University of Pittsburgh Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us
JOHNSTOWN BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 

 

Course Description

Note: (QR) denotes quantitative reasoning courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

 

ANTH 0800 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
3 cr.
By examining the behavior and customs of peoples throughout the world, the course considers what it means to be human. We will describe the patterns of marriage, family organization, warfare and political behavior, economic systems, rituals, etc., of other peoples, especially those of tribal societies, and compare these with American social patterns. Anthropological films and slide presentations will supplement lectures.

ANTH 1290 NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES
3 cr.
Presents a survey of the native American cultures north of Mexico, both historical and modern. Case studies from several different regions are used to provide in-depth material on North American Indian cultural patterns and present concerns.

ANTH 1580 RELIGION AND CULTURE
3 cr.
Religion is thought, felt, and acted out in social and cultural contexts. The relationship between religion and culture is the focus of this course. The objectives are to understand religion wherever found and to understand the anthropological approach in the cross-cultural study of religion. Religious belief, ritual, myth, dogma, and religious specialists in industrial and non-industrial societies are compared. Newly emerged religious movements are analyzed in the context of economic and social change.

ANTH 1630 ANTHROPOLOGY OF WOMEN
3 cr.
During this course students are asked to consider how gender differences relate to women's and men's roles in productive labor, in the disposition of property, and in the realm of family and kinship, politics and spirituality. Building on these discussions, participants will also examine the way in which gender and sexual differences are represented at the cultural and ideological level.

ANTH 1720 CARIBBEAN CULTURES
3 cr.
A cultural-historical perspective on contemporary Caribbean problems of underdevelopment and poverty, racial and ethnic stratification, political movements, family life, and religion.


ANTH 1800 DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

ANTH 1810 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

ANTH 1820 DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department, and in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

ANTH 1830 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity, usually off-campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

BIOLOGY (BIOL)

 

BIOL 0080 LIFE SCIENCES
3 cr.
Provides a broad base of learning related to the total discipline, in that selected biological relationships are used to demonstrate the scope of a rapidly changing science. After receiving credit with a grade of C or higher for general biology 1 (BIOL 0110) or any higher numbered biology course, a student may not enroll in or receive credits (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.

BIOL 0083 HUMAN ECOLOGY
3 cr.
A course for non-majors surveying how humans interact with their environment, especially short-term and long-term effects on the biosphere. After receiving credit with a grade of C or higher for general biology 1 (BIOL 0110) or any higher numbered biology course, a student may not enroll in or receive credits (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.

BIOL 0085 HUMAN HEALTH AND DISEASE
3 cr.
A course for non-majors in basic human physiology and disease mechanisms. After receiving credit with a grade of C or higher for general biology 1 (BIOL 0110) or any higher numbered biology course, a student may not enroll in or receive credits (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.

BIOL 0110 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1
3 cr.
A study of structure function and energetics on a cellular level, integrating biological systems and their control mechanisms. Required for all biology majors. A general chemistry or preparation for chemistry course is recommended as a corequisite.

BIOL 0111 GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY 1
1 cr.
A laboratory in conjunction with General Biology 1. Corequisite: BIOL 0110.

BIOL 0120 GENERAL BIOLOGY 2
3 cr.
A continuation of General Biology 1. Topic include genetics, growth and development, evolution and ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 0110.

BIOL 0121 GENERAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY 2
1 cr.
A laboratory in conjunction with General Biology 2. Corequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 0350 GENETICS
4 cr.
An introduction to the field of genetics discussing various patterns of inheritance in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, molecular genetics, laboratory genetic techniques, and genomics. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 0360 CELL BIOLOGY
3 cr.

A detailed consideration of the structure and function of eucaryotic and procaryotic cells and viruses. Lecture emphasizes chemical composition of cells, cell metabolism, and the molecular structure and function of major cell organelles. Prerequisites: BIOL 0120 or BIOSC 0160 and CHEM 0112 or 0120. Corequisite: BIOL 0360.


BIOL 0361 CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Cell Biology lecture. Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 0360.

BIOL 0950 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1
4 cr.
An introductory course in structure and function of the human body designed as a foundation course for nursing students. Emphasis is given to the chemical and cellular organization of the body, as well as the principal systems. Throughout the course, concepts of homeostasis, stress response, metabolic activities, and pathological diseases are continually stressed. The first term covers cell chemistry, cell ultrastructure and physiology, histology, integument, musculoskeletal physiology, nervous system, endocrine system, and sense organs.

BIOL 0970 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 2
4 cr.
The second term of the introductory course in structure and function of the human body for nursing students. The body systems discussed are the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive. Prerequisite: BIOL 0950.

BIOL 0980 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
3 cr.
An introduction to basic microbiology with emphasis on pathogenic microorganisms. Designed for students in the Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center nursing program. Corequisite: BIOL 0981

BIOL 0981 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
A lab to accompany Medical Microbiology. Corequisite: BIOL 0980.

BIOL 1110 BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
3 cr.
Examines the role of humanity in utilizing and protecting the vast variety of species and ecosystems that make up the natural world. In particular, the roles of science, management, policy, and advocacy will be elucidated in the context of strategies designed to conserve the diversity of life. Prerequisites: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1120 VERTEBRATE ANATOMY
4 cr.
A lecture/lab course with heavy emphasis on the anatomy of all mammalian organ systems. The lecture emphasizes human anatomy, and the lab uses extensive dissection of the cat and other mammalian organs. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1125 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY
3 cr.
Emphasizes homeostatic mechanisms of all mammalian organ systems with emphasis on humans. Prerequisites: BIOL 0120, CHEM 0112.

BIOL 1130 BIOLOGY OF PLANTS
3 cr.
Structure, reproduction, and phylogeny of the various groups of autotrophic plants. Consideration of the evolution of these plants through the process of natural selection. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.
   
BIOL 1132 POPULATION BIOLOGY
3 cr.
A survey of the genetics and ecology of biological populations from a conceptual and theoretical viewpoint.  Some modeling and simulations will be included. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120

BIOL 1135 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
4 cr.

This course will provide an overview of the fundamental principles of animal development, as well as highlight the recent advancements in this field. The material presented will include classical embryology of both invertebrate and vertebrate embryo, as well as more contemporary studies on the cellular mechanisms of axis determination, segmentation, germ layer specification and gastrulation. In addition topics in limb development, cell differentiation, and stem cell biology will be discussed. Course includes a required weekly laboratory where topics will be further explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 0360.


BIOL 1136 POPULATION GENETICS
3 cr.

An addendum to BIOL 0350 Genetics; describes the genetics of populations and the basic causes of evolutionary changes. Prerequisite: BIOL 0350.


BIOL 1137 MOLECULAR GENETICS
3 cr.
A general overview of molecular biology in a genetic context focusing on structure and function of biological molecules, particularly DNA, and details and applications of modern genetic techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 0350.
   
BIOL 1148 EMBRYOLOGY
4 crs.

A survey of reproduction and early developmental events among vertebrates and the final results as demonstrated by human anatomy. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120


BIOL 1158 LOCAL FLORA
4 cr.
A field- and laboratory-oriented course encouraging the taxonomic investigation of vascular plants of the immediate geographic area. Collecting and preserving samples and identifying features serve as a core for instruction. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1161 INTERNSHIP
1–15 cr.
Applied experience involving an agency outside UPJ. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1165 EVOLUTION
3 cr.
A general survey of organic evolution from the molecular to the macroevolutionary level. Historical and current controversies will be reviewed and discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120

BIOL 1170 VERTEBRATE BIOLOGY
3 cr.
A survey of the biology of vertebrate animals. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1171 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Emphasis on practices and techniques of wildlife management. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.
 
BIOL 1172 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
3 cr.

The goal of this course is to learn why animals do the things they do, as well as which questions to ask when investigating animal behavior. Humans are animals too, and the concepts we cover in this class can also serve as tools for understanding human behavior. In this course we will examine how natural selection, learning and cultural transmission shape the natural behaviors of animals. We will seek to understand both the proximate mechanisms underlying behavior and ultimate evolutionary reasons for the existence of a behavior. Course material will be covered in both lectures and in discussions of research papers.


BIOL 1173 MAMMALOGY
3 cr.
Classification, structure, habits, ecology, and distribution of mammals, with emphasis on North American forms. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1175 ORNITHOLOGY
3 cr.
The classification and natural history of birds. Those species living in Pennsylvania will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1176 VERTEBRATE NATURAL HISTORY
4 cr.
Natural history of the vertebrates: fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, and mammals. Local species are emphasized. Open to any student who has had one term of biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.
   
BIOL 1177 VERTEBRATE HISTOLOGY
3 cr.
Microanatomy of the mammal.  Characteristics and identification of normal mammalian tissues, functional interpretation of microstructure and fine structure. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1178 HUMAN SEXUALITY
3 cr.

A survey of biological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexual activity. Cross-listed as PSY 1178. Prerequisite: BIOL 120 or PSY 0200.


BIOL 1185 MICROBIOLOGY
4 cr.
A survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and fungi. Cell and organism structure and function are discussed. Industrial and medical microbiology and taxonomy of microorganisms are included. Laboratory activities include observation and characterization of representative microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 0360.

BIOL 1186 IMMUNOLOGY
3 cr.
This course serves as an introduction to the molecular and cellular basis of immune responses in vertebrates. Prerequisite: BIOL 0360.

BIOL 1187 LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
2 cr.
This course will expose the student to current laboratory techniques in the field of molecular biology using genetic engineering; hands-on experience in isolation and recombination of DNA will occur. Prerequisite: BIOL 1185.

BIOL 1188 LABORATORY TECHNIQUES IN IMMUNOLOGY
2 cr.
The purpose of this course is to expose the student, through discussion and hands-on experimentation, to procedures and principles used in the field of immunology. Prerequisites: BIOL 0361. Corequisite: BIOL 1186.

BIOL 1190 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
6 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1191 HEMATOLOGY
6 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1192 PARASITOLOGY
2 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1193 IMMUNOLOGY & SEROLOGY
2 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1194 BLOOD BANKING & COMPATABILITY TEST
6 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1195 MYCOLOGY
2 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

BIOL 1197 ECOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE
3 cr.
This course introduces the methodological and conceptual foundations of epidemiological science. Emphasis will be placed upon the links between ecological processes and the prevalence, incidence, and dissemination of emerging infectious diseases. Prerequisites: BIOL 0120. 

BIOL 1199 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
2 cr.
Students in this course will identify a research topic in biology, write a literature review, and prepare a research proposal. Students will gain expertise in writing in the scientific style, library research, and experimental design. The course will culminate with oral presentations of student proposals. Prerequisites: BIOL 0120. 

BIOL 1200 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Independent study or internship designed to give the student an opportunity to investigate a particular topic in some depth. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1210 BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Biodiversity Conservation lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1110.

BIOL 1225 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Animal Physiology lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1125.

BIOL 1230 BIOLOGY OF PLANTS LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Biology of Plants lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1130.
   
BIOL 1231 FIELD STUDIES IN ECOLOGY
3 cr.
The content of this course will vary depending on the instructor and the field site(s) chosen for instruction.  The subject matter of the course will address some aspect of the interaction between species and their habitat conditions. Except for a few lectures, activities will be entirely field-based often including remote field locations.  The field studies may be descriptive or experimental in nature, or both, and may involve a group project, individual projects or both. Prerequisite: BIOL 1515.

BIOL 1270 VERTEBRATE BIOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Vertebrate Biology lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1170.

BIOL 1271 WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Wildlife Management lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1171.
 
BIOL 1272 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR LABORATORY
1 cr.
The study of animal behavior is the study of everything animals do, regardless of whether one is studying single celled organisms, invertebrates, fish, birds or mammals. Animal behavior can be rich and fascinating, with as much capacity for intrigue, deception, and strategizing as any soap opera. The goal of this class is to explore and become familiar with some of the methods used to study and understand development, adaptive function, evolution and physiological control of behavior of vertebrates and invertebrates. In addition, students will design their own animal behavior experiment that can be tested observationally. Intellectual skills to be emphasized include the interpretation of graphs and other data, the critical evolution of the primary literature (i.e. research papers), the formulation of testable hypotheses, simple statistical analyses and writing of scientific reports.

BIOL 1273 MAMMALOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Mammalogy lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1173.

BIOL 1275 ORNITHOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with Ornithology lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1175.

BIOL 1515 GENERAL ECOLOGY
3 cr.
Energy relationships, nutrient cycling, population dynamics, environmental factors, and human ecology are stressed. Course is required for terrestrial ecology majors. Prerequisite: BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1520 AQUATIC ECOLOGY
3 cr.

An introduction to the animals and plants living in aquatic systems and the processes that control their distribution and abundance. Freshwater, estuarine, and marine systems will be explored. Permission of instructor required if prerequisites are not met. Prerequisite: BIOL 1515, CHEM 0112.


BIOL 1530 OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course embodies an interdisciplinary approach to the study of environmental issues. Reading assignments form the basis for class discussions and study. Occasional outside speakers address specific areas of interest. Prerequisite: BIOL 1515.


BIOL 1531 SEMINAR IN NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR
1 cr.
An examination of current thinking about the correlation between neural activity and behavior using examples from invertebrate and vertebrate simple systems. The role of single neurons and neural networks in controlling animal behavior will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 1125 or PSY 1500.

BIOL 1535 ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
3 cr.
This course covers philosophical aspects of the relationship between humans and their environment, including historical, ethical, and cultural dimensions and emerging concepts. Permission of instructor may replace the prerequisites. Prerequisites: BIOL 0080 or BIOL 0083 or BIOL 0120.

BIOL 1615 GENERAL ECOLOGY LABORATORY
1 cr.
Laboratory associated with General Ecology lecture. Corequisite: BIOL 1515.

 

BUSINESS (BUS)

 

BUS 0115 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES 1
3 cr.

This course required for all pre-business students covers the essential concepts of financial and managerial accounting. Financial accounting topics covered include the objectives of financial reporting, financial statements, "the accounting cycle," account classification, effect of business transactions on the accounting equation, and forms of business organization. Managerial accounting topics covered include an introduction to cost flow, cost volume profit analysis and managerial decision making. Prerequisite: MATH 0002 (College Algebra).


BUS 0200 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES 2
3 cr.

This course studies the accounting elements as they appear on the balance sheet and income statement. Topics covered include the activities of the accounting cycle, emphasizing adjusting entries and preparation of financial statements for service and merchandising corporations. An examination of the measurement and reporting of cash, receivables, inventories, plant and intangible assets, and other assets is also undertaken. The course also examines accounting and reporting for current and long term liabilities, revenue, expenses, and stockholders’ equity and the accounting worksheet. A practice set is completed. Prerequisite: BUS 0115 (Accounting Principles 1).


BUS 0300 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE
3 cr.

Views the finance function in terms of the acquisition and use of funds. Introduces the major tools of financial forecasting and planning and the major investment and financial decisions. Discusses the control function, the management of working capital, and the evaluation of capital projects. Prerequisite: BUS 0115.



BUS 0400 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
3 cr.
Explores the role of information systems in today's business organizations. Students will be introduced to the major components of information technology and their applications in particular types of business systems (MIS, DSS, AI, etc). It will explain the system development life cycle, data base management techniques, and concepts in end-user computing. Prerequisites: CS 0081 and CS0016 and CS 0081; Corequisite BUS 0500.

BUS 0500 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

Introductory course in management. This course is designed to enhance the student's knowledge and understanding of the four primary processes of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, with special emphasis on the planning and leading processes. Students will also explore major schools of management thought, the social role of business, managerial decision-making processes, and managerial ethics. Upon completion of this course, the student should have a clear understanding and knowledge of the current managerial environment, its scope, and its complexities.


BUS 0510 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
3 cr.

An introductory course in marketing. Examines the role of marketing in society and within the organization. Emphasis is placed on marketing mix issues: product, place, price , and promotion.


BUS 1010 BUSINESS ANALYSIS & MODELING
3 cr.

This course demonstrates integrated approaches to gathering and analyzing business data using Excel and other computer based tools such as advanced graphics, regression based forecasting, sensitivity analysis, data base and macro programming. Analytical projects focus on company and industry-specific data from both Web based and proprietary data base sources. Prerequisites: Bus 0300, BUS 0400, BUS 0500, BUS 0510. Corequisite:STAT 1040 or 1100.


BUS 1110 COST ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS
3 cr.
A review of the accounting for manufacturing costs including terminology, cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, activity-based costing, budgets and variance analysis. Prerequisite: BUS 0115 and BUS 0200.

BUS 1115 MANAGERIAL COST ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS
3 cr.
This course focuses on the use of cost accounting information as a tool for management decision making. Cost behavior and estimation, pricing, and use of relevant information are combined with profit and strategy considerations to practice making decisions consistent with business objectives. Presentation of results and recommendations to management is emphasized

BUS 1120 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
3 cr.
Application of financial accounting and reporting standards, as well as an emphasis on the conceptual framework of accounting. Course covers procedures of collecting, recording, and summarizing accounting data for financial reports and pursues in detail the recording and financial reporting of current assets and current liabilities according to approved financial accounting standards. Prerequisite: BUS 0115 and BUS 0200..

BUS 1130 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
3 cr.
A continuation of the application of financial accounting and reporting standards started in Intermediate Accounting I. Additional topics covered include revenue recognition, leases, pension accounting, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes, disclosures, and the statement of cash flows. International Financial Reporting Standards are introduced and discussed with each topic covered. Prerequisite: BUS 1120

BUS 1140 AUDITING
3 cr.
This course examines objectives, standards, and procedures of the professional auditor; types of examinations for rendering opinions on annual reports and for other attestation engagements; ethical and legal responsibilities of accountants; and the relationship of a professional accountant to management and the public. Prerequisite: BUS 1240, STAT 1040 OR 1100
 
BUS 1146 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING
3 cr.
An examination of the principles and methodology of fraud prevention, detection and investigation approaches. Topics include asset misappropriation and fraudulent financial statements. Application of accounting rules and accounting system's methodology versus the manipulation of each will be covered. Prerequisite: BUS 1130
 
BUS 1151 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY
3 cr.

A review and discussion of the accounting for specialized topics like partnerships, consolidation of financial statements, insolvency and bankruptcy, estates and trusts, foreign currency translation, and Securities and Exchange Commission reporting. Prerequisite: BUS 1240.


BUS 1155 GOVERNMENT AND NON-PROFIT ACCOUNTING
3 cr.
Application of the financial accounting and reporting standards applicable to (1) federal, state, and local governments and (2) nonprofit organizations. Introduction and analysis of the accounting used specifically for government funds, proprietary funds, and trust funds. Identifies the authoritative sources that accountants as well as auditors must adhere to in the preparation and examination of the financial statements of government and nonprofit entities. Prerequisite: BUS 1240 .

BUS 1160 TAX ACCOUNTING 1
3 cr.

Examination of the tax structure and requirements of individual taxation especially in the preparation of the Federal Form 1040 and appropriate schedules. The impact of economic decisions on the individual taxpayer is introduced. Prerequisite: BUS 0115.


BUS 1171 TAX ACCOUNTING 2
3 cr.

Examination of the tax structure and preparation of tax forms of Business entities such as sole proprietorship, partnership, and various types of corporations. Introduction and preparation of payroll tax accounting is also covered. Prerequisite: BUS 0115.


BUS 1190 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
3 cr.

Provides the techniques needed by a contemporary accounting systems analyst or auditor. The analytical skills needed to design and evaluate accounting systems are explained. The course covers the application of systems concepts to accounting situations with special emphasis on documentation and creating flow charts. Also provides hands-on experience of computerized accounting systems and requires the student to process accounting information on microcomputers. Prerequisites: BUS 1120, CS 0015.


BUS 1270 FINANCIAL REPORTING
3 cr.
This course includes discussion of current issues in the financial reporting environment. Course reviews reporting for revenue and expenses, assets, liabilities and compensation in terms of current rules and practices, and aspects of the regulatory structure and applicable legislative-based reforms. Course coverage is applicable for accounting and non-accounting majors. Prerequisites: BUS 0115,and BUS 0300.

BUS 1280 ACCOUNTING DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

BUS 1281 ACCOUNTING SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

BUS 1282 ACCOUNTING DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

BUS 1283 ACCOUNTING INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity usually off campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

BUS 1286 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP 1
3 cr.
This course is a beginning-level internship experience in which students provide technical expertise in accounting to business, industry, government, or nonprofit organizations. Academic credits are proportioned on the basis of approximately 10 hours per week per term equal to 3 credits. Placements are arranged by the coordinator and supervised by a faculty member in accounting. Students must write and present an extensive analysis of the experience. It is recommended that students have Junior or Senior status before consideration of an internship.

BUS 1287 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP 2
6 cr.
An advanced internship experience in which students provide technical expertise in accounting to business, industry, government, or nonprofit organizations.  Academic credits will be proportioned on the basis of approximately 10 hours per week per term equal to 3 credits. Placements are arranged by the coordinator and supervised by a faculty member in accounting. Students must write and present an extensive analysis of the internship experience. It is recommended that students have Junior of Senior status before consideration of an internship

BUS 1310 INVESTMENTS
3 cr.
Provides an understanding of the process of evaluating and selecting investments. Discusses investment techniques, vehicles, and strategies emphasizing the risk-return trade-offs. The operations of securities markets are explained, and investments in equities, fixed income securities, and other outlets are discussed. The course also familiarizes students with published financial data. Prerequisite: BUS 0300.

BUS 1315 PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING
3 cr.
An introduction and overview of personal financial planning. Topics include financial planning, managing assets, credit, insurance, investments, and retirement and estate planning. Prerequisite: BUS 0300

BUS 1330 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS
3 cr.

The course views financial statement analysis as an integral part of economic and financial decision theories with emphasis on the use of analytical techniques to predict corporate earnings, growth, and failure. Topics include credit and risk evaluation profitability analysis, financial statement component analysis, and financial statement forecasting. Prerequisite: BUS 0300.


BUS 1355 FINANCIAL MODELING
3 cr.
This course covers the theory and practice of corporate finance. Topics include stock and bond valuation, fundamentals of risk management, financial analysis and planning, and the techniques of short-term financial management. Prerequisites: BUS 0300, Corequisite: STAT 1040.

BUS 1356 CAPITAL BUDGETING
3 cr.

This course analyzes long-term decision making for the firm. The course will investigate various techniques in capital budgeting. An emphasis on the impact on shareholder wealth will be stressed. Additional topics include the analysis of cost of capital and capital structure issues. Dividend policy will be presented, as it impacts share value and financing. The course will use spreadsheet analysis models for case work. Prerequisites: BUS 0300, BUS 1355, STAT 1040.

 

BUS 1365 FINANCIAL SPECIAL TOPICS
3cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

 

BUS 1370 PORTFOLIO THEORY
3 cr.
The economics of pricing in the securities, options, commodities, and foreign exchange markets. Covers speculation and the nature of financial markets Prerequisite: BUS 1310.

BUS 1379 ENTREPRENEURIAL SEMINAR IN FINANCE
3 cr.
This course will provide participants with real-life experience in researching and preparing business plans. Following formal training in small business marketing, strategy and finance, students are assigned to work with selected entrepreneurs. By the end of the seminar, a written business plan will have been prepared which will serve as an internal guide to operations and/or be submitted to local lending institutions.

BUS 1410 BUSINESS DATABASE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of database systems. It provides an overview of database design and implementation. Prerequisite: BUS 0400.


BUS 1411 ADVANCED DATABASE TECHNOLOGIES
3 cr.

This course will cover additional aspects of database design, implementation, and administration using some of the latest technologies found in the industry (such as oracle, MS SQL, server, MYSGQL). Other topics covered may include the creation of database driven Web sites. Prerequisite: BUS 1410.

 
BUS 1412 GRAPHIC DESIGN
3 cr.
An introduction to the basic elements and techniques of graphics design, using current software packages to create various types of printed material. Prerequisite: Bus 0400

BUS 1415 WEB DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.

This course is intended to be an introductory course on creating web pages. It is designed for students to develop the essential basic skills in composing client-side based, interactive Web sites by using HTML and current Web technologies. This course will introduce students to software, design elements, and practices related to creating and maintaining home pages and sites on the World Wide Web. Prerequisite: BUS 0400.


BUS 1420 BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
3 cr.

This course introduces students to the process required to develop computer information systems. It emphasizes a structured approach to problem definition and resolution. It provides an overview of the systems analysis and design methodologies used to improve the efficiency of daily operations and decision-making processes at all levels of an organization. Prerequisite: BUS 1410.


BUS 1425 TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKS
3 cr.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of telecommunications and networks. Topics covered include types of networks, hardware protocols, topologies, the seven layers of operating systems interconnection (OSI), business voice communications, as well as data communications. Prerequisite: BUS 0400.
 
BUS 1426 COMPUTER HARDWARE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS
3 cr.

Information technology professionals will encounter a variety of platforms in their career. The role of the IT professional is to select, deploy, integrate, and administer platforms or components to support the organization’s infrastructure. This course covers the fundamentals of hardware and software and how they integrate to form essential components of its systems. Prerequisite: BUS 0400.


BUS 1435 PROJECT MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of project management and demonstrates its value in helping organizations successfully complete projects. The course will cover topics such as the project life cycle, and other valuable tools and techniques related to project management. The use of MS Project 2003 will also be included. Prerequisite: BUS 0400.

BUS 1441 DATA WAREHOUSING & DATA MINING
3 cr.
This course serves as an introduction to the topics of data warehousing and data mining. Students will be able to develop an appreciation, understanding, and awareness of the value of data warehouses, data marts, and data mining within an organization. Both technologies are vital in making key strategic, operational, and long-term decisions for the betterment of the organization while attempting to attain and/or gain competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 1410, and STAT 1040.

BUS 1445 MIS SPECIAL TOPICS (MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
This course involves a detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

BUS 1480 FINANCE DIRECTED READING  
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.

BUS 1482 FINANCE DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

BUS 1483 FINANCE INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity usually off-campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

BUS 1486 FINANCE INTERNSHIP 1
3 cr.
A beginning-level internship experience in which students provide technical expertise in finance to business, industry, government, or nonprofit organizations. Academic credits are proportioned on the basis of approximately 10 hours per week per term equal to 3 credits. Placements are arranged by the coordinator and supervised by a faculty member in finance. Students must write and present an extensive analysis of the internship experience.

BUS 1487 FINANCE INTERNSHIP 2
6 cr.
An advanced internship experience in which students provide technical expertise in finance to business, industry, government, or nonprofit organizations. Academic credits are proportioned on the basis of approximately 10 hours per week per term equal to 3 credits. Placements are arranged by the coordinator and supervised by a faculty member in finance. Students must write and present an extensive analysis of the internship experience.
 
BUS 1488 MIS INTERNSHIP
3 cr.

The MIS internship uses the workplace as a living laboratory for students to study in depth about the MIS discipline. An internship is primarily an academic experience, not a part-time or full-time job, in which students work for a firm or organization under a supervisor and faculty sponsor to achieve specific education objectives. Thus, a student earns degree credits for what is learned, not for work performed for the internship supervisor. Instructor consent required.

 
BUS 1489 MIS INDEPENDENT STUDY
3 cr.

The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity, usually off-campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member that is typically provided in directed reading or directed research courses. Instructor consent required.

 
BUS 1510 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

Advanced course in management. A study of current policy and practices in human resource management. Topics include recruitment, selection, training, performance appraisal, and compensation. Special attention is given to the legal environment surrounding human resource management. Corequisite: BUS 1520.


BUS 1515 RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, RETENTION, AND SEPARATION
3 cr.

This course examines key concepts and techniques for developing a process to recruit and select qualified staff and create an environment that encourages high performers to continue working for your organization. The course will also explore some key elements that an organization should consider in situations where an employment relationship must come to an end.


BUS 1520 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
3 cr.
This course integrates concepts from the behavioral sciences into the study of human behavior in business organizations. The course is designed to enhance the student's knowledge and understanding of individual, group, and organizational processes that affect human behavior in the formal organization (personality, perception, motivation, stress, power, and politics). It is also designed to enhance the student's knowledge and understanding of managerial techniques and applications that can be used to improve both individual and organizational performance (job design, management by objective, employer selection, etc.). Prerequisites: BUS 0500

BUS 1530 PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Advanced course in management. The focus is on solving production and operational problems using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Topics include total quality management, statistical process control, inventory control, scheduling, linear programming, pert, and critical path method (CPM). Prerequisites: BUS 0500, MATH 0121or 0120: Corequisite: STAT 1040 or STAT 1100.

BUS 1535 MARKETING RESEARCH
3 cr.
This is an intensive "hands on" course that integrates the concepts learned in undergraduate studies of marketing and statistics. The course is designed to enhance understanding of why and how organizations conduct market research to develop and deliver innovative goods and services. Prerequisites: BUS 0510. Corequisite: STAT 1040 or 1100.

BUS 1545 COMPENSATION, BENEFITS, AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course familiarizes students with the concepts of compensation management and employee benefits within the wider context of human resource management. The main components of compensation management are presented through: pay survey, job evaluation, and the design of pay structures. It also provides students with an understanding of the performance management process which includes the primary purposes: strategic, administrative, and developmental.  Prerequisite: BUS 0500 with a minimum grade of a C-.


BUS 1540 LEADERSHIP IN BUSINESS AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
This course examines the interactions between business and the larger social system in which it operates. The course takes a systems approach in examining the interface between business and society; the management of human resources as they relate to the quality of worklife; managerial ethics; consumerism and ecology issues; and the role of public policy in the managerial environment. In addition, some of the key issues affecting the contemporary manager will be explored. Prerequisite: BUS 0500 (Principles of  Management) with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: ENGWRT 1192 (Technical Writing) .

BUS 1560 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An advanced course in marketing focuses on the major decisions facing marketing professionals in their attempt to meet consumer demand while achieving corporate objectives. Emphasis is on case analyses, and the development of a marketing plan for a "real world" client. Prerequisites: BUS 0500, and BUS 0510.

BUS 1570 BUSINESS LAW 1
3 cr.
Deals with the law of contracts and examines agencies for the enforcement of legal rights. Surveys aspects of legal systems of importance to business. Includes the laws of incorporation, negotiable instruments, real property, and creditor rights.

BUS 1575 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
3 cr.
This is an advanced course in marketing that focuses on how consumers make purchase decisions in a market-oriented society. The course then builds upon this knowledge by examining how managers can use this information to develop marketing strategies for their own products. Prerequisites: BUS 0510.

BUS 1580 SALES MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course begins with an introduction to the field of sales and sales management. We will explore ethical issues in selling and some specific communication principles related to the sales function. You will then learn the elements of the sales cycle from determining who to call, to planning the sales call, to actually making the sales call and completing follow up activities. Time will be devoted to learning how to respond to objections and developing your negotiating skills. You will have the opportunity to put these skills into action through a series of role play exercises.


BUS 1582 INTERNET MARKETING
3 cr.
This course is an exploration of various potential applications of internet marketing in addition to the evolving role of e-commerce. Topics include web business models, online branding, creating community and commitment, online research, and the impact of the internet on B2C and B2B enterprises. It should be noted that this is a marketing strategy course. It does not involve hands-on applications of the technology, but it does assume a user-based understanding of the web and associated information technology and the ability to use the internet for research purposes.

BUS 1584 PRODUCT MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An advanced course in marketing focusing on the development and management of products, including brand management and new product development. Prerequisite: BUS 1560.

BUS 1585 PROMOTION MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An advanced course in marketing focusing on the role of marketing communications, with emphasis on the development of an integrated marketing communications campaign. Prerequisite: BUS 1560.

BUS 1586 PRICING MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An advanced course in marketing combining economic and marketing principles with accounting and financial information to analyze the pricing policies used by real world organizations Prerequisite: BUS 1560.

BUS 1587 DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
An advanced course in marketing focusing on management of distribution channels, with emphasis on studying channels of existing "real world" organizations. Prerequisite: BUS 1560.

BUS 1670 MARKETING SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.

Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Prerequisites: BUS 0500, 0510.


BUS 1671 MARKETING INTERNSHIP 1
3 cr.
The marketing internship uses the workplace as a living laboratory for students to study in depth a marketing discipline. An internship is primarily an academic experience, not a part-time or full-time job, in which students work for a firm or organization under a supervisor and faculty sponsor to achieve specific educational objectives. Thus, a student earns degree credits for what is learned, not for work performed for the internship supervisor.

BUS 1680 MANAGEMENT DIRECTED READING
1–6 cr.

The student undertakes a specified course of study, comparable in content to a special topics course, under the direct supervision of a faculty member.


BUS 1681 MANAGEMENT SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
Detailed analysis of a particular topic not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

BUS 1682 MANAGEMENT DIRECTED RESEARCH
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes a defined task of research on campus under the supervision of a faculty member of an appropriate department in which the fruits of the research are embodied in a thesis, extended paper, laboratory report, or other appropriate form.

BUS 1683 MANAGEMENT INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
The student undertakes, under specific conditions, an independent program of study, research, or creative activity usually off campus and with less immediate and frequent guidance from the sponsoring faculty member than is typically provided in directed reading and directed research courses.

BUS 1686 MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP 1
3 cr.
The Management Internship uses the workplace as a living laboratory for students to study in depth a managerial discipline. An internship is primarily an academic experience, not a part-time or full-time job, in which students work for a firm or organization under a supervisor and faculty sponsor to achieve specific educational objectives. Thus, a student earns degree credits for what is learned, not for work performed for the internship supervisor.

BUS 1687 MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP 2
6 cr.

The Management Internship uses the workplace as a living laboratory for students to study in depth a managerial discipline. An internship is primarily an academic experience, not a part-time or full-time job, in which students work for a firm or organization under a supervisor and faculty sponsor to achieve specific educational objectives. Thus, a student earns degree credits for what is learned, not for work performed for the internship supervisor.

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

 

CHEM 0080 CHEMISTRY, MAN, AND SOCIETY
3 cr.

Course is designed primarily for students with no prior chemistry background and focuses on the intricate link between chemistry and societal, political, economic, and ethical issues of daily life.  The course has two goals: (1) equip students with the tools necessary to understand the chemistry of everyday life and (2) develop critical thinking skills necessary to assess the risks and benefits of chemical developments and technology-based issues. After receiving credit with a grade of C or higher for general chemistry 1 or any higher numbered chemistry course, a student may not enroll in or receive credit (or equivalent transfer credits) for this course.


CHEM 0085 DRUGS AND THE HUMAN BODY
3 cr.

Course is designed primarily for students with no prior chemistry background, but who still want to learn about the interactions of drugs with the human body. The course deals with the sources and regulation of drugs, what happens to drugs after they enter the body, and the characteristic effects of high use/high abuse drugs. By the end of the course, students should have a better appreciation of the concept of risk/benefit ratio, which applies to all medications.


CHEM 0105 PREPARATION GENERAL CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
This course in designed for those students who intend to take General Chemistry 1 and General Chemistry 2, but whose mathematical or chemistry backgrounds are judged by their advisors and the placement exam to be relatively weak. The course emphasizes stoichiometry (chemical calculations), chemical equations, gas laws, elementary atomic structure and periodic properties of elements. Students who take this course must receive a D or better before they can take CHEM 0111.

CHEM 0111 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1
4 cr.

General Chemistry 1 and 2 constitute a two-term introduction to the fundamental properties of matter. General Chemistry 1 covers stoichiometry; the properties of solids, liquids and gases; thermochemistry; and the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 0105. Corequisite: CHEM 0113.

Comment: Students may not take this course unless they have obtained an appropriate test score on the Chemistry Placement Test or have obtained at least a D grade in CHEM 0105.


CHEM 0112 GENERAL CHEMISTRY 2
4 cr.

General Chemistry 1 and 2 constitute a two-term introduction to the fundamental properties of matter. General Chemistry 2 covers kinetics, coordination chemistry, redox reactions, chemical equilibrium, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: CHEM 0111. Corequisite: CHEM 0114.


CHEM 0113 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I
1 cr.
A laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in General Chemistry 1. Corequisite: CHEM 0111.

CHEM 0114 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II
1 cr.

A laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in General Chemistry 2. Prerequisite: CHEM 0111, CHEM 0113. Corequisite: CHEM 0112.


CHEM 0190 CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
3 cr.
An introductory course designed primarily for students in the health professions. Stresses general concepts of inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 0192.

CHEM 0192 CHEMISTRY FOR THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS LABORATORY
1 cr.
This lab is designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in Chemistry for the Health Professions lecture. Corequisite: CHEM 0190.

CHEM 0230 FUNDAMENTALS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
4 cr.
This course is for those biology students who select the terrestrial ecology option and to secondary education biology students. Using biological examples, basic concepts of organic chemistry are introduced. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 0112, CHEM 0114. Corequisite: CHEM 0235.

CHEM 0231 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1
4 cr.

This course is the first part of a two-term sequence, and it deals with the chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, and free radical and ionic mechanisms of organic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 0112 AND CHEM 0114. Corequisite: CHEM 0233.


CHEM 0232 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 2
4 cr.
This course is the second part of a two-term organic chemistry sequence and deals with the study of the synthesis of and physical, spectroscopic, and chemical properties of the major classes of organic compounds. The course also includes a brief account of the chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: CHEM 0231. Corequisite: CHEM 0234.

CHEM 0233 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 1
1 cr.
A laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in Organic Chemistry 1. Experiments stress mainly, but not exclusively, techniques and simple synthetic procedures. Prerequisite: CHEM 0114. Corequisite: CHEM 0231.

CHEM 0234 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 2
1 cr.
A laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in Organic Chemistry 2. It stresses functional group transformations, syntheses, qualitative organic analysis, and separation and spectral techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 0233. Corequisite: CHEM 0232.

CHEM 0235 FUNDAMENTALS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
1 cr.
This laboratory course is designed to augment and clarify the topics covered in the CHEM 0230 lecture. The experiments included in this lab stress mainly, but not exclusively, techniques and simple synthetic procedures. Prerequisite: CHEM 0112. Corequisite: CHEM 0230.

CHEM 0325 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
4 cr.
This course and its lab are concerned with the treatment of equilibria that are of analytical importance and with an introduction to basic methods of chemical analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 0112, MATH 0004.

CHEM 1131 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
Modern bonding theories are developed to the level that permits some understanding of the effects of structure and bonding on chemical properties. Periodic relationships are discussed and applied to selected families of elements. Emphasis is placed on those aspects of structure, bonding, and periodic relationships that are helpful in unifying a large body of chemical knowledge. Selected topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry are discussed. Prerequisites: CHEM 0232, consent of the instructor. Corequisite: CHEM 1132.

CHEM 1132 PHYSICAL-INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
2 cr.
This laboratory focuses on synthesis and characterization of inorganic species. Representative examples of transition metal coordination complexes and organometallic and main group compounds are prepared using various synthetic techniques on a micro- and semimicro-scale. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are employed in order to examine reaction kinetics, study molecular dynamics (fluxional molecules), as well as for structural characterization. Equal emphasis on theory and application. Selected preparations from the current inorganic literature are included. Prerequisite: CHEM 0234. Corequisite: CHEM 1131.

CHEM 1133 SYNTHESIS & CHARACTERIZATION LABORATORY
1 cr.

Laboratory focuses on various methods used to prepare and characterize organic and inorganic species. Representative examples of transition metal coordination complexes, organometallic and main group compounds, and organic compounds with medicinal applications are prepared and characterized. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and physical methods are employed to examine reaction kinetics and to study molecular dynamics, as well as for structural characterization. Selected preparations from the current organic, medicinal, and inorganic literature are included. Equal emphasis on theory and application. Prerequisites: CHEM 0232, CHEM 0234.


CHEM 1291 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY
6 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center (CMMC). It is required for and restricted to medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

CHEM 1292 URINALYSIS & BODY FLUID ANALYSIS
2 cr.
This course is taught at Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center by members of the UPJ clinical faculty. Required for medical technology students enrolled in the CMMC program.

CHEM 1321 BIOCHEMISTRY 1
3 cr.
This course is the first course of a two-semester sequence covering the chemistry of life. It covers protein structure, protein function, and central metabolism  Prerequisite: CHEM 0232. Corequisite: CHEM 1323.

CHEM 1322 BIOCHEMISTRY 2
3 cr.
This course is a continuation of Biochemistry 1. It covers metabolism and the flow of genetic information. Prerequisite: CHEM 1321.

CHEM 1323 BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY
1 cr.

A laboratory course to accompany the Biochemistry 1 lecture. The course covers basic biochemical techniques with different sorts of macromolecules. Corequisite: CHEM 1321.


CHEM 1325 SPECTRAL ANALYSIS
3 cr.
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and applications of traditional and modern spectroscopic techniques. These techniques are subsequently used for the identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0232.    

CHEM 1327 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS
4 cr.
The lecture emphasizes the theory of operation of various important instrumental techniques of analysis. The accompanying laboratory covers the operation of specific instruments. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 0325.

CHEM 1329 CHEMICAL SEPARATIONS
2 cr.
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and applications of traditional and modern chromatographic techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 1325.

CHEM 1330 TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
Possible topics include chemistry of natural products, organic synthesis, mechanisms of organic reactions, and reaction intermediates. Prerequisite: CHEM 0232.

CHEM 1331 POLYMER CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
This course involves a survey of organic and physical properties of macromolecules. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 0232.

CHEM 1332 MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
This course starts with a discussion of the general concepts of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry, and it concludes with an extended look at a number of specific drug families. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 0232.

CHEM 1341 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 1
3 cr.
This course is the first of a two-term sequence;  it is a mathematically based introduction to quantum mechanics. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, molecular spectroscopy, group theory of symmetry, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 0152, MATH 0231.

CHEM 1342 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 2
3 cr.
This course is the second of a two-term sequence; it rigorously deals with the theory and application of chemical thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. Prerequisites: PHYS 0152, MATH 0231. Corequisite: CHEM 1343.

CHEM 1343 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
2 cr.
Experiments are designed to illustrate physiochemical principles and techniques and to supplement the lecture by covering material that was not covered in the lecture in detail. This course involves significant laboratory report writing and use of existing software packages, including spreadsheets, molecular modeling, mathematical analysis, and statistical analysis. Corequisite: CHEM 1342.

CHEM 1360 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
Designed to give the student an opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth.

CHEM 1371 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH
1–4 cr.
Research directed by a member of the chemistry faculty. Approximately four hours per week per credit.

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (CET)

 

CET 0020 ELEMENTARY SURVEYING
3 cr.
Introduction to the use of modern surveying instruments, equipment, and measurement methods. Emphasis is on the field work in measuring a given traverse and locating the control data for making a topographic map. Other topics include construction, route, and boundary control surveys. Prerequisite: ET 0023

CET 0021 CIVIL COMPUTATIONS AND DESIGN
3 cr.
Continuation of surveying principles and calculations experienced in Elementary Surveying. Introduction into site development and mapping using a computer-aided design (CAD) system. Other computer-aided analysis and design methods will be presented for use with highway and route surveying, layout, and planning. Prerequisites: CET 0020, ET 0030, and ET 0011.

CET 1111 STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN
4 cr.
Application of principles of mechanics in the design of steel beams, tension and compression members, beam columns, and bolted and welded connections. The latest American Institute of Steel Construction-Load and Resistance Factor Design (AISC-LRFD) specification is used. Prerequisites: ET 0011, ET 0053, and ET 0054.

CET 1112 REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN
4 cr.
Concrete strength design and behavior of beams, columns, footings, slabs, and retaining structures using current American Concrete Institute (ACI) code requirements. Prerequisites: ET 0011, ET 0053, and ET 0054.

CET 1113 ADVANCED STRUCTURES
3 cr.
Structural analysis of determinate and indeterminate trusses and frames. Analysis and design, using the AISC-LRFD specifications, of continuous and composite beams, frames, and plate girders. Classical methods of analysis such as slope-deflection and virtual work are emphasized. Other topics include influence lines, deflection, and approximate methods of analysis. Prerequisite:: ET 0030 and 0053 and 0054 and CET 1111.

CET 1121 HIGHWAY SURVEYING AND DESIGN
3 cr.
Highway location surveys, geometric design, and construction stakeout. Emphasis is placed on the design of horizontal and vertical alignments from field surveys and topographic maps. Elements of design include horizontal, circular, and spiral curves; superelevation; vertical profiles; vertical parabolic curves; cross-sections; earthwork quantities; and drainage. The Land Development Desktop (LDD) is used in the planning and design process, including preparation of design plans for a semester-long highway project. Prerequisites: CET 0020, CET 0021, CET 1123, CET 1140.

CET 1122 PHOTOGMTRY & PHOTO INTERPRTTN
3 cr.
A study of the fundamental principles and techniques in the identification of natural and cultural features as contained in aerial photographs and their application in engineering; hydrology and watershed areas, location of highways, landslides, and soil identification. Also studies the fundamental principles of map-making from aerial photo graphs and the determination of horizontal distances and differences in elevation.

CET 1123 TRANSPORTATION
4 cr.

Study of transportation systems including planning, analysis, design and management. Emphasis is placed on traffic volumes, speed-flow-density relationships, highway safety, capacity analysis and level of service, intersection control, forecasting travel demand, evaluating alternatives, environmental and social considerations, and transportation systems management. The lab focuses on spot speed, traffic volume, travel delay, parking and accident studies. The highway capacity software is utilized in the design of signals and in the traffic analysis of highway segments and intersections. Prerequisites: CET 0021, ET 0023, and ET 0054.


CET 1124 PAVEMENT DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

Study of properties and tests of asphaltic materials, pavement design and management. Emphasis is placed on Superpave mix design; pavement stresses; design of flexible and rigid pavements using methods by asphalt institute (AI), American association of state highways and transportation officials (AASHTO), and Portland Cement Association (PCA). Other topics include classification and treatment of soil, subsurface drainage, condition surveys, pavement distress and maintenance, and roadway management systems. Current policies from AASHTO and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) are incorporated. Prerequisites: CET 1123 and CET 1131.


CET 1131 SOIL ENGINEERING
4 cr.
Topics include the identification and classification of soils, hydraulic properties, consolidation characteristics and shear strength properties of soils, techniques of subsurface investigation, and the geology of natural deposits. The effects of soil conditions on the construction process are discussed. Prerequisites: ET 0053 and ET 0054.           

CET 1132 FOUNDATION DESIGN
3 cr.
Geotechnical aspects of foundation design including determination of ultimate and allowable bearing capacities for shallow foundations on soil and rock, design and construction of pile foundations and drilled caissons, earth pressure theories, retaining wall stability and design details, anchored bulkheads, sheet pile walls, and excavation bracing. Prerequisite: CET 1131.

CET 1140 HYDROLOGY AND HYDRAULICS ENGINEERING
3 cr.
A study of the basic principles of hydrology and hydraulics and their application to the solution of water resource problems. Topics include the hydrologic cycle, rainfall runoff relationships, analysis and design of detention facilities, open channels, reservoir routing, and channel routing. Prerequisite: ET 0023 and MET 1154 and MATH 0221 or 0220; Corequisite: CET 1144.

CET 1141 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
3 cr.
An introduction to causes of pollution in the environment and related engineering solutions. Areas of investigation include water supply, wastewater, solid wastes, and air pollution. Methods of abating present pollution and planning to avoid future pollution are investigated. Prerequisites: CHEM 0111, ET 0023, and MATH 0221 or 0220.         

CET 1142 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER
4 cr.
A problem-oriented course in which the water supply and wastewater system needs for a community are determined. A water supply system and a distribution system are designed. The various unit operations of water treatment and wastewater treatment plants are also designed. A water chemistry laboratory and problem-solving recitation period are included in the course. Prerequisites: CHEM 0111, ET 0023, and CET 1140.

CET 1144 HYDRAULICS LABORATORY
1 cr.

Laboratory and field activities in conjunction and association with hydrology and hydraulics. Corequisite: CET 1140.


CET 1151 MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION
3 cr.

Acquaints the student with the practical difficulties in the selection, testing, and use of construction materials in relation to function, environment, and cost. Major emphasis on aggregate, Portland cement, concrete additives, and bituminous materials in civil engineering works. Problems associated with concrete and bituminous mixtures and methods of mix design are included. Current materials-testing techniques are utilized in the laboratory. Material applications of masonry are introduced. . Prerequisite: ET 0053.


CET 1152 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PRACTICE
4 cr.
Fundamental management principles for construction contracting, project organization and planning, scheduling and control with critical path method (CPM) techniques, estimating, bonding, material, labor, insurance, and equipment utilization. Prerequisite: CET 1151.

CET 1183 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1184 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1185 JUNIOR SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1186 JUNIOR SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1187 SENIOR SEMINAR FALL
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1188 SENIOR SEMINAR SPRING
0 cr.
Practicing professional engineers speak on a variety of subjects of interest to the civil engineering profession.

CET 1190 SENIOR PROJECT  
3 cr.

 Employs previously learned material in Civil Engineering Technology. The project involves design and analysis of a new or modified Civil Engineering project or system with demonstrated feasibility. To be completed in the last term.


CET 1195 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL
1 cr.

A written proposal detailing the functional specifications for a project and the time schedule for completion will be submitted. After approval of the proposal by the faculty, a faculty advisor will be assigned and the senior project is begun. To be completed in the next to last term.


CET 1196 SPECIAL PROJECT—INTERNSHIP
1–4 cr.

The internship is designed to give the student an opportunity to study a particular aspect of the discipline in some depth. Admission is by consultation with and permission of the departmental faculty.


CET 1197 SPECIAL PROJECT—DIRECTED STUDY
1–4 cr.

The directed study is designed to give the student an opportunity to study a particular aspect of the discipline in some depth. Admission is by consultation with and permission of the departmental faculty.


CET 1198 SPECIAL PROJECT—INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–4 cr.
The independent study is designed to give the student an opportunity to study a particular aspect of the discipline in some depth. Admission is by consultation with and permission of the departmental faculty.

CET 1199 SENIOR PROJECT
3 cr.
Employs previously learned material in civil engineering technology. The project involves design and analysis of a new or modified civil engineering project or system with demonstrated feasibility. To be completed in the last term. Prerequisite: CET 1195.

COED PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PEDC)

 

PEDC 0001 BEGINNING SWIMMING
1 cr.

For students who are unable to swim or who can swim very little. Opportunities are presented to learn basic functional aquatic skills and basic strokes. Students are permitted to set their own achievement goals. Instruction is on an individual basis.


PEDC 0002 INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING
1 cr.
For students who have learned the mechanics of basic aquatic strokes and are interested in the development of proper rhythm and timing necessary for good performance in swimming. Students are permitted to set their own achievement goals. Instruction is on an individual basis.

PEDC 0010 WATER AEROBICS
1 cr.
Improve your fitness in the enjoyable aquatic environment. This program is designed for all ages. Each enrollee will be permitted to participate at their own level gradually improving their muscle tone, cardiac, and respiratory fitness levels. This program will be conducted in shallow water so that the non-swimmer may participate.

PEDC 0018 DIRECTED STUDY
1–2 cr.
If students are interested in developing a program independently or if students are interested in a program not offered formally by this department, they may develop a contract with an instructor in a specific area and present this contract for approval to the program coordinator.

PEDC 0022 AEROBIC DANCE
1 cr.
Improve your fitness levels with this aerobic dance to music course, one of America's most popular ways to exercise. This program is for all ages. Each student will be permitted to participate at his/her own level, gradually improving muscle tone, cardiac, and respiratory fitness.

PEDC 0026 AQUATIC CONDITIONING
1 cr.
Good swimmers who want to learn how to use swimming to maintain or improve their physical fitness should register for this course. Students may determine their capacity for exercise, and they may learn how to apply this effort in the water.

PEDC 0029 WEIGHT TRAINING—MEN
1 cr.
This class is designed to provide the male student with the opportunity to develop and practice basic weight training techniques. With the guidance of the instructor, the student will be encouraged to develop an individualized self-designed program. The emphasis of this course will be placed on progressive-resistive exercises.

PEDC 0030 WEIGHT TRAINING—WOMEN
1 cr.
This class is designed to provide the female student with the opportunity to develop and practice basic weight training techniques. With the guidance of the instructor, the student will be encouraged to develop an individualized self-designed program. The emphasis of this course will be placed on progressive-resistive exercises.

PEDC 0032 MODERN DANCE 2
1 cr.
This course is designed for those students who have mastered beginning dance technique and wish to gain more advanced skills. Advanced technique and compositional work is stressed. Course objectives include increased technical skills, awareness and appreciation of modern dance as an art form, ease in phrasing rhythmical movement and skill in improvisational movement

PEDC 0034 BALLET 2
1 cr.
An intermediate class, taught as a continuation of ballet 1; also a class for students who may have some ballet training before coming to college. Audition for class eligibility at the first class session or permission of instructor

PEDC 0041 JAZZ 1
1 cr.
Fundamentals of jazz dance for beginning dance students. Class includes warm-up, center floor, and cross floor movement combinations, contemporary jazz and pop music is emphasized.

PEDC 0042 JAZZ 2
1 cr.
A continuation of the basic fundamentals learned in Jazz 1. More emphasis is placed on longer routines and more complicated movement sequences. It is an intermediate jazz class.

PEDC 0060 BASKETBALL 1—COEDUCATIONAL
1 cr.
Supervised competition follows a four week conditioning period in which individual skills and team strategy are stressed. Opportunity to improve on previously acquired skills and become a team member is provided .

PEDC 0063 BASKETBALL 2—COEDUCATIONAL
1 cr.
Total team play is discussed and practiced. On-court work involves many phases of the five-on-five game. Although skill work is not emphasized, it is still covered within the team concept. Strategy and tactics, including game situations, are part of the class. Attendance is required, and role is taken at every class. Tests include shooting and a scouting report.

PEDC 0065 VOLLEYBALL
1 cr.
This course is designed to introduce the beginner to the significant components of volleyball. Basic skills to be taught will include the overhead volley, forearm pass, service, spike, individual block and defensive recovery skills. A 4-2 right side setter offensive system will be introduced with a 6 back and a 6 up defensive system. All rules and regulations will be reviewed during the course.

PEDC 0087 PERSONAL DEFENSE
1 cr.
Offers physical conditioning and self-defense through the RAD (Rape Aggression Defense) system. Basic self-defense from various attacks will be taught. Students will develop a deep respect for others, inner security, and self confidence. This class is for women only. It is a national course taught throughout the country to female college students. The class develops various options for women to defend themselves from attack.

PEDC 0088 KAYAK PADDLING
1 cr.

Instruction for the beginning kayaker in basic strokes and rolls. This course offers Red Cross certification for basic kayak paddling, pool practice sessions, and an open-water trip.


PEDC 0099 BASIC ROCK CLIMBING
1 cr.
Beginning with bouldering, the course will deal primarily with rope handling and moving on vertical rock planes in a safe manner. Covered in this course are bouldering, friction and balance climbing, 3-point suspension, use of ropes, know craft, body rappelling, free rigging climbs, mountain safety, basic belaying, use of webbing (slings and harnesses), chimney techniques and natural protection.

PEDC 0100 LIFEGUARDING
2 cr.
For swimmers at an intermediate-level or above who wish to gain National Red Cross certification in lifeguard training. This course is specifically designed to prepare students for lifeguarding at pools and open water, nonsurf beaches. This class also provides Red Cross certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for the professional rescuer and community first aid.

PEDC 0103 AEROBIC EXERCISE 1
1 cr.

This course is designed to introduce students to aerobic exercise using cardio equipment (treadmills, bicycles, elliptical, etc.) and stretching exercises through yoga and Pilates.


PEDC 0123 FIRST AID AND CPR
1 cr.
The purpose of the course is to prepare people to care for injuries and to meet emergencies when medical assistance is delayed. The course is taught through lectures, discussion, demonstrations, and mannequin practice.

PEDC 0162 DANCE BASICS
1 cr.
For those people who always had a desire to learn, to dance but were intimidated by a formal class. Break your own stereotype! If increasing your flexibility, strength, coordination, and rhythmic awareness is a goal, you can do it in an enjoyable atmosphere of sound and movement. Learn dance fundamentals that are used in ballet, jazz, tap, modern dance, and musical theater. Some social dance and folk dance movements are included. Barre and floor warm up and movement sequences are contained in each class.

PEDC 0184 SCUBA 1
2 cr.
Provides National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) or Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) open-water instruction and certification for the beginning student who wishes to learn safe scuba diving techniques. Pool, classroom, and open-water training are required for certification. The student must provide personal diving gear (mask, fins, snorkel, and boots) by the third class meeting; all other equipment for the pool activities will be provided. The student must also provide all the equipment necessary for open-water training (which may be rented).

PEDC 0185 SCUBA 2
1 cr.
Provides naui or padi advanced openwater instruction and certification for the certified diver who wishes to gain specialized diving experience. Activities include instruction and supervision in advanced navigation, search and recovery, night diving, and deep diving. The student must provide all of the equipment necessary for openwater training. This equipment may be rented if not owned

PEDC 0199 LIFEGUARD INSTRUCTOR
2 cr.
The purpose of this course is to train instructor candidates to teach Red Cross lifeguarding and water safety courses. The course is dedicated to developing the skills needed to plan, conduct, and evaluate Red Cross courses including lifeguard training, CPR for the professional rescuer, automated external defibrillation essentials, oxygen administration, preventing disease transmission, community water safety, basic water rescue and lifeguard instructor aide. Upon successful completion, students will receive Red Cross instructor certification in lifeguard training.

PEDC 0200 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR
2 cr.
The purpose of this course is to train instructor candidates to teach Red Cross swimming and water safety courses. The course is dedicated to developing the skills needed to plan, conduct, and evaluate Red Cross courses including Learn to Swim levels 1–6, Parent & Child Aquatics, and Water Safety Outreach (includes Basic Water Rescue and presentations on Water Safety Today, General Water Safety, Home Pool Safety, and Parent Orientation to Swimming Lessons). Upon successful completion, students will receive Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Certification.

PEDC 0212 MODERN DANCE 3
1 cr.
This course is designed for those students who have mastered intermediate dance skills and wish to challenge themselves to achieve advanced levels of dance technique. Performance quality movement is stressed. Course objectives include highly developed technical skills, recognition of traditional modern dance forms, increased awareness of phrasing, and development of improvisational movement.

PEDC 0231 SOCCER 1
1 cr.
For the beginner who wishes to develop competence in the skills, rules, and strategies required for participation in soccer

PEDC 1035 SOCCER COACHING 
1 cr.
To develop an understanding coaching mentality in the sport of soccer through instruction and application of coaching techniques.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES (CAS)

 

CAS 0001 UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP
1 cr.
This course is designed to help students maximize their potential for academic success in college by presenting various methods and procedures for successful management of their college learning experience. The course is intended to provide participants an opportunity to learn, adopt, and adapt techniques, strategies, and skills to enhance their college success. The course will center on academic content and readings assigned by the instructor. Registration in this course is restricted to students who have successfully completed fewer than 15 credits. A student who fails this course is required to repeat it prior to progressing beyond 30 credits.

CAS 0904 ACADEMIC SKILLS FOCUS COURSE
1 cr.
The course is designed to prepare students for college experience by helping them to acquire self confidence; refine their classroom skills; set and achieve their academic and career goals; accept challenges and rewards openly; and find, analyze, and solve problems skillfully.

CAS 1902 INTERNSHIP
1–6 cr.
An internship is a special type of independent study in which the student works in a nonacademic setting. The internship should be directly related to an academic discipline, and the student's learning is evaluated and graded by a faculty member.

CAS 1917 DIRECTED STUDY: FOCUS GROUP
1-6 cr.
This course examines the academic and psychological components of effective college learning. Students will explore their identities as learners and build skills to maximize academic potential.

 

COMMUNICATION : RHETORIC & COMMUNICATION (COMMRC)

 

COMMRC 0030 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
An introduction to communication theory with consideration given to how theoretical stances relate to areas of communication study including interpersonal communication, small-group communication, mass communication, organizational communication, and gender issues in communication.

COMMRC 0052 PUBLIC SPEAKING
3 cr.
Introduction to the composition, delivery, and critical analysis of informative and persuasive speeches.

COMMRC 0083 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
An analysis of various foreign cultures and U.S. subcultures focusing on communication behavior. Attitudes held by each group and problems that may arise in exchange of ideas between groups are studied.

COMMRC 0320 MASS COMMUNICATION PROCESS
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to mass communication, exploring the culture, technological, and economic history of the media from newspapers to the internet, the changing relationships between media industries, audiences, and culture, and the basic history and concepts of mass communication research.

COMMRC 0600 THEORIES OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.

Comparison of ways researchers conceptualize and study interpersonal, relational communication. Prerequisite: COMMRC 0030.


COMMRC 0650 THEORIES OF PERSUASION
3 cr.
Survey of 21st-century theories of persuasion, with analysis of research about how the spoken word and the visual image influence public belief and action.

COMMRC 0700 COMMUNICATION RESEARCH METHODS
3 cr.

The research methods course will provide an overview of different research methodologies, which are utilized within the communication discipline. The course will present a foundational base of theory through lecture, and encourage students to apply their knowledge through in-class exercises. A large portion of the in-class exercises will ask students to analyze and interpret data through the use of statistical software. Students will also be expected to read and present critiques of communication research articles. As a final project students will be able to present their cumulative understanding of the research process through a group project. In groups, students will design a study that employs one of the major methodologies discussed in this class (i.e. experiments, survey, content analyses etc.). The groups will formulate a research question/hypothesis, develop an instrument for data collection, collect data, analyze data, and present the results in a poster presentation at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: MATH 0001.


COMMRC 1107 GENDER AND COMMUNICATION
3 cr.

In-depth exploration of the communication of women and men in society in such settings as families, friendships, schools, organizations, and media. Prerequisite: COMMRC 0030.


COMMRC 1124 RHETORICAL CRITICISM
3 cr.

Designed to help students become acquainted with contemporary methods of rhetorical criticism through a combination of lecture, discussion, and practical applications. Prerequisite: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006.


COMMRC 1130 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING
3 cr.

A speaking course focusing on researching, developing, and delivering presentations appropriate for business contexts. Prerequisite: COMMRC 0030.


COMMRC 1131 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
An overview of the relationship between communication and organizing processes, with an emphasis on theories, principles, and practices of organizational communication as well as organizational research methodology.

COMMRC 1132 POLITICAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
Analysis of methods of symbol use in the political arena and in public policy debates.

COMMRC 1134 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION
3 cr.

Examination of communication principles, theories, and behaviors relevant to small-group formation, dynamics, and decision making.


COMMRC 1136 NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
Examination of nonverbal communication channels including physical characteristics and movements of communicators, as well as spatial and environmental influences on the communication process.

COMMRC 1139 MEDIA CRITICISM
3 cr.
Advanced analysis of the messages, formats, and implications of media texts, applying various theories of contemporary media criticism. Prerequisites: ENGCMP 0004 or ENGCMP 0006, and COMMRC 0320.   

COMMRC 1733 SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
Examines a specific communication topic, which varies each time this course is offered. Permission of instructor may replace COMMRC 0030 as prerequisite. Junior or senior status is strongly recommended for this course. Prerequisite: COMMRC 0030.

COMMRC 1902 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–6 cr.
An independent program of study, research, or creative activity conducted under specific, prearranged conditions between the student and supervising faculty member.

COMMRC 1903 COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP
1–12 cr.
Internships provide practical work experience related to the student's course of study. Students are placed in community agencies, offices, etc., for training and experience in communication applications.

COMMRC 1950 COMMUNICATION CAPSTONE
3 cr.
This course focuses on research in communication. After a brief introduction of basic concepts, selected methodologies will be examined. Students will engage in individual research projects, utilizing one of these methodologies. Students will submit a written report as well as give a public oral presentation of their original research.

 

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

 

CPET 1178
3 cr.

Introduction and overview Computer Network, data transmission techniques, ISO Open System Interconnection model, switching techniques and protocols such as CSMA, token ring, etc., Application Layer and Network Applications, Transport Layer, Network Layer and Routing, Link Layer and LAN, Wireless and Mobile Networks, Computer Networking in Practice, Network analysis techniques, Queuing systems, throughput delay analysis, and network management. Prerequisites:  ET 0031 and EET 1161.

 

CPET 1078 COMPUTER NETWORKS LABORATORY
1 cr.
Lab will accompany Computer Networks.

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CS)

 

CS 0015 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAM (QR)
3 cr.
This course is primarily intended for business majors who wish to become familiar with microcomputer applications in business. Visual Basic programming is presented as a vehicle for the development of computer-based problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: MATH 0001; CREQ: CS 0016.

CS 0016 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMMING APPLICATIONS
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Introduction to Computer Programming. Corequisite: CS 0015.

CS 0045 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION STRUCTURES APPLICATIONS
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Introduction to Information Structures. Corequisite: CS 0455.

CS 0046 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE APPLICATIONS
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Computer Systems Architecture. Corequisite: CS 0456.

CS 0047 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS LABORATORY
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Advanced Programming Concepts. Corequisite: CS 0457.

CS 0048 DATA STRUCTURES AND FILES APPLICATIONS
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Data Structures and Files. Corequisite: CS 0458.

CS 0081 COMPUTER LITERACY
3 cr.
A survey course designed for students not majoring in computer science. Provides an overview of the components of a computer system, including hardware, operating systems, and application software. Includes coverage of processing fundamentals; storage, input/output, and networking technologies; and Internet fundamentals. Lab sessions provide a hands-on introduction to office productivity software including word processing, spreadsheets, micro databases, and presentation graphics, as well as an introduction to Web Page creation using HTML and Frontpage.

CS 0082 COMPUTER SCIENCE ASSISTANTSHIP—NONMAJORS
1–3 cr.
This course is designed to accommodate students who are not computer science majors who wish to participate in laboratory consulting, teaching projects, and other meaningful CS activities on campus.

CS 0100 PERSPECTIVES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
3 cr.
This is an entry-level course for computer science majors. It presents an overview of the field for the benefit of those who will be pursuing in-depth studies related to many of the topics presented. These topics will include, among others, considerations of computer hardware and software, problem-solving techniques, elementary data structures, binary data representation, data communications, as well as the history and social implications of computerization.

CS 0406 DISCRETE MATH 2 AND STATISTICS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE
3 cr.
This course is the sequel to Discrete Math 1. Half of the course will be devoted to probability and statistics and include topics in probability, combinatorics, elementary laws of means, variances and standard deviations, expected values, and descriptive statistics. The remainder of the course will be devoted to advanced topics in discrete math and will include proof techniques, induction, quantifiers, recurrence relations, algebraic structures, finite state machines, turning machines, and formal languages. Prerequisite: MATH 0401.

CS 0410 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMMING APPLICATIONS
1 cr.
An application course to accompany Introduction to Computer Science Programming lecture. Prerequisites: CS 0100, MATH 0401. Corequisite: CS 0411.

CS 0411 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAMMING
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the concepts, techniques, and tools of computer science. It is designed for those students who are intending to major in that discipline. The course is to emphasize fundamental approaches to problem analysis, algorithm development, and top-down program design. The student is to gain a thorough working knowledge of an exemplary programming language and to become thoroughly familiar with the Pitt computing environment. Students must have completed two years of high school mathematics. Prerequisites: CS 0100, MATH 0401. Corequisite: CS 0410.

CS 0417 INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING USING JAVA
3 cr.
This intermediate programming course for non-CS majors will emphasize object-oriented design and programming. Object-oriented concepts such as data encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism will be explored and implemented by students using predefined classes and by creating their own classes. Graphical user interfaces and event handling will also be covered. The programming language that will serve as the basis for this course will be Java. Prerequisites:CS 0410 and 0411, or CS 0015 and 0016, or ET 0031, or permission of instructor.

CS 0455 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION STRUCTURES
3 cr.
This course will emphasize the study of the basic data structures of computer science—stacks, queues, trees, lists, and graphs and their implementation using a structured language. In addition, various mathematical structures introduced in Discrete Mathematical Structures will be applied to computer science problems. PREQ: CS 0410 and 0411 and (CS 0406 or MATH 1012); CREQ: CS 0045.

CS 0456 COMPUTER SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE
3 cr.
Emphasis is on providing the student with a basic exposure to the UNIX operating system and computer architecture with Assembly language programming. Also, the nonobject-oriented features of the C++ programming language are presented. PREQ: CS 0410 and 0411 and (CS 0406 or MATH 1012); CREQ: CS 0046.

CS 0457 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
3 cr.
Emphasis will be placed on the advanced features of C++ including stream I/O, object-orientation with classes, generic programming units, and exception handling. The underlying principles of object-oriented design, namely inheritance and polymorphism, will be explored in depth. Prerequisites: CS 0455, CS 0045, CS 0456, CS 0046. Corequisite: CS 0047.

CS 0458 DATA STRUCTURES AND FILES
3 cr.
A study of computer representations of structured data both in main memory and on secondary storage devices as well as operations on such data. Topics include list structures, various advanced data structures, hashing, file structures, and access methods. Interaction between main and secondary storage, sorting, and searching also will be covered. Prerequisites: CS 0455, CS 0045, CS 0456, CS 0046. Corequisite: CS 0048.

CS 1132 CLASSICAL NUMERICAL ANALYSIS
3 cr.

Numerical methods for solving mathematical problems on computers. Topics include computer arithmetic, error propagation, solutions to linear equation, interpolation and approximation, numerical differentiation, solutions to nonlinear equations, and solutions to ordinary and partial differential equations. PREQ: CS 0410 and 0411 and (CS 0406 or MATH 1012); CREQ: CS 0046.


CS 1162 TOPICS IN COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
3 cr.

Current topics in computer applications are discussed, such as networks, robotics, new languages, personal computers, software systems, list processing, or any area of recent concern. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.


CS 1163 ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
3 cr.
Topics that are extensions of upper-level CS electives are discussed. The content of this course is in general more advanced, and the topics are more rigorous than for Topics in Computer Applications. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.  

CS 1164 ADVANCED COMPUTER SCIENCE TOPICS AND APPLICATIONS
3 cr.
Topics that are extensions of upper-level CS electives are discussed. The content of this course is in general more advanced, and the topics are more rigorous than for Topics in Computer Applications. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1165 DIRECTED PROJECT
3 cr.
Participants in a group will implement a useful software system based on the design conceived in Software Engineering. Participants will produce a deliverable product including all written associated documentation describing the product and its results. Group presentations will be included in this course. Prerequisite: CS 1735. Corequisite: CS 1736.

CS 1171 COMPUTER SCIENCE ASSISTANTSHIP
1–3 cr.
This course is designed to accommodate students who wish to participate in laboratory consulting, teaching projects, and software systems implementations not associated with any other meaningful computer science-related activities on campus.

CS 1550 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING
3 cr.
An introduction to basic concepts of operating systems, common to most computer systems, that interface the machine with upper-level programs. This course will introduce processes such as processing unit, process management, concurrency, communication, memory management and protection, and file systems.

CS 1710 FORMAL STRUCTURES COMPUTER SCIENCE
3 cr.
This course will provide a detailed exposition of abstract mathematical structures relevant to computer science. Abstraction is emphasized as a powerful tool for solving problems, and the student is exposed to a variety of proof techniques. Applications of abstraction to approach practical problems in computer science are emphasized. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1712 BOOLEAN ALGEBRA AND COMPUTER LOGIC
3 cr.

This course is intended to introduce the student to the basic ideas of computer elements and logical design techniques, and to the principles of computer hardware organization. The course presupposes no background in electronics or engineering, stresses logical rather than physical aspects. Topics covered include Boolean algebra and its application to logical design, logic circuits, computer arithmetic, functional units of digital computer, and basic computer organization.


CS 1713 ALGORITHM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS
3 cr.
This course will introduce topics related to the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include 0-notation, recurrence relations, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, graph algorithms, advanced data structures, and completeness algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1720 PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
3 cr.
Several programming languages will be studied from a programming (rather than an implementation) point of view. The study of diverse programming languages will exemplify differing approaches to concepts such as scope of declaration, storage allocation, data structure variety, binding times, and control structures. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1735 SOFTWARE DESIGN METHODOLOGY
3 cr.
Construction of large computerized systems proceeds through the stages of requirements analysis, specification, and implementation. This course deals with requirements analysis and specification. Emphasis is on methodologies for improving the reliability of specifications, i.e., on executable specifications and systems prototypes. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1736 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
3 cr.

Software engineering is a team discipline. The purpose of this course is to introduce the principles of software engineering and to provide experience in teamwork. The course is structured around a major project, which is taken through the stages of cost estimation, requirements specification, design and implementation, and testing. Prerequisite: CS 1735. Corequisite: CS 1165.


CS 1742 INTRODUCTION TO SIMULATION
3 cr.

This course is to introduce students to the concepts, definitions, and techniques which are applicable to the modeling and simulation of systems; both continuous and discrete system simulation methods are covered. Topics include: system characterization, classification and modeling, pertinence of concepts from probability and statistics, and introductory description of suitable programming languages.


CS 1750 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING
3 cr.

This course is an introduction to the design and implementation of system software. Topics include hardware-software interface (architecture), various types of input/output programming, interrupt and trap, buffers and concurrent input/output, assembler, linker/loader, editor, and introduction to operating systems. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.


CS 1760 ADVANCED OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN
3 cr.
This upper-level course consists of examining high-level aspects of the Object-Oriented Programming paradigm. This examination includes both the theoretical and the practical aspects as well as current programming practices. The course will also involve studying a particular object-oriented language or languages. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458 or permission of instructor.

CS 1762 WEB PROGRAMMING
3 cr.
This upper-level course consists of web application programming. Emphasis will be given to modern web programming languages in order to develop dynamic web-database applications. Topics will include client-side scripting, server-side programming, introduction to databases, and web application security. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458 or permission of instructor.

CS 1765 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
3 cr.
The objective of this course is to provide an in-depth knowledge of database systems designs. Thus, the emphasis is on how to model data and use available database management systems (DBMS) effectively. Toward this end, relational structure is discussed in great detail, and hierarchical and network data structures are also presented. Object-oriented database technology is also discussed. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1766 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS
3 cr.
The basic concepts, tools, and techniques of computer graphics are described, and the fundamental transformations of scaling, translation, rotation, windowing, and clipping are presented. Particular emphasis will be placed on new development in microcomputer graphics. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.

CS 1783 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PROGRAMMING
3 cr.
The course discusses the data structures, control structures, and paradigms of artificial intelligence programming. Topics include abstract data types, knowledge structuring recursive programming, discrimination nets, agenda control, deductive information retrieval, slotfiller databases, sophisticated data dependencies, closure-based programs, and expert systems. Several application areas are discussed. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.        

CS 1791 COMPILER DESIGN
3 cr.

This course will introduce the basic concepts of compiler design and implementation. Topics include lexical analysis, various types of parsers, intermediate and object code generation, and code optimization. The material will be presented from an implementation point of view rather than a formal approach. The impact of language design on compilers will also be examined. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.       


CS 1792 COMPUTER OPERATING SYSTEMS
3 cr.

Examination of computer architecture and hardware system organization. Topics include central processing unit (CPU) organization, sequential and microprogrammed control, instruction set implementation, memory organization, input/output structure, peripherals and interfacing, and computer communications. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.       


CS 1793 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE AND ORGANIZATION
3 cr.

Examination of computer architecture and hardware system organization. Topics include central processing unit (CPU) organization, sequential and microprogrammed control, instruction set implementation, memory organization, input/output structure, peripherals and interfacing, and computer communications. Prerequisites: CS 0047, CS 0048, CS 0457, CS 0458.       


CS 1794 INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTING
3 cr.

An examination of the basic principles of operating system design and implementation, topics will include: architecture of computer systems, concurrency, resource management, file systems, security, performance measurement, and evaluation. PREQ: CS 0047 and 0048 and 0457 and 0458.


CS 1903 INTERNSHIP
1–3 cr.
This course places the student in an on-the-job setting in which he or she receives practical experience in a supervised training environment.

CS 1904 DIRECTED STUDY
1–3 cr.
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to design a plan of study to be agreed upon by the student and a supervising faculty member.

CS 1905 INDEPENDENT STUDY
1–15 cr.
Students participate in a computer-oriented project at an outside computer facility.  The project should represent a significant intellectual or creative experience in computer science. Closely supervised activities consisting of consulting, program preparation and modification, design, etc., are required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
   
   
JOHNSTOWN BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 

 

 Home | Top of Page > | Revised 8/22/07 11:33 AM Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us