have played in the development of the novel and how they have used and transformed its generic traditions. We will place novels in the contexts of issues important to their own time and discuss questions raised by recent feminist criticism.


ENGLIT 1705 WOMEN AND DRAMA
3 cr.

This course will focus on the work of playwrights who came of age during the feminist movement in the 1970’s and won critical and/or popular acclaim. Students will choose one of the playwrights to research for a class presentation and term paper.


ENGLIT 1830 FILM AS LITERATURE
3 cr.
An in-depth study of film as literature, primarily dealing with objectively observing and evaluating the film experience. In alternating offerings the course may deal with directorial studies, milieu, genres, and literature-into-film studies. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLIT 1912 SENIOR SEMINAR
3 cr.
Intensive study of a single topic or figure that assumes previous work in related literary historical and critical areas. Each seminar moves toward a final paper that integrates earlier literary study with the specific critical perspective developed in this course. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGLISH WRITING (ENGWRT)

 

 

ENGWRT 0050 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
3 cr.
This course offers students an introductory study of the written arts. Through the close reading of modern and contemporary texts and guided experimentation in a variety of genres (e.g., poetry, fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction), students will examine, explore, and discuss the creative process. Class may be taken by freshman English writing majors. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or 0006.

ENGWRT 0053 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL WRITING
3 cr.

This course introduces students to several forms of professional writing, such as review and profile writing, public relations and marketing writing, and writing for the Web.  Students will compose, revise, and edit their own texts and also read and study "real world" examples of professional writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 0500 CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the art and practice of creative nonfiction prose, including personal essay, memoir, and literary journalism.  Students will explore the unique possibilities of the genre by reading and studying modern and contemporary authors, and composing and revising a variety of creative writing assignments. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.

ENGWRT 0521 FICTION WRITING
3 cr.

This course introduces students to aspects of prose fiction—plot, point of view, characterization, conflict, etc. Students may write exercises on these aspects of fiction, or write one or more short stories and revise frequently. Students will also read representative stories and explore their use of particular fictional techniques. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 0531 POETRY WRITING
3 cr.

Through writing exercises, close and extensive reading of modern and contemporary poetry, and intense revision of their own poetry, students will be introduced to the forms, elements, and techniques of poetry writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 0541 PLAYWRITING
3 cr.

A beginning course in writing for the stage. Starting with short scenes, students will work toward understanding the craft and art of constructing theater stories to be performed by actors. The final project will be a one-act play. Throughout there will be emphasis on the stage effectiveness of the writing and opportunity for informal performance of student scripts. Cross-listed as THEA 1765. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 1000 ADVANCED CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING
3 cr.

An advanced writing course designed to hone creative nonfiction writing skills through extensive writing, workshop style peer critiques, and in-depth reading. Several of the sub genres of creative nonfiction will be studied and practiced:  memoir, personal essay, nature writing, travel writing, science writing, biographical profile, and historical incident.  Accurate description, scenic representation, and narrative framing will be among the technical devices considered. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or 0053.


ENGWRT 1021 ADVANCED FICTION WRITING
3 cr.

This course assumes students know the basics of fiction. Students work on writing short stories and read a wide range of stories. Students can expect to revise their work regularly. Class sessions will address problems in fiction writing—from plot to characterization, from point-of-view to style. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053.


ENGWRT 1031 ADVANCED POETRY WRITING
3 cr.

This upper-level poetry writing course offers students who have mastered fundamental skills and who are familiar with basic issues of craft and form a workshop environment in which to compose and revise a significant group of poems. The course will include the close reading and study of some important works of modern and contemporary poetry. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053


ENGWRT 1096 AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE IMPULSE
3 cr.
This course explores the relationship between the writers' lives and the material they write, with close attention paid to form, style, and the raw material transformed by the writing process. Readings can include various short stories and creative nonfiction works pertaining to writers' lives, essays written by writers about their texts, and critical studies about the genre. Students will be asked to write their own autobiographical prose, transforming raw material into creative nonfiction. Permission of instructor may replace the prerequisite. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053.
 
ENGWRT 1111 WRITING ECUADOR: LITERARY ETHNOGRAPHY AND TRAVEL WRITING
3 cr.

Upon completion of the course students—through writing assignments, lecture, readings and discussion—will acquire critical insight into one of more of the following disciplines: literary ethnography: oral history and ethnopoetics; travel writing; creative writing. Furthermore, the proposed course has an international focus, including a significant in-country, experiential learning component:  Students will acquire first-hand insights into some of the social environmental, and health issues- as well as the artistic and cultural achievements—particular to indigenous people living in the rural, developing world.           

 


ENGWRT 1130 GRAMMAR REVIEW
3 cr.

Reviews essential grammatical principles traditionally and historically, including punctuation. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 1180 TRANSLATION WORKSHOP
3 cr.
This course views translation as a form of creative writing or as a technical skill. Proficiency above the intermediate level in some second language is desirable. Students are provided with literal translations to work on when necessary. Prerequisite: SPAN 0212.

ENGWRT 1192 TECHNICAL WRITING
3 cr.

Prepares students to deal with problems of technological communication in various fields. Includes analysis, development, use, and evaluation of various models employed in the process of technical writing. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0006 or ENGCMP 0004.


ENGWRT 1294 FORM AND THEORY
3 cr.

An advanced writing seminar designed to focus on matters of interest unique to the written arts. Specific topics will change from year to year, but assigned texts, class discussion, and student writing will deal with modern and contemporary issues of form and theory from the writers' point of view. Cross-listed with ENGLIT 1294.  Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


ENGWRT 1700 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN WRITING
3 cr.

This seminar provides a capstone experience for English writing majors and students intensely committed to writing. It is assumed that students come to the seminar having taken a fairly broad range of both English writing and literature courses. Students will complete an original manuscript in a genre of their choice (e.g., poetry, fiction, drama, creative nonfiction). Manuscripts will be evaluated by an approved outside reader as well as the instructor. Class hours will be devoted to workshop critiques and discussing contemporary issues of form and theory related to the written arts. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053


ENGWRT 1751 SEMINAR IN FREELANCE WRITING
3 cr.

This course concentrates on developing skills necessary for the freelance writer as well as provides opportunity for students to work on extended projects, such as articles in a series or part of a book-length manuscript. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053.


ENGWRT 1765 PLAYWRITING I
3 cr.

A beginning course in writing for the stage. Starting with short scenes, students will work towards understanding the craft and art of constructing theatre stories to be per formed by actors.  The final project will be a one-act play. Throughout there will be emphasis on the stage effectiveness of the writing and opportunity for informal performance of student scripts. Cross-listed with THEA 1765. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053.


ENGWRT 1902 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
This option permits students to design their own course with the approval of a department faculty member. Students must submit a proposal to the faculty member. Students must have earned at least 6 credits in department writing courses, and the proposed study must not duplicate the content of regularly offered courses. Prerequisite: ENGWRT 0050 or ENGWRT 0053.

ENGWRT 1950 PROFESSIONAL WRITING INTERNSHIP
3-6 cr.

This course will allow qualified students majoring in English writing to work under an employer's supervision while developing and completing tasks relevant to their eventual professional employment.  In an internship, students could write in any number of forms (memos, letters, reports, Web pages, press releases, etc.) and would devote at least 50 percent of their time to drafting, revising, and finalizing various documents for an employer. In addition, students will write a final report for the coordinator of professional writing in which they describe and assess their internship experience.  Students must have junior or senior standing and a 3.0 grade point average to be eligible.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENVSTD)

 

ENVSTD 0100 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
3 cr.

Survey of environmental concepts and principles. Students evaluate contemporary environmental issues as they relate to quality of life. Environmental topics are used to develop analytical skills. The natural and social (environmental) consequences of population growth, food supply demands, pollution, and resource exploitation are discussed.


ENVSTD 1700 SENIOR SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
3 cr.

The student undertakes a critical examination of the problems and issues associated with a particular dimension of environmental policy or environmental management, culminating in a final paper. Required of all environmental studies majors. May be taken concurrently with SOCSC 1910 Internship.


FINE ARTS (FA)

 

FA 0015 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART 1
3 cr.
This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts) from prehistory to the 14th century. Religious and philosophical beliefs, historical events, geological and astronomical phenomenon, and other areas of human inquiry will be addressed in order to better understand the context in which ancient and medieval art was created.

FA 0016 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART 2
3 cr.
This course is a penetrating survey of the major accomplishments in Western art (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from the Renaissance through the modern era. Contextual issues concerning the creation of art, including religious, political, economic, and social conditions that existed in specific societies at specific moments in time will be addressed through slide lectures.

FA 0031 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ART
3 cr.
Rather than simply chronologically surveying all modern art, this course focuses greater attention on primary and interrelated movements—such as realism, impressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art—that were, arguably, the most influential art styles of the 19th and 20th centuries. The complex relationship between art movements and the societal conditions that affected the creation and meaning of this art will be examined through readings, classroom discussion, and visual analysis.

FA 0040 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the art of architecture from the ancient world through the 20th century. Structural, functional, and aesthetic developments will be chronologically examined with a focus on major monuments.

FA 0050 INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL ART
3 cr.
This course is a thorough examination of the art and architecture created during the European Middle Ages. This period begins with the emergence and legalization of Christianity in the Roman Empire and concludes with the arrival of the bubonic plague. Particular attention will be paid to the evolution of Christian imagery as related to theology and society, as well as the structural, functional, and aesthetic developments that occurred in architecture. Art created by migratory tribes and Islamic peoples will also be examined.

FA 0080 WORLD RELIGIOUS ARCHITECTURE
3 cr.
This course examines a rich variety of the world's major religious buildings and complexes, focusing particular attention on understanding structural, functional, and aesthetic characteristics of individual monuments. Societal conditions and religious beliefs that affected their design and meaning will be examined through readings, discussion, and visual analysis.

FA 0150 ANCIENT ART
3 cr.
This course examines in full or in part the artistic and cultural traditions of the ancient world, including the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, and Rome. Religious, literary, and political documents are analyzed to better understand the form and function of ancient sculpture, painting and architecture.

FA 0304 RENAISSANCE ART
3 cr.

This course examines the art and architecture created in Italy and in Northern Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries. Focus is placed on defining the term "Renaissance," as well as exploring the major artists, patrons and cultural centers of the period. Historical events, pertinent literary and philosophical sources, and religious figures are explored to contextualize the work of great masters such as Gioth, Masaccio, Leonard DaVinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, and Palladio.


FA 0351 BAROQUE ART
3 cr.
The Protestant Reformation brought about not only a strong Catholic Counter-Reformation, but also entirely new economic and social conditions under which art and architecture thrived in 17th- and 18th-century Italy, Spain, Flanders, Holland, France, and England. In this course, students will closely examine how societal conditions affected the creation, type, subject matter, and meaning of this art through readings, classroom discussion, and visual/contextual analysis.

FA 0440 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
3 cr.
An intensive study on arguably the most important architect of the 20th century, this course seeks to examine the personal and professional life of Wright. Key works and periods of his career will be focused on, supplemented with analysis of his own writings, in order to come to an understanding of this man's significance to modern architecture. Of particular interest are the structures and projects Wright undertook in the Pittsburgh region, including the world-famous Kaufmann house, Fallingwater.

FA 0450 20TH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE
3 cr.
This course closely examines the development of architectural styles and building technologies from the late 19th century to present day. This will be accomplished by thoroughly investigating (through assigned readings, classroom discussion, and visual analysis) individual architects and their significant structures, as well as the relationship between the built-environment and societal conditions.

FA 0521 AMERICAN PAINTING 19TH CENTURY
3 cr.
This course examines the major movements, artists, and cultural issues in the development of 19th-century American painting. Chronologically or thematically, this course addresses portraiture, landscape, still-life, genre, and history painting up to the 1913 Armory Show.

FA 0621 ART OF CHINA
3 cr.

Not withstanding the title, the purpose of this course is to introduce students to the rich artistic and cultural traditions of Asia as a whole, but particularly India, China, and Japan. By necessity, this course takes a broad approach, yet singular monuments of great importance will receive intense study, such as the Great Stupa at Sanchi, the Taj Mahal, the Forbidden City, and the great Shinto shrine at Ise. Other major topics include Chinese bronze ritual objects, Hindu architecture, Chinese scroll painting, and Japanese prints.


FA 1170 FINE ART INTERNSHIP
3–12 cr.
To be arranged in consultation with instructor.

FA 1412 REALISM AND IMPRESSIONISM
3 cr.
An intensive study of 19th-century European art beginning with Romanticism and concluding with the Post-Impressionists. Literary and social movements are examined within the context of artistic endeavors by Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Whistler, Tanner, and Renoir.

FA 1902 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–3 cr.

Independent reading and research to be arranged in consultation with instructor.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION (FDSED)

 

FDSED 0001 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION: AMERICAN EMPHASIS
3 cr.

American education is studied from historical, cultural, and philosophical perspectives. Students will develop their philosophy of education, cultivate skills that enable them to analyze educational issues, and enhance their learning through local school classroom observations and reflective laboratory activity. Both background checks must be submitted to the Division of Education prior to enrolling in this course.

 
FDSED 1170 TRENDS AND ISSUES IN EDUCATION
3 cr.
A course in which the students and the instructor determine a collection of various contemporary topics including trends and issues in the field of education. Students are expected to research various topics. The topics are analyzed, encouraging various points of view. The course is designed to expand prospective educator's professional knowledge by providing them sufficient background for understanding how critical issues impact teaching and learning and the profession, in general. Prerequisite: FDSED 0001

 

FDSED 1187 STUDENT TEACHING FOR THE EXPERIENCED TEACHER
3cr.
For experienced teachers who need student teaching to satisfy certification guidelines.  Specific requirements such as length of term, number of credits, student population, etc., will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

 

FRENCH (FR)

 

FR 0111 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 1
4 cr.
Introduces the oral-aural and reading-writing skills in the language, and stresses communication and grammatical structure. Emphasis is placed on using the spoken language.

FR 0112 ELEMENTARY FRENCH 2
4 cr.

A continuation of Elementary French 1, this course expands oral-aural and reading-writing skills in the language and stresses communication and grammatical structure. Emphasis is placed on using the spoken language. Prerequisite: FR 0111.


FR 0211 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 1
3 cr.
This course is a logical continuation of the first-year sequence. Emphasis continues to be placed on communication. Prerequisite: FR 0112.

FR 0212 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 2
3 cr.
This course is a continuation of Intermediate French 1. Prerequisite: FR 0211.

FR 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in French. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0311 BUSINESS FRENCH
3 cr.
This course will be an introduction to business practices in France. The major topics covered in class will include written business, communication, financial institutions, trade, and advertising. The students will be asked to do translations, to write professional correspondence and to read articles related to the world of business, economics, and finance. Cross-cultural differences regarding the work place are also a focus of the course. Prerequisite: FR 0212
   
FR 0320 INTRODUCTION TO CIVILIZATION
3 cr.
This course is designed to lead students to a better understanding of France today. Particular attention is directed to the major aspects of contemporary French life and society. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0321 APPROACHES TO FRENCH LITERATURE
3 cr.
The goal of this course is to illustrate ways of looking at literary texts. Students shall examine plays, short prose works, and poems focusing on textual elements such as narrative technique, characterization, societal factors, and language. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0355 FRENCH CONVERSATION
3 cr.
This course is designed to help students already familiar with the basic grammatical structure of the language improve their facility in oral expression. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0356 WRITTEN FRENCH 1
3 cr.
This course is designed to enable students to improve their understanding and control of essential elements of written French. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0380 MODERN FRENCH NOVEL
3 cr.
The French novel is to a great extent a genre in which psychological analysis has been brought to a high level of sophistication. This shall be studied through close analyses of six to eight works in English translation. This course may also be offered as a writing course. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 0452 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–9 cr.
To be arranged in consultation with instructor. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 1011 POETRY
3 cr.
The study of poetry cannot be divorced from the special requirements of versification. Students shall begin by examining the general aspects of French prosody. Then, the regular work of the class will be devoted to the close reading of poems by a number of poets including Ronsard, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Mallarme, Verlaine, and Apollinaire. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 1013 FRENCH THEATRE
3 cr.
Course considers the distinctive characteristics of French drama from the 17th century to the mid-20th century. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 1017 NOVEL 2
3 cr.
This course traces transformation in the French novel from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century new novel. Students will read novels in French chosen for their literary merit as well as their importance as landmarks in the evolution of the French novel. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 1019 20TH-CENTURY TOPICS
3 cr.
This course, offered infrequently, will treat some aspect of the literature of the 20th century in France. Prerequisite: FR 0212.

FR 1083 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE (ENGLISH)
3 cr.
This course, taught in English and offered infrequently, will treat some aspect of French literature.

GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

 

GEOG 0100 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
3 cr.
Analysis of the location of economic activities and factors that affect locational decisions. Models of location for agriculture, manufacturing, retailing, and transportation systems provide a conceptual basis for examining world patterns.

GEOG 0210 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

3 cr.

Introduction to the study of the geographical characteristics and relationships of all phenomena within the Earth's physical environment. Emphasis placed on air, land, and water distributions and the interactions between people and the physical environment.

GEOG 0310 GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES
3 cr.
A survey course dealing with the broad patterns of physical, cultural, and human geography of the United States.

GEOG 0320 GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA
3 cr.
Presents the cultural, political, demographic, and physical features of Africa emphasizing the location, spatial distribution, and interrelations among these features.
GEOG 0325 GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE

3 cr.
This course is designed to acquaint the student with geographic perspectives on Europe. Throughout the semester, the course will follow a systematic approach, examining the physical, cultural, demographic, political, urban, and economic patterns that make up the geography of contemporary Europe. Students are introduced to the diversity of the physical and human landscapes of Europe; the patterns of language, religion, and ethnicity; and the ways in which Europeans have used their land for economic and cultural purposes. Geography of Europe also examines the background and prospects of a united (and divided) Europe. Europe is experiencing tremendous change with the continued growth of the European Union and the transition to market economies in Eastern Europe. While its physical configuration remains unaltered, a process of disintegration and reintegration has changed the map in response to social, cultural, political and economic pressures. The course provides a useful geographic appreciation for the casual European traveler and valuable insights for the serious student of Europe. Making use of the tools and techniques of geographic inquiry, the course will delve into issues to provide a comprehensive understanding of today's Europe.

GEOG 0420 INTRODUCTION TO CARTOGRAPHY
3 cr.

Examines the interpretation of social, political, economic, demographic, and physical data through the use of maps and charts. Mapping software is used to explore map projections; scale; the selection, organization, and presentation of data; cartographic techniques, and map interpretation. The history of mapmaking and maps as propaganda tools are also discussed. Computers are used for all mapping projects; no manual drafting is involved. Course is required for geography majors and is a prerequisite for GEOG 1420 Advanced Cartography and GEOG 1440 Geographic Information Systems.


GEOG 0610 URBAN DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.
The processes and consequences of urban growth are examined in cases ranging from early Mesopotamia, West Africa, and mesa America to contemporary world urbanization patterns. The U.S. urban experience is examined in depth, with particular attention given to problems of town planning, housing, transportation, and environmental quality.

GEOG 0810 EARTH AND PEOPLE
3 cr.
Introduces the student to the nature and scope of the field of geography and demonstrates the methodology that geographers use to examine people and land relationships. A number of world regions will be analyzed in this class.

GEOG 1130 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY
3 cr.
The principles of political geography are developed by a problem approach. The problems range from those of local boundaries and political patterns on the land to national boundaries and inventories with their attendant affect on national power. The classic studies in political geography are examined with emphasis on those current problems that will concern the student as a citizen in the years ahead.

GEOG 1160 POPULATION GEOGRAPHY
3 cr.
A geographical study of population that examines the distribution of people on Earth; analyzes the changing patterns of fertility and mortality with their resulting natural growth; surveys the different forms of spatial mobility, both international and internal; and considers the problem of the world's population growth.

GEOG 1190 GEODEMOGRAPHY
3 cr.
An introduction to various demographic concepts as applied to selected geographic areas. Prerequisite: GEOG 0810 or permission of instructor.

GEOG 1200 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOGRAPHY
3 cr.
A pragmatic, spatial view of regional and global environmental problems. Of particular interest are those problems that transcend political boundaries. Special emphasis is placed on global environmental change.

GEOG 1210 CLIMATOLOGY
3 cr.
Fundamentals and applications of climatology. Climate classification and climatic change are discussed. Human bioclimatology, agroclimatology, and climate modification are examined.

GEOG 1220 NATURAL HAZARDS
3 cr.
An examination of the threatening forces of nature, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, severe weather, droughts, and floods and how people enhance and respond to hazards.

GEOG 1230 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An examination of alternatives in environmental management. Historical, political, social, and economic aspects of conservation and resource management are studied.

GEOG 1240 WATER RESOURCES
3 cr.
This course covers the role of water in geography and environmental systems, including describing and modeling the hydrologic cycle. Socioeconomic aspects of water demand, usage, quantity, and quality are discussed. Emphasis is placed on surface water.

GEOG 1260 ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
An examination of society's production and consumption of energy, and how it is affected by the distribution of energy resources and other social, political, and economic factors. Special consideration is given to the spatial organization of the energy system and its impact on the landscape, current energy uses, and sustainable energy futures. Prerequisite: Recommended–Geog 0810.

GEOG 1300 RUSSIA AND EURASIAN STATES
3 cr.
Presents a systematic analysis of the area's physical, human, and cultural variables and analyzes the distribution, arrangement, and interrelations of these variables.

GEOG 1410 FIELD RESEARCH
3 cr.
Examines various field techniques for the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data. Both physical and cultural variables are studied. Students are expected to spend time in an out-of-class situation.

GEOG 1420 GIS SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Advanced topics in cartography. Prerequisite: GEOG 0420.

GEOG 1425 REMOTE SENSING
3 cr.
This course provides an introduction to remote sensing. The major goal of remote sensing is to obtain information about the earth's surface from measurements by aircraft or satellite sensors of radiated energy. Remote sensing is considered an important research field in geography and other earth sciences. Throughout the course, students will learn the basic physical principles underlying remote sensing analysis and how to process and interpret images obtained from satellite sensors. The course will introduce the basic principles of image interpretation in relation to optical, thermal, and microwave remote sensing systems. Examples of remote sensing application will be presented along with methods for obtaining quantitative information from remote sensing images. Interpretation of remote sensing images will emphasize the importance of spatial and society-environment relationships.

GEOG 1440 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (QR)
3 cr.
Explores the use of computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and spatially referenced data to solve problems of accessibility, optimal routes, site selection and land-use planning, market area analysis, and spatial modeling for raster and vector GIS. GIS software is used in all lab exercises. Permission of instructor required if prerequisite is not met. Prerequisite: GEOG 0420, MATH 0001..

GEOG 1600 JOHNSTOWN AREA STUDY
3 cr.

This seminar affords participants the opportunity to devise, implement, analyze, and write up an actual research project, drawing on data from the Johnstown area. The substantive topic varies from year to year; whatever the topical focus, considerable attention is paid to the practical aspects of conducting research.


GEOG 1610 URBAN PLANNING
3 cr.
Urban planning aims to promote the social, economic, and environmental well-being of local communities. In this course, students will explore the purpose, practice, and theories of contemporary planning. They will also develop the ability to observe, analyze, and evaluate the built environment, which provides a crucial foundation for good urban policy decision-making. Through reality-based problems, students will understand the interplay between planning analysis, regulation, markets, and the political process. Course themes include the history of planning, land use and zoning, the legal framework of planning, downtown redevelopment, suburban sprawl and New Urbanism, public space, transportation planning, citizen participation in planning, and other topics.

GEOG 1800 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

GEOG 1810 DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

GEOG 1820 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research under the supervision of a faculty member in which the results of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

GEOG 1830 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity, usually off campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

GEOLOGY (GEOL)

 

GEOL 0010 PRINCIPLES OF ASTRONOMY
4 cr.

The course involves a systematic survey of both the solar system and stellar astronomy which includes historical perspectives and modern discoveries. The planets, stars, galaxies and cosmology are discussed in detail homework and class exercises expose the student to practical methods of astronomy and utilize basic math skills of algebra and trigonometry.



GEOL 0015 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY
4 cr.
The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of geology and its processes and an appreciation of how geology relates to the human experience. The required laboratory work includes the study and identification of rocks and minerals; the interpretation of topographic maps, aerial photographs, and geologic maps; and the study of glaciation and ground water. At least one lab session will be a field trip. Fulfills general education requirements in the Division of Natural Sciences.

GEOL 0024 METEOROLOGY (QR)
4 cr.

This course will provide students with an overview of the earth's weather systems. Emphasis will be on lab-centered, hands-on activities designed to demonstrate weather phenomenon through a holistic approach. Topics will include, but are not limited to structure and composition of the atmosphere, global patterns of circulation, pressure systems, fronts, air masses, weather maps and weather prediction, and climate systems. Students will be required to complete weekly assignments, and there will be a semester project. At least one class session will be a field trip. Fulfills general education requirements in the Division of Natural Sciences.


GEOL 0061 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY
4 cr.
Basic principles for reconstructing the geologic past are introduced, and Earth history is surveyed in terms of geological and biological evolution from the origin of the solar system to the present. Laboratory work includes study of rocks as clues to Earth history, identification of fossils, stratigraphic correlation, paleoenvironmental and paleogeographic reconstruction, and interpretation of geologic history from geologic maps. Includes a two-day (weekend) field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 0083 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY
3 cr.
Emphasis on physical aspects of the oceans. Topics include geology of the seafloor, chemical and physical nature of seawater, waves, tides, coastal systems, ocean resources, and environmental concerns.

GEOL 0086 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
3 cr.
This course will provide the student with an awareness of the environmental problems and geologic hazards facing mankind today. The main topics include: volcanism, earthquakes, flooding, slope instability, hydrologic cycle, surface and ground water supply, water law, water pollution, fuel resources, acid mine drainage, and greenhouse effect.

GEOL 0087 EARTH, CLIMATE, AND LIFE THROUGH TIME
3 cr.
A non-laboratory introductory course intended for students other than geology majors. The course examines interactions between the solid earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere in an earth systems context. Topics covered include plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanic hazards, evolution of the atmosphere and oceans, and climate change. The origin of life, evolution and mass extinctions will also be examined in relation to the changing earth system.

GEOL 0090 EARTHQUAKES AND VOLCANOES     
3 cr.

Introductory class that will provide the student with an understanding of how earthquakes and volcanoes occur and impact our planet. Earthquakes and volcanoes can vary from small phenomena with little effect on their surrounding environment to large-scale disasters that impact a wide-geographical region. This course will explore the physical causes, the differences between small and large events, and the results that impact the landscape of our planet.


GEOL 1000 MINERALOGY AND OPTICAL MINERALOGY
4 cr.
The symmetry, structure, and crystal chemistry of minerals are the focus of this course. Laboratory work includes the physical properties of minerals and hand sample identification. The student is introduced to the use of the polarizing microscope as a tool for mineral identification. Permission of instructor required if prerequisite is not fulfilled. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1004 IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY AND PETROGRAPHY
4 cr.
The origin, occurrence, and classification of rocks form the heart of the course. Problems of petrogenesis are approached through the use of phase equilibria and crystal chemistry. Laboratory work includes hand specimen identification and the use of the polarizing microscope. Prerequisite: GEOL 1000.

GEOL 1005 SEDIMENTATION AND STRATIGRAPHY
4 cr.

Course focuses on sedimentological processes and products, depositional environments, and modern stratigraphic principles. Lab emphasizes description and interpretation of various types of sedimentological and stratigraphic data. PREQ: GEOL 0061; NO CREQ.


GEOL 1061 GEOMORPHOLOGY
4 cr.
This course is a survey of the major landform features found on the Earth's surface. Each landform type is first described qualitatively and then examined in terms of the processes, such as stream flow or glacial activity, which cause its development. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with geomorphic principles. Course includes a required three-day field trip. Permission of instructor required if prerequisite is not met. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1105 HYDROLOGY
4 cr.
Detailed discussion of all parts of the hydrologic cycle except for groundwater. Topics include precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, interception, surface water runoff, watershed analysis, flood and low-flow frequency analysis, water quality, and statistical treatment of hydrologic data. A number of labs will be field exercises. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1106 HYDROGEOLOGY
4 cr.
Topics to be covered include soil moisture and groundwater regimes, hydraulic conductivity of Earth materials, principles of groundwater flow, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics and testing, geology of groundwater occurrence, and groundwater contamination. Permission of instructor required if prerequisite is not met. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1108 REPORT WRITING AND COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN GEOLOGY
4 cr.

Conventions of scientific writing are introduced and applied to the preparation of geologic reports. Covers use of various types of software and web-based resources used in geologic research and report writing. Poster and oral presentation are required term projects. Prerequisites: GEOL 0015, and 0061.


GEOL 1110 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY
4 cr.
Mechanical properties of rock deformation, the principles of geologic mapping, and introductory methods of structural analysis are included in this course. Laboratory work includes solving geologic structural problems using orthrographic and stereographic methods, fault motion, and drill hole interpretation. Prerequisites: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1139 GEOLOGY OF SOILS
4 cr.
The genesis, classification, properties, and use of soil are discussed with emphasis on topics of current interest. Relationships of soils to geology, chemistry, and biology are stressed. One year of chemistry is recommended. Permission of instructor is required if prerequisite is not met. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1150 SENIOR PROJECT
4 cr.
The student selects, with the project director's assistance, an area of study, prepares a proposal, performs the research, and prepares both written and oral reports to be presented to the geology and planetary science faculty. Prerequisite: GEOL 1108.

GEOL 1157 GEOLOGIC FIELD METHODS
4 cr.
Course format emphasizes practical work in field situations with supplemental lectures and includes introduction to the use of the Brunton compass, altimeter, allidade, and field mapping techniques. Emphasis is on local geology. Attendance at any accredited field camp is an acceptable substitute. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1160 SELECTED TOPICS
1 cr.
An examination of current geologic trends and problems.

GEOL 1161 SELECTED TOPICS
2 cr.
An examination of current geologic trends and problems.

GEOL 1162 SELECTED TOPICS
3 cr.
An examination of current geologic trends and problems.

GEOL 1164 SELECTED TOPICS
4 cr.
An examination of current geologic trends and problems. Permission of instructor is required.

GEOL 1170 INTERNSHIPS
1–12 cr.
Experience with local and state cooperating agencies or departmental assistantships. Permission of instructor is required.

GEOL 1202 INTRODUCTION TO INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY
4 cr.
Geologically significant fossils are studied with emphasis on paleoecology and evolution. Laboratory work involves morphological study of fossils and use of fossils in solving geological and paleontological problems. Permission of instructor required if prerequisite is not met. Prequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1406 INTRODUCTION TO SOLID-EARTH GEOPHYSICS
4 cr.
Study in the application of gravity, seismology, magnetism and resistivity to determination o the composition and structure of the earth. Geophysical equipment operation, data collection, and interpretation are covered. Prerequisite: GEOL 0015.

GEOL 1905 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–12 cr.
This course permits undergraduates to explore specific topics in the geological sciences. The course is designed in a more flexible format than a directed study, stressing a higher degree of independent library research. Permission of instructor required.

GEOL 1906 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–12 cr.
This course provides the opportunity for undergraduates to obtain hands-on experience in geology by actively interacting with faculty members on research projects. Permission of instructor required.

GEOL 1907 DIRECTED READING
1–12 cr.

This course is designed to permit individual students the opportunity to explore in-depth specific topics in the geological sciences. The course is organized by a series of selected readings on specific topics. Permission of instructor required.

GERMAN (GER)

 

GER 0111 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
4 cr.
The objectives are to develop four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. For students without prior exposure to the language.

GER 0112 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
4 cr.
Second half of Elementary German 1. The objectives are to develop four language skills: understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: GER 0111

GER 0211 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
3 cr.

Conducted entirely in German, this course provides structured practice in understanding, speaking, reading (unedited texts), and writing. The language acquisition exercises are supplemented by an integrated and systematic review of grammar, emphasizing those structures that are needed for practical communication in authentic German. Designed for students who have completed a one-year college-level course of German or the equivalent. Prerequisite: GER 0112


GER 0212 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
3 cr.
Conducted entirely in German, this course enables students to describe in past, present, and future and to initiate and sustain a conversation. They discuss contemporary texts and topics, participate in small-group activities, and strengthen their writing skills through essays. Designed for students who have completed three semesters of college-level German or the equivalent. Prerequisite: GER 0211.

GER 0430 CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION
3 cr.
Designed for students who wish to acquire greater facility in speaking and writing in German. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 0212.

GER 0440 GERMAN SYNTAX AND SYNONYMY
3 cr.
Dwells on advanced aspects of idiomatic usage, semantic variation, and syntactic construction. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 0212

GER 0454 GERMANIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION TO 1650
3 cr.
Readings and discussions concentrate on intellectual and social developments as they relate to the history of German literature and culture and to the fabric of the German language to 1650. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 0212

GER 0455 GERMANIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION, 1650–PRESENT
3 cr.
Reading and discussions concentrate on intellectual and social developments as they relate to the history of German literature and culture and to the fabric of the German language from 1650 to present. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 0455.

GER 1491 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.

An in-depth investigation of a literary or cultural problem that lies outside of traditional literary-historical or genre classifications.  As the topics change, this course may be repeated for credit.


GER 1904 INDEPENDENT STUDY
0.5–15 cr.
A course designed for students who wish to work independently on individually designed projects.

 
JOHNSTOWN BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 

 

 Home | Top of Page > | Revised 6/18/07 10:36 AM Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us