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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Baccalaureate Programs

 

Students at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg may choose from 25 baccalaureate degree programs. Descriptions for each major may be found in later sections of this publication.

 

 

 

American Studies
Anthropology
Applied Mathematics
Biological Sciences
Chemistry

Communication: Rhetoric and Communication

Creative and Professional Writing

Criminal Justice
Education - Early Childhood (Pre K-4)
Education - Secondary (7-12)

English Literature
History
Humanities Area
Information Science*
Management
Management/Accounting
Management Information Systems

Mathmatics (Applied)
Natural Sciences Area
Political Science
Psychology

Public Policy
Self‑Designed Major
Social Sciences Area
Spanish

Visual and Performing Arts

*The Information Science major is offered at Pitt-Greensburg through a cooperative agreement with University of Pittsburgh’s School of Information Sciences in Pittsburgh. Consult the Information Science section for more details.

.

 

Certificate Programs

 

Certificate programs offer official recognition for students who complete a set of courses in specialized areas. Pitt-Greensburg currently offers certificates in two areas. Details on each are provided in a later section of this publication.

Children’s Literature
Latin American Studies

Manufacturing Management

Minors

Students at the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg may choose from 19 minors. Descriptions for each minor may be found in later sections of this publication.

Accounting
Actuarial Sciences
Chemistry
Computer Science
Education
English Literature
English Writing
Environmental Science
Gender Studies
History
History of Art and Architecture
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Statistics
Theatre

 

Relocation Options

In addition to its own baccalaureate programs, Pitt-Greensburg offers opportunities for students to complete one or two years of work on degrees in selected programs in the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Pharmacy, and School of Social Work. Options for transfer to the College of Business Administration and the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences on the Pittsburgh campus and other regional campuses are also available. The courses, number of credits, and grade point average (GPA) required for relocation vary by program. See the following sections for details.

Engineering

 

Engineering students complete the freshmen engineering curriculum at Greensburg and then relocate to either the Swanson School of Engineering (Pittsburgh campus) or the Engineering Technology Program (Johnstown campus). To be eligible for relocation to the Swanson School of Engineering, students must meet the following criteria: (1) the presentation of a satisfactory high school record with respect to selection of courses and test results. (2) Completion of 34 credits at Pitt-Greensburg with a minimum GPA 2.75 except for bioengineering students who must have a minimum GPA of 3.50. (3) Completion of all first-year engineering courses listed below with grades of C or better:

Required Courses

MATH 0220, 0230 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 and 2
CHEM 0110, 0120 General Chemistry 1 and 2
PHYS 0174, 0175 Basic Physical Science and Engineering 1 and 2
ENGR 0015 Engineering Analysis
ENGR 0016 Introduction to Engineering Computing
ENGR 0081, 0082 Engineering Freshman Seminar 1 and 2

ENGCMP 0010

ENGCMP 0020

6 credits

 

In recognition of the transitional nature of the first year at the University, the Swanson School of Engineering permits a new freshman student to repeat required courses of the freshman year in which D or F grades were received. These courses must be repeated within one academic year following the original registration. Original credits and grade points from these courses will not be used in the calculation of the student's cumulative grade point average. This applies only to freshman courses taken during the first calendar year of attendance as a new freshman student. This does not apply to transfer students.

In order to complete the freshmen engineering curriculum in two semesters, students must be eligible to take Calculus in the first semester. Engineering students who do not place into Calculus should consider taking prerequisite math classes during the summer or plan to spend an extra semester or two at Pitt-Greensburg before relocating.

 

School of Health and Rehabilitation Science

 

Students interested in athletic training, clinical dietetics and nutrition, communication science and disorders, emergency medicine, health information management, and rehabilitation science should complete two years of study at Pitt-Greensburg before relocating to the Pittsburgh campus. The above programs are junior-senior programs that admit students after they have successfully completed 60 credits. As part of the relocation process, students must apply on a competitive basis for admission to the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences.

The required courses during the first two years differ for each of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences majors, but typically include courses in biology, chemistry, statistics, and psychology as well as general education courses in composition, mathematics, and public speaking. See the lists below for details.

Students will be expected to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.50 and earn at least a C- in all required courses unless otherwise noted. Interested students should consult with their academic advisors during the first semester at Greensburg about course selection and relocation procedures. Information on School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences majors may also be found at www.shrs.pitt.edu.

Athletic Training
Students typically spend two years at Pitt-Greensburg and then apply directly to the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences during their final semester at Greensburg. Required prerequisite courses are listed below and must be completed with a C or better. EMT 1101 and REHSCI 1811/1812 are not offered at Greensburg, but students may be able to cross register for these classes on the Pittsburgh campus or for equivalent classes at Westmoreland County Community College or at the Community College of Allegheny County. Students should have completed REHSCI 1811/1812 with a B or better before they apply to the athletic training program.

Required Courses

BIOSC 0170, 0070 Foundations of Biology 1 and Lab
CHEM 0110 General Chemistry 1 and Lab
PHYS 0110 Introduction to Physics 1
MATH 0031 Algebra
STAT 0200 Basic Applied Statistics
PSY 0010 Introduction to Psychology
PSY 0310 Developmental Psychology
ENGCMP 0010, 0020 English Composition 1, 2
CS 0085 PC Software for Business
COMMRC 0520 Public Speaking
EMT 1102 Emergency Medical Technician and Lab
REHSCI 1811/1812 Basic Athletic Training and Lab
Humanities and/or Social Science elective 6 credits

Students must also meet the following requirements: 

(1) Successful completion of at least 60 credits of coursework prior to admission.

(2) 45 clinical observation hours under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer at the University of Pittsburgh. These hours are made available to students who are registered for Basic Athletic Training.

(3) 20 hours of observation outside of the University of Pittsburgh and under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer. The twenty hours must be distributed evenly between a high school facility and a sports medicine clinic.

Applicants should complete an admissions application including the Technical Standards for Admission document.

Application Deadline: March 15

Clinical Dietetics and Nutrition
Students typically spend two years at Pitt-Greensburg and apply directly to the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences during the final semester at Greensburg. Recommended courses are listed below. To satisfy the requirement for a nutrition course, students may cross register for an equivalent course at Westmoreland County Community College or Seton Hill University. In addition, Greensburg students are often permitted to take Introduction to Nutrition after they relocate to the Pittsburgh campus.

Required Courses

BIOSC 0170, 0070 Foundations of Biology 1 and Lab
BIOSC 0180, 0080 Foundations of Biology 2 and lab
CHEM 0110, 0120 General Chemistry with Lab
CHEM 0310, 0320* Organic Chemistry 1 and 2
ECON 0100 or 0110 Introductory Microeconomic or Macroeconomic Theory
COMMRC 0520 Public Speaking
MATH 0031 Algebra
STAT 1000 Introduction to Applied Statistics
PSY 0010 Introduction to Psychology
SOC 0010 Introduction to Sociology
Computer Science Elective (3 credits)
CDN 1006 Introduction to Human Nutrition
English Composition (0010 and 0020) two courses (6 credits), dependent on placement
Introduction to Dietetics ** (1 credit)

* CHEM 350 (3 cr.) offered each spring term on the Oakland campus will satisfy the Organic Chemistry requirement. Students who do not take CHEM 0350 must take OCHEM 1 & 2 (6 credits)

** Provisions will be made for transfer students to take this course during the Fall term of the Junior year, after admission to the program.

Application Deadline: March 15

Apply online: www.shrs.pitt.edu/Apply

Communication Science
Students apply for admission to the communication science program after the successful completion of the 60 required general education credits. It is not necessary to complete all courses listed below prior to application to the major, but it is advisable to include as many of these courses as possible in the 60 required credits. Any outstanding general education courses can be completed while enrolled in SHRS. Application should be made after completion of approximately 45 credits.

Recommended Courses

English Composition
6 credits
 
(3 credits if students placed in ENGCMP 0020)
"W" Writing Courses
4-6 credits
Foreign Language*
minimum 6 credits (if not exempt)
MATH 0031
3 credits
Statistics
4 credits
British or American Literature
3-6 credits
Music or Art
3-6 credits
History
3 credits
Social Science
3 credits
Second Social Science or History
3 credits
Philosophy of Science
3 credits
Natural Science (including Psychology)
9 credits
International Culture
6 credits
Non-Western Culture
3 credits

 


*Satisfied by 3 years of high school second language.

Application Deadline: Rolling Admission.-

Emergency Medicine
Students are admitted into the Emergency Medicine program after successful completion of a minimum of 60 college credits, including the following prerequisite courses:

Required Courses

ENGCMP 0010 or ENGCMP 0020
  3 credits
COMMRC 0520 (Public Speaking) 
3 credits
Math/Statistics/Computer Science
3 credits
Natural Sciences/Psychology
   6 credits
EMT with Lab
    4 credits
Humanities/Social Sciences
   6 credits
(Anthropology, Economics, English
Literature/Writing, Foreign Language,
History, Music, Performing and Visual
Arts, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology,etc.)
Additional Coursework
35 credits

 

Recommended Courses
Anatomy and Physiology
Pharmacology
Introduction to Nutrition
Developmental Psychology
Biology(with lab)*
General Chemistry (with lab)*
Organic Chemistry (with lab)*
Physics (with lab)*


* Indicates recommended Pre-Med/PA courses –minimum one year each.

Application Deadline: Rolling Admissions

Health Information Management
Students are admitted into the Health Information Management Program after the successful completion of a minimum of 60 credits including the following prerequisite courses:

Prerequisite Courses

BIOSC 0170 Foundations of Biology 1
3 credits
CHEM 0110 General Chemistry 1 and Lab
4 credits
COMMRC 0520

Public Speaking

3 credits
Information or Computer Science (must include 3 credits of programming coursework)
9 credits
ENGCMP 0010, 0020 English Composition 1, 2
6 credits
MATH 0031 Algebra
3 credits
PSY 0010 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
STAT 1000 Introduction to Applied Statistics
4 credits
Humanities and/or Social Science elective  
6 credits


Other Admissions Criteria:
Volunteer or paid work experience in Health Information Management (recommended, not required)

Application Deadline: Rolling Admissions


Rehabilitation Science
Students typically earn 60 credits at Pitt-Greensburg and apply directly to the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences during the final semester at Greensburg. Recommended prerequisite courses include the following:

Recommended Courses

BIOSC 0170, 0070 Foundations of Biology 1 and Lab
4 credits
CHEM 0110 General Chemistry 1 and Lab
4 credits
PHYS 0110 Introduction to Physics 1
3 credits
MATH 0031 Algebra
3 credits
STAT 1131 Introduction to Applied Statistics
4 credits
PSY 0010 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
PSY 0310  
3 credits
Composition/Writing* two courses
6 credits
Computer Science one course
3-4 credits
Humanities and/or Social Science elective  
6 credits

Total Prerequisites 37-40 credits

* Minimum Requirement ENGCMP 0020; Research Writing recommended.

Note: Students planning to apply to graduate programs in the health sciences are encouraged to complete most of the prerequisite courses (e.g. PHYS 0111, PHYS 0212, BIOSC 0180, BIOSC 0080, CHEM 0120, etc.) prior to admission. Anatomy and Physiology, a prerequisite for many professional health science programs, is included in the Rehabilitation Science curriculum.

Application Deadline: February 15

School of Pharmacy

The pharmacy program at the University of Pittsburgh is a six-year program leading to a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD). After two years of pre-pharmacy courses at Pitt-Greensburg, pharmacy students continue for four additional years in the School of Pharmacy (Pittsburgh campus). Students who qualify based on SAT scores and high school grades at the time they are admitted to Pitt-Greensburg are guaranteed admission to the School of Pharmacy as long as they maintain a GPA of 3.25 in required math and science courses and an overall GPA of 3.25. Those who are not guaranteed admission to the School of Pharmacy at the time they are admitted to Greensburg may still follow the pre-pharmacy curriculum and then apply for admission on a competitive basis. The following pre-pharmacy courses should be taken at Greensburg:

Required Courses

BIOSC 0170, 0070 Foundations of Biology 1 and Lab
BIOSC 0180, 0080 Foundations of Biology 2 and Lab
CHEM 0110, 0120 General Chemistry 1 and 2 and Labs
CHEM 0310, 0330 Organic Chemistry 1 and Lab
CHEM 0320, 0340 Organic Chemistry 2 and Lab
MATH 0120 or 0220 Business Calculus or Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
ECON 0100 or ECON 0110 Introductory Microeconomic Theory/Introduction to Macroeconomic Theory
ENGCMP two courses
PSY 0010 Introduction to Psychology
STAT 1000 or 0200 Introduction to Applied Statistics/Basic Applied Statistics
Humanities two courses (at least 6 credits) from two different
Social Sciences two courses (at least 6 credits) from two different departments
Electives 6 additional credits in Humanities, Social Sciences, or Psychology
COMMRC 0520 Public Speaking (recommended)

 

In addition pre-pharmacy students must (1) Maintain a 3.0 in all science courses. (2) Maintain a C or better in all other courses. (3) Complete a pre-admissions interview with the Office of Admissions at the School of Pharmacy. (4) Have a PCAT score in the 70th percentile or higher. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, Pass/Fail courses will not qualify. CLEP, distance learning, online, or foreign courses will not qualify.

Note: Course repetitions are highly discouraged

School of Social Work

Students interested in social work must complete 60 credits at Pitt-Greensburg with a minimum GPA of 2.50 and then relocate to the School of Social Work (Pittsburgh campus). Students must also apply for admission to the School of Social Work during the final semester at Greensburg. Social work students should take a minimum of nine credits in humanities, nine credits in social sciences, nine credits in natural sciences, and 33 additional credits most of which should be in social sciences.

Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences (Pittsburgh campus) and the College of General Studies (Pittsburgh campus)

The following rules govern relocation to the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences and the College of General Studies.

1.  For students who are initially enrolled on the Pitt-Greensburg campus, relocation is guaranteed if they meet the following requirements:

  • Completion of a minimum of 60 credits at Pitt-Greensburg, with a minimum GPA of 3.0

2. For students who have transferred from another institution of higher learning with at least 30  transfer credits to Pitt-Greensburg, relocation is guaranteed if they meet the following requirements:

  • Completion of 30 credits at Pitt-Greensburg and a total of 60 credits overall, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all courses (Pitt-Greensburg and other institutions of higher learning)

3. Students who have transferred from another institution of higher learning and have earned between 15 and 30 credits at Pitt-Greensburg may be considered for relocation (not guaranteed) if they meet the following requirements:

  • Completion of 60 credits overall with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all courses (Pitt-Greensburg and other institutions of higher learning)

Note: Students in each of the three categories listed above must also (1) declare a major at the time of the requested relocation, (2) complete College Algebra or higher and English Composition 2, and (3) include the appropriate Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements and the appropriate pre-requisites for that major among the credits transferring.


College of Business Administration (Pittsburgh campus)

Students will be eligible to relocate to the College of Business Administration by fulfilling the following requirements: (1) Completion of at least 30 credits at Pitt-Greensburg with a minimum GPA of 3.0. (2) Completion of the general education courses appropriate for the College of Business Administration (see academic advisor for details). (3) Completion of required courses as listed in the table below with a minimum GPA of 3.0:

Required Courses

ECON 0100 Intro to Microeconomic Theory
ECON 0110 Intro to Macroeconomic Theory
MATH 0120 Business Calculus
STAT 1100 Statistics and Probability for Business Management

 

University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown and Bradford

Students may also relocate to another regional campus. A minimum GPA of 2.00 and 24 credits is required for relocation. The specific courses that students should take at Pitt-Greensburg will depend on the intended major at the regional campus they are interested in relocating to. Please see your academic advisor to fill out relocation papers.

Pitt-Greensburg Degree Requirements

To earn a Pitt-Greensburg degree, students must complete between 120 and 126 credits of college work with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0. As part of their 120–126 credits for graduation, students must include specific skills and general education courses and the courses required for their chosen majors. See the following section for the details about skill and general education requirements and the program descriptions for the details about particular Pitt-Greensburg majors and other programs.

Skills and General Education

The following skills and general education requirements apply to all Pitt-Greensburg degree programs except Information Science and relocation programs. Consult the relocation options section and the Information Science section in this publication for details on skill and general education requirements for those programs.

 

Competencies*

 

ENGCMP 0010   College Composition 1
ENGCMP 0020  College Composition 2
ENGCMP 0030   College Composition 3 or
W Course  Discipline-based course with a substantial writing component identified by a W in the Schedule of Classes
COMMRC 0520 Public Speaking
MATH 0080   Fundamentals of Modern Math or
MATH 0031   Algebra
   
Foreign Language  

All full-time students are expected to demonstrate competency in a second language by:

  1. completing four years of high-school study in the same language earning C or better grades. Such students are encouraged to continue their study of languages, but it will not be required as part of general education to enroll in any additional language classes.
  2. completing the three-course sequence totaling nine credits in Spanish (SPAN 0041, 0042 and 0043), French (FR 0041, 0042 and 0043) or German (GER 0041, 0042 and 0043). A two-course, ten credit sequence is also available in Chinese (CHIN 0021 and 0022). Based on the number of years and recency of successful language study in high school and on the results of placement testing, students may be allowed to skip the first or second course in the beginning-level  language sequence. For example, a student who completed a third year of Spanish as a high-school senior might be able to satisfy the requirement by completing SP 0043. On the other hand, a student who finished two years of French as a sophomore would most likely need to complete the entire three-semester sequence.

*All English composition, communications, and mathematics courses used to satisfy the competency requirements must be completed with a grade of C– or better.

 

Modes of Understanding the World and Our Place in It

Understanding Human Behavior

Students must select one course from among those listed as SS1 in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding American Society

Students must select one course from among those listed as SS2 in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding the Modern World

Students must select one course from among those listed as SS3 in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding the Natural World

Students must complete the two-course sequence listed as NS in the Schedule of Classes or two courses designated as NS1. The new two-course (NS) sequence is interdisciplinary and will be concerned with facets of some common, basic scientific ideas and methods in chemistry, biology, and physics. Depending on the major, students may substitute two approved natural science courses for the interdisciplinary sequence.

Understanding Literary Traditions

Students must select one course from among those listed as LT in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding Artistic Traditions

Students must select one course from among those listed as AT in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding Philosophical Traditions

Students must select one course from among those listed as PT in the Schedule of Classes.

Understanding Foreign Cultures

Students must select one course from among those listed as FC in the Schedule of Classes.

Additional Requirements

In addition to the requirements listed above, all students must complete the following:

  • two additional courses from among those designated as SS, SS1, SS2, or SS3 in the Schedule of Classes;
  • two courses from among those designated HM, LT, AT, or PT;
and
  • Two courses designated as NS1 or NS2 in the Schedule of Classes.

 

ACADEMIC DEGREE PROGRAMS

American Studies
Bachelor of Arts
(36 credits)

The multidisciplinary American studies major is designed for students whose interests in American history, society, and culture cut across departmental and divisional lines.

Core Courses 5 courses (15 credits)
HIST  0600  United States History to 1877
HIST 0601 United States History 1865-Present
PS 0200   American Political Process
ENGLIT 1215  Pre-20th-Century American Literature
ENGLIT 1250 20th-Century American Literature

Area Requirements 6 courses (18 credits)

At least two courses of the six area courses must be chosen from the Social Sciences cluster and two from the American Culture cluster. Representative Social Science and American Culture classes are listed below.

Social Sciences Cluster

ANTH 0780  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1753   North American Indians
ANTH 1787 Spec Topics in Cultural Anthropology
ECON 0110 Introductory Macroeconomic Theory
ECON 0280 Introduction to Money and Banking
HIST 1611 American Revolution 1763-1791
HIST 1620  The Vietnam War
HIST 1661 United States Women 2
PS 0600 Political Theory and Analysis
PS 1202  American Constitutional Law
PS 1212 American Presidency
SOC 0003    Technology and Social Change
SOC 0010   Introduction to Sociology
   

American Culture Cluster

SOC 0010 Introduction to Sociology
COMMRC 1105  Television and Society
COMMRC 1146  Intercultural Communication
ENGLIT 1022   Literature of the American West
ENGLIT 1026 American Poetry
HA&A 0501 American Art: 1750–1950
MUSIC 0800 History of American Popular Music
RELGST 0405 Religion in Early America

Additional Requirements 1 course (3 credits)

 

After earning 90 credits, each American studies major should take ANTH 1955, HIST 1955, PS 1955, or ENGLIT 1950 to fulfill the capstone course requirement.

Recommended Courses

All students majoring in American studies are strongly advised to complete courses in a second language through the intermediate level.

Anthropology
Bachelor of Arts
(42 credits)

Anthropology is concerned with the development and functioning of both historical and contemporary human cultures. While Anthropology majors will learn about human behavior from cultural, physical, and archeological perspectives, they may choose to emphasize either Archeology or cultural Anthropology in their program of studies.

Core Courses 4 courses (12-13 credits)

ANTH 0582  Introduction to Archeology
ANTH 0680  Introduction to Physical Anthropology
ANTH 0780  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1110 Theory of Anthropology (Sociocultural Track) or
ANTH 1534  Archeological Data Recovery and Analysis (Archaeological Track)
   
Electives 5 courses (15 credits)

 

Cultural Anthropology Track

Three courses in Sociocultural Anthropology and two courses in Archeology.

 

Archeology Track

Three courses in Archeology and two courses in Sociocultural Anthropology.

Related Area  4 courses (12 credits)

 

Each student takes four courses from another department such as Biological Sciences, Political Science, Sociology, Economics, History, or Spanish Literature and Culture.

Additional Requirements  1 course (3 credits)

After earning 90 credits, all Anthropology students must take ANTH 1955 (Sociocultural Track) or ANTH 1956 (Archeology Track) to fulfill the capstone class requirement.

 

Recommended Courses

All students, especially those interested in graduate study, are urged to complete courses in a second language through the intermediate level.

 

 

Biological Sciences
 Bachelor of Science
(52 credits)

A Biological Sciences degree prepares students for graduate work in biology as well as for medical, dental or veterinary school.

 

Core Courses 5 courses (13 credits)

BIOSC 0170, 0070 Foundations of Biology 1/Lab
BIOSC 0180, 0080 Foundations of Biology 2/Lab
BIOSC 0350 Genetics

Upper Level Courses (16 credits)*

All students must take either the single-semester Biochemistry or the multi-course Biochemistry sequence and then select additional lecture and lab electives. Students must take a minimum of two lecture/lab combinations. Courses marked with asterisks are recommended for students who are seeking the strongest preparation for graduate and medical, dental, and veterinary school.

BIOSC 1000 

Biochemistry

or
BIOSC 1810 

Macromolecular Structure and Function*  

BIOSC 1820  Metabolic Pathways and Regulation*
BIOSC 1830   

Biochemistry Laboratory*

   

Additional Upper Level Courses

                            
BIOSC 1110 & 1111 Anatomy and Physiology 1 & Lab
BIOSC 1115 & 1116 Anatomy and Physiology 2 & Lab
BIOSC 1200 & 1210 Vertebrate Morphology & Lab
BIOSC 1480 & 1490 Embryology & Lab
BIOSC 1500 & 1510  Cell Biology & Lab
BIOSC 1560 Cell and Developmental Biology Seminars
BIOSC 1580  Biochemistry Seminar
BIOSC 1760 Immunology
BIOSC 1850 & 1860 Microbiology & Lab
BIOSC 1870 & 1875 Animal Physiology & Lab
BIOSC 1940 & 1950  Molecular Biology & Lab

Other Required Courses 9 courses (24 credits)

CHEM 0310 & 0330 Organic Chemistry 1/Lab
CHEM 0320 & 0340 Organic Chemistry 2/Lab
PHYS 0110 Introduction to Physics 1
PHYS 0111 & 0212  Introduction to Physics 2/Lab
MATH 0220  Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
MATH 0230** Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2


**With the consent of the Faculty Advisor, students may substitute STAT 1000-Applied Statistical Methods or a computer programming course (CS 0004-Introduction to Computer Programming with BASIC or CS 0402-Programming Using C++) for MATH 0230. 

 
Additional Requirement 1 course (3 credits)

Biology majors must take the following course to fulfill the capstone course:

 
BIOSC 1962  Biology Undergraduate Research

 


 

Chemistry
Bachelor of Science (61-63 credits)

 

Chemistry is an immensely versatile degree for students who wish to pursue careers in industry, business, communications, government, agricultural and food science, materials science, clinical science and environmental science.  The degree also can lead to opportunities for graduate study in the health-related professions, particularly in the medical and dental fields, and opportunities for graduate study in chemistry, chemical engineering, biology and other sciences.

 

Basic Courses

14 courses (34 credits)

CHEM 0110

General Chemistry 1
CHEM 0120 General Chemistry 2
CHEM 0250, 0260 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry/Lab
CHEM 0310, 0330 Organic Chemistry 1/Lab
CHEM 0320, 0340 Organic Chemistry 2/Lab
CHEM 1130 Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 1250, 1255 Instrumental Analysis/Lab
CHEM 1410, 1430 Physical Chemistry 1/Lab
CHEM 1420 Physical Chemistry 2
   

Basic Math Courses

3 courses (12 credits)

MATH 0220

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1

MATH 0230

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2

MATH 0240

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3

   
Basic Physic Courses 3 courses (10 credits)
PHYS 0174 Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 1
PHYS 0175

Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 2

PHYS 0212 Introduction to Laboratory Physics
   
Science Elective Courses 1 course (2-4 credits)
BIOSC 1000  Biochemistry
BIOSC 1810  Macromolecular Structure and Function
BIOSC 1820 

Metabolic Pathways and Regulation

BIOSC 1830  Biochemistry Laboratory
CHEM 1311 Advance Organic Chemistry
CHEM 1035 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry
CHEM 1380 Techniques of Organic Research
CHEM 1902 Directed/Independent Study
MATH 0250 Ordinary Differential Equations
MATH 1180 Linear Algebra
STAT 1000 Applied Statistical Methods

 

Additional Requirements 2 course (3 credits)

Chemistry majors must take the following sequence of courses to fulfill the capstone course requirement:

 

CHEM 1702

Undergraduate Research Seminar (Spring of Junior Year)

CHEM 1710

Undergraduate Research Seminar (Fall of Senior Year)

 

COMMUNICATION: Rhetoric and Communications
Bachelor of Arts (42 credits)

The study of communication and rhetoric treats human communication as purposeful interaction between speakers and listeners. It takes into account the purpose of the message, the audience, the channels used, and the context in which the communication occurs. As a discipline, communication investigates a broad range of topics and incorporates knowledge acquired from other fields as well, including psychology, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics.

 

Core Courses 

2 courses (6 credits)

 

 

COMMRC 0310

Rhetorical Process

COMMRC 0320

Mass Communication Process

   

Method Courses

1 course (3 credits)

COMMRC 1030

Communication Research Methods

 

 

Area Courses

6 courses (18 credits)

 

Students choose four courses (12 credits) from either Rhetorical Studies or Media Studies as their main area of emphasis and two courses (6 credits) from the other area of emphasis. A partial list of available classes is provided below.

 

 

 

Rhetorical Studies

 

 

 

COMMRC 0005

Interviewing and Information Gathering

COMMRC 0500

Argument

COMMRC 1111

Theories of Persuasion

COMMRC 1127 Image Restoration in the Media

COMMRC 1146

Intercultural Communication

COMMRC 1155 History of Rhetoric in American Advertising
COMMRC 1520 Advanced Public Speaking

 

 

Media Studies

 

 

 

COMMRC 0330

Cultural Studies of Communication

COMMRC 0570

Independent Film

COMMRC 1012 Digital Storytelling 1
COMMRC 1022 Digital Media Studies
COMMRC 1022 Digital Storytelling 2

COMMRC 1035

Visual Rhetoric

COMMRC 1105

Television and Society

COMMRC 1152

Digital Professional Communication

COMMRC 1220

Public Relations: Strategy & Practice

COMMRC 1310 Advertising Strategy & Practice
COMMRC 1410 Film and Propaganda

Related Area

4 courses (12 credits)

   

All Communication majors must select four courses from another discipline within the humanities area or from a discipline outside the humanities as approved by a faculty advisor. Students may also choose a Minor rather than a Related Area which is often a total of 15 credits, depending upon the chosen Minor.

 

   
Additional Requirements 1 course (3 credits)
COMMRC 1950 Communication Capstone (after earning 90 credits and completing COMMRC 1030)

 

 

CREATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING
Bachelor of Arts (51 credits)

Students interested in English Creative and Professional Writing with an emphasis in journalism, fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction complete two basic courses in creative and professional writing, then choose six upper-level courses in the major and four literature courses. Students are encouraged to identify a genre emphasis and complete all courses in that genre (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, journalism). Journalism majors are strongly encouraged to complete a three-credit internship in addition to their required coursework.

REQUIREMENTS:

Complete these two basic courses:

ENGWRT 0410 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGWRT 0550 Fundamentals of News Reporting

 

Complete six additional upper-level Creative and Professional Writing courses.

Students may choose from the following:

 

ENGWRT 1010 Intermediate Fiction

ENGWRT 1012 Digital Storytelling 1

ENGWRT 1095 Topics In Fiction

ENGWRT 1175 Fiction Seminar: Families and Small Towns

ENGWRT 1210 Poetry Workshop

ENGWRT 1250 Formal Poetry Writing

ENGWRT 1290 Readings in Contemporary Poetry

ENGWRT 1310 Newspaper 1

ENGWRT 1331 Magazine 1

ENGWRT 1380 News Practicum – The Insider (3-credit option)

ENGWRT 1390 Readings in Contemporary Nonfiction

ENGWRT 1410 Topics in Nonfiction: Memoir Writing, Food Writing, Nature Writing, or Travel Writing  

ENGWRT 1650 Playwriting

Complete four Literature (ENGLIT) courses.

Complete ENGWRT Capstone course (Senior Year).

(Optional but strongly encouraged, especially for students with Journalism focus) ENGWRT Internship

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Bachelor of Arts (36 credits)

The Criminal Justice major couples a strong liberal arts education with professional classes in criminology, law enforcement, criminal law, and corrections.

 

Core Courses

6 courses (18 credits)

 

 

CJ 0002

Crime, Law, and Public Policy

CJ 0110

Criminology

CJ 0130 

Correctional Philosophy: Theory and Practices

CJ 0210 

American System of Criminal Justice

CJ 1125

History and Philosophy of Law Enforcement

SOCSCI 0200

Research Methods in Social Sciences

 

 

Electives

4 courses (12 credits)

 

 

CJ 0145 

Drugs and Society

CJ 1050

Comparative Criminology

CJ 1110

Violent Crime

CJ 1116 

Organized Crime

CJ 1120

Community Policing and Problem Solving

CJ 1130 

Minority Issues in Criminal Justice

CJ 1148 

Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

CJ 1154

Probation and Parole

CJ 1155 

Critical Issues in Contemporary Law Enforcement

CJ 1230 Critical Issues in Contemporary Corrections

CJ 1248

Women and Crime

CJ 1518

White Collar Crime

CJ 1520

Victimology

 

 

Additional Requirement

2 courses (6 credits)

 

 

After earning 90 credits, all Criminal Justice majors must take CJ 1198 (Internship) or CJ 1199 (Research Practicum) and CJ 1950 to fulfill the capstone course requirement.

 

 

Recommended Classes

 

 

 

CS 0085

PC Software for Business

PSY 0310

Developmental Psychology

PSY 1205  

Abnormal Behavior

SOC 0010

Introduction to Sociology

STAT 1000

Applied Statistical Methods

 

EDUCATION
Bachelor Program
(This program is for students that will be completing courses by April 2012.)

Pitt-Greensburg provides students with the opportunity to earn certification as elementary or secondary teachers through a cooperative program with nearby Saint Vincent College. Education students take the courses required for a major along with selected education courses at Pitt-Greensburg. As seniors, Pitt-Greensburg Education majors will also take a few classes at Saint Vincent College and then complete the course work and student teaching required for certification at Saint Vincent following Pitt-Greensburg graduation. Secondary education students will need two semesters of work at Saint Vincent College following Pitt-Greensburg graduation, while elementary education students will need three semesters.

Note: Anyone wishing to earn the K-6 Elementary Certification must be completely finished with certification in hand by August 31, 2013; thereafter, all students wishing to teach elementary-aged children must have either the Early Childhood Certification (PK-4) or the Intermediate Certification (4-8).

 

Certification Options 

Corresponding UPG Major*

 

 

Secondary Biology

Biological Sciences

Secondary Citizenship   

History or Political Science

Secondary English 

English Literature or English Writing

Secondary Mathematics

Applied Mathematics

Elementary

Psychology

Other majors are possible based on student's interest.

 

 

*Certification requirements may affect a student’s choice of courses within a major. Consult an education advisor for details about specific course selection in a major related to certification.

 

Requirements

 

 

 

PSY 0010

Introduction to Psychology

PSY 0310

Developmental Psychology

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom

I&L 1330

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction

 

 

I&L 1700 

Early Field Experience—Elementary or

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience—Secondary

 

 

Elementary Education

 

 

 

ELED 1160

Teaching of Social Studies in Elementary School

I&L 1473  

Math for Elementary Teachers

 

 

Courses to Be Taken at Saint Vincent College

 

 

 

Secondary Education

 

ED 200 

Secondary Reading Instruction

ED 30[1–4] 

Teaching of [English, Citizenship, Math, or Science]

ED 400 

Field Experience II—Pre-Student Teaching

ED 410

Field Experience III—Student Teaching

ED 411  

Professional Seminar

One additional course related to major (e.g., Geography)

 

 

 

Elementary Education

 

ED 109 

Physical and Cultural Geography

ED 242 

Teaching of Mathematics, N-6

ED 244

Teaching of Health and Science, N-6

ED 250 

Reading and Language Arts, N-3

ED 308

Teaching of Fine Arts, N-6

ED 320

Reading and Languages Arts, 4-6

ED 400 

Field Experience II—Pre-Student Teaching

ED 410

Field Experience III – Student Teaching

ED 411

Professional Seminar

 

EDUCATION - EARLY CHILDHOOD (PRE K-4)
Bachelor of Science (67 credits)
Teaching Certificate

Teacher candidates wishing to teach preschool and early elementary grades (through fourth grade) choose this education track.

Classes focus on:

  • Pedagogy, assessment, and management of students;
  • Subject matter content (including reading, writing, math, social studies, science and fine arts) for Pre K-4 students;
  • Childhood development and familial interactions.

Course Sequence Maps

Early Childhood Education
            8 semester sequence map

Early Childhood Education/Behavior Analysis
            9 semester sequence map
            9 semester sequence map/summer classes

Early Childhood Education/Children’s Literature
            9 semester sequence map
            9 semester sequence map/summer classes

Early Childhood Education/Psychology Minor
            9 semester sequence map
            9 semester sequence map/summer classes

 

Core Course Requirements

 

PSY 0310

Developmental Psychology

PSY 1001

Introduction to Educational Psychology

ADMPS 1001

 

Social Foundations of Education

 

 

 

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I & L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I & L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I & L 1150

Health Education in the Primary Years:  Issues and Strategies

I & L 1161

Social Studies in the Primary Years

I & L 1210

Emergent Literacy

I & L 1215

Reading in the Primary Years

I & L 1218

Assessment in Education

I & L 1220

Language Arts in the Primary Years

I & L 1222

Mathematics in the Primary Years

I & L 1225

Pedagogy Lab – Literacy and Mathematics

I & L 1275

Integrating the Creative Arts

I & L 1324

Engaging Young Children in Learning

I & L 1330

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction -  Early Childhood

I & L 1410

School-Family-Community Collaboration

I & L 1420

Science in the Primary Years

I & L 1700

Early Field Experience-Elem

I & L 1810

Pre-Student Teaching - Early Childhood

I & L 1820

Student Teaching - Early Childhood

I & L 1875

Student Teaching Seminar – Early Childhood

I & L 0020

Directed Tutoring – Optional

 

EDUCATION - SECONDARY (7-12)
Bachelor of Science
Teaching Certificate

 

Teacher candidates wishing to teach middle school and high school choose this education track.  Secondary candidates can opt to earn a dual major by completing additional classes in their content area during additional semesters.

Classes focus on:

  • Pedagogy, assessment, and management of students;
  • Teaching diverse students;
  • In-depth content knowledge in a chosen discipline.

Teacher candidates can choose from the following program content areas:  Biology, Chemistry, English (Literature or Writing focus), Mathematics, or Social Studies (History or Political Science focus).  Teacher candidates choosing to stay for one extra semester (or two in the case of Biology) can earn a dual major in both Secondary Education and in their discipline areas (e.g., Secondary Education in Mathematics AND in Applied Mathematics).

Secondary Education – Concentrations

Secondary Education – Biology
            8  semester sequence map
            10 semester sequence map

 

Core Course Requirements

 

BIOSC 0170, 0070

Foundation of Biology 1/Lab 1

BIOSC 0180, 0080

Foundation of Biology 2/Lab 2

BIOSC 0350

Genetics

BIOSC 1385

Ecology and Environment

BIOSC 1110, 1111

Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab

BIOSC 1500, 1510

Cell Biology/Lab

NATSC 0075

Earth and Space Science

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

PEDC 0310

Health Science

 

 

Biology Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1332

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction – Secondary

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience – Secondary

I&L 1442

Teaching Lab Science

I&L 1440

Teaching Science – Secondary

I&L 1441

Pedagogy Lab – Science

I&L 1811

Pre-Student Teaching – Secondary

I&L 1876

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1821

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

 

Secondary Education – Chemistry

 

 

Eight semester sequence map

 

Nine semester sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

CHEM 0110

General Chemistry 1

CHEM 0120

General Chemistry 2

CHEM 0310/0330

Organic Chemistry 1/Lab

CHEM 0320/0340

Organic Chemistry 2/Lab

CHEM 0250/0260

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry/Lab

CHEM 1410

Physical Chemistry 1

CHEM 1035

Environmental Chemistry

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

PEDC 0310

Health Science

PHYS 0212

Introduction to Laboratory Physics

 

 

Chemistry Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1332

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction – Secondary

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience – Secondary

I&L 1442

Teaching Lab Science

I&L 1440

Teaching Science – Secondary

I&L 1441

Pedagogy Lab – Science

I&L 1811

Pre-Student Teaching – Secondary

I&L 1876

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1821

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

 

SECONDARY EDUCATION – ENGLISH

 

Students desiring to teach English will choose either an English Literature or English Writing focus.

 

 

 

English Literature

 

 

8 semester course sequence map

 

9 semester course sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

  (Take 4 of the following 5)

 

ENGLIT 1012

18TH Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1100

Medieval Imagination

ENGLIT 1125

Renaissance in England

ENGLIT 1175

19th Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1325

The Modernist Tradition

 

 

ENGLIT 1552

History of the English Language

ENGLIT 0580

Introduction to Shakespeare

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

  (Take 2 of the following 5)

 

ENGWRT 0520

Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGWRT 0530

Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGWRT 0550

Introduction to Journalism

ENGWRT 0410

Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGWRT 0411

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

ENGWRT

Elective

 

 

English Writing

 

 

8 semester course sequence map

 

9 semester course sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

    (Take 2 of the following 5)

 

ENGWRT 0520

Introduction to Fiction Writing

ENGWRT 0530

Introduction to Poetry Writing

ENGWRT 0550

Introduction to Journalism

ENGWRT 0410

Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGWRT 0411

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

 

 

3 ENGWRT

Electives

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

  (Take 3 of the following 5)

 

ENGLIT 1012

18TH Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1100

Medieval Imagination

ENGLIT 1125

Renaissance in England

ENGLIT 1175

19th Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1325

The Modernist Tradition

 

 

ENGLIT 1552

History of the English Language

ENGLIT 0580

Introduction to Shakespeare

 

 

English (Literature and Writing) Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1332

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction – Secondary

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience – Secondary

I&L 1235

Teaching English in Secondary Schools

I&L 1236

Pedagogy Lab - English

I&L 1811

Pre-Student Teaching – Secondary

I&L 1876

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1821

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

 

Secondary Education – Mathematics

 

 

8 semester course sequence map

 

9 semester course sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

MATH 0220

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1

MATH 0230

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2

MATH 0240

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 3

MATH 0413

Introduction to Theoretical Mathematics

MATH 0420

Introduction Theory 1 – Variable Calculus

MATH 0430

Introduction to Abstract Algebraic Systems

MATH 1180

Linear Algebra 1

MATH 1270

Ordinary Differential Equations 1

MATH 1020

Applied Elementary Number Theory

MATH 1290

Topics in Geometry

 

 

Math Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1332

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction – Secondary

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience – Secondary

I&L 1470

Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools

I&L 1471

Pedagogy Lab – Mathematics

I&L 1811

Pre-Student Teaching – Secondary

I&L 1876

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1821

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

 

Secondary Education – Social Studies

 

Students desiring to teach Social Studies will choose either a History or Political Science focus.

 

 

 

History

 

 

8 semester course sequence map

 

9 semester course sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

HIST 0600

The United States to 1877

HIST 0601

The United States 1865-Present

HIST 0100 or 0180

Western Civilization 1 or 19th Century Europe

HIST 0101 or 1367

Western Civilization 2 or 20th Century Europe

HIST 0500 or 0501

Colonial Latin America or Modern Latin America

HIST Elective

(Minority or non-western)

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

ECON 0100 or 0110

Introduction to Microeconomic Theory or Introduction to

 

 Macroeconomic Theory

 

 

PSY 0310

Developmental Psychology

PSY 1001

Introduction to Educational Psychology

ANTH 0780

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

 

 

Political Science

 

 

8 semester course sequence map

 

9 semester course sequence map

 

 

Core Course Requirements

 

 

 

PS 0200

American Political Process

Take 2 of the following 3

 

PS 0300

Comparative Politics

PS 0500

World Politics

PS 0600

Political Theory and Analysis

 

 

PS 1202

American Constitutional Law

PS

Elective

 

 

Additional Required Courses

 

HIST 0601

The United States 1865-Present

HIST 0100 or 0101

Western Civilization 1 or Western Civilization 2

HIST 0500 or 0501

Colonial Latin America or Modern Latin America

PSY 1001

Introduction to Educational Psychology

ANTH 0780

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

 

 

Social Studies (History and Political Science) Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1332

Strategies and Techniques of Instruction – Secondary

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1702

Early Field Experience – Secondary

I&L 1280

Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools

I&L 1281

Pedagogy Lab – Social Studies

I&L 1811

Pre-Student Teaching – Secondary

I&L 1876

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1821

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

SPANISH EDUCATION (K-12)
Bachelor of Science
Teaching Certificate

Teacher candidates wishing to teach Spanish at any K-12 level choose this education track.  Spanish Education candidates can opt to earn a dual major by completing additional classes within the Spanish major during additional semesters. Students gain experience with students in elementary, middle, and high school. Study abroad to gain language fluency and cultural immersion is strongly encouraged.

Classes focus on

  • Pedagogy, assessment, and management of students;
  • Teaching diverse students;
  • In-depth content knowledge in a chosen discipline.

Spanish Education (K-12) 
            8  semester sequence map
            9 semester sequence map

 

Core Course Requirements

 

SPAN 0003 (if not exempt)

Intermediate Spanish 3

SPAN 0004 (if not exempt)

Intermediate Spanish 4

SPAN 0020 OR SPAN 0025

Conversation OR Grammar & Composition

SPAN 0055

Intro to Hispanic Literature

SPAN 1302

Advanced Composition & Style

SPAN 1300 OR SPAN 1331

Span. Phonetics OR Structure of Mod. Span.

Choice of FOUR additional classes:

SPAN 1400

Latin American Literature

SPAN 1403

Latin American Writers

SPAN 1410

Cinema – Hispanic World

SPAN 1450

Spanish Legends

SPAN 1600

Spanish Literature

SPAN 1807

Hispanic Special Topics

 

 

Spanish Education Courses

 

ADMPS 1001

Social Foundations of Education

EDPSY 0009

English Language Learners

I&L 1333

Strategies & Techniques of Instruction – K-12

I&L 1060

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 1

I&L 1061

Education of Exceptional Students in the Classroom 2

I&L 1703

Early Field Experience – K-12

I&L 1237

Teaching Spanish Methods

I&L 1238

Teaching Spanish Pedagogy Lab

I&L 1812

Pre-Student Teaching – K-12

I&L 1877

Student Teaching Seminar

I&L 1822

Student Teaching – Secondary

 

 

 

ENGLISH LITERATURE
Bachelor of Arts (51 credits)

 

Our English Literature major is distinctive in its balance of historical literary traditions, contemporary texts, critical theory, and cultural context.  Because we can combine a small college’s close attention to individual students with a large university’s library resources, our courses encourage a wide range of interdisciplinary linkages while developing skills in information processing and online database research.  The major engages students with challenging and provocative tests and in the process stimulates wide reading, understanding of a variety of literary traditions and genres, and critical thinking.


 

Core Courses 

6 courses (18 credits)

 

The core courses ensure familiarity with a wide range of interconnected literary traditions over centuries. These should be taken after 30 credits of university coursework.

 

ENGLIT 1012 

18th-Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1100 

Medieval Imagination

ENGLIT 1125

Renaissance in England

ENGLIT 1175

19th-Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1215 

Pre-20th-Century American Literature

ENGLIT 1325    

Modernist Tradition

   

 

Electives                             

6 courses (18 credits)

Choose any six of the remaining ENGLIT courses offered at Pitt-Greensburg. A partial list of elective classes is provided below. See the course descriptions in this publication or the current Schedule of Classes for additional choices. One of these courses will be used to satisfy the literature requirement for general education.

 

ENGLIT 0066

Introduction to Social Literature

ENGLIT 1026

American Poetry

ENGLIT 0110

Introduction to Literature 

ENGLIT 1065

Narrative Literature

ENGLIT 0310

The Dramatic Imagination

ENGLIT 1241

Jane Austen:  Books and Film

ENGLIT 0315  

Reading Poetry

ENGLIT 1248

Literature of Minority Women

ENGLIT 0325 

Short Story in Context

ENGLIT 1380

World Literature in English

ENGLIT 0360 

Women and Literature

ENGLIT 1552

History of the English Language

ENGLIT 0500 

Introduction to Critical Reading

ENGLIT 1572

Fantasy and Romance

ENGLIT 0580  

Introduction to Shakespeare

ENGLIT 1578

Fantasy Writers

ENGLIT 0590  

Formative Masterpieces

ENGLIT 1611

Development of the Novel

ENGLIT 0626

Science Fiction

ENGLIT 1640

Literature for Children

ENGLIT 0643

Satire

ENGLIT 1647

Literature of Adolescents

ENGLIT 0650

Irish Literature

ENGLIT 1701

Topics in Women’s Studies

ENGLIT 1022 

Literature of the American West

 

 

 

Related Area            4 courses (12 credits)

Choose four classes from one of the following departments: Classics, Communication, English Writing, French, History of Art & Architecture, Music, Philosophy, Spanish, or Theatre Arts. Other choices of departments for the related area are possible with the approval of the Academic Advisor.

Additional Requirement            1 course (3 credits)

After earning 90 credits, all literature majors must take ENGLIT 1950 to fulfill the capstone class requirement.

.

 

 

 

HISTORY
Bachelor of Arts (36 credits)

The History major is concerned with the broad range of experiences, events, and decisions which have taken place in the past and which have shaped our current world. Our program concentrates on the history of the United States, Latin America, and the world. It is also concerned with imparting an introductory knowledge of the basic tools of history.

 

Core Courses 

3 courses (9 credits)

 

Complete one survey course in each of the following areas:

 

 

 

HIST 0500

Colonial Latin America or

HIST 0501

Modern Latin America

   

HIST 0600

United States to 1877 or

HIST 0601

United States 1865 - Present

   
HIST 0710 World History to 1500 or
HIST 0711 World History 1500 to Present
   

Electives   

7 courses (21 credits)

 

 

Of the seven courses, five courses must be upper-level History courses.  The remaining two courses may be either upper-level courses, cross-listed courses, approved Classic courses, or survey courses.  A partial list of elective classes is provided below.  See the course descriptions in the current schedule of classes for additional choices.
   

CLASS 0010 

Greek Civilization

CLASS 0020

Roman Civilization

HIST 0180 19th Century Europe

HIST 0575

History of Modern Central America

HIST 0756 Intro to Islamic Civilization

HIST 1005

Special Topics

HIST 1035 20th Century World

HIST 1075

Slavery in the Atlanitc World

HIST 1104 Crusades

HIST 1140

History and Culture of Spain

HIST 1158

British Imperialism

HIST 1423 Modern China

HIST 1522

Brazil

HIST 1525

Mexico

HIST 1580

19th Century Latin America

HIST 1583

20th Century Latin American Revolutions

HIST 1611

American Revolution 1763–1791

HIST 1614

Civil War History

HIST 1616 Antebellum America
HIST 1715 Empires of Modern World
HIST 1730 Mongols
HIST 1753 Ottoman Empire
HIST 1793 History of Iran

 

 

Additional Requirements

2 courses (6 credits)

 

Histroy majors should enroll in HIST 1010 (Historical Inquiry and Methods) and HIST 1955 (History Capstone) in the latter part of their undergraduate experience.



HUMANITIES
Bachelor of Arts (39 credits)

The Humanities area option allows students to meet their individual educational needs by developing a major based on courses from several departments within the Division of Humanities. The selection of courses should reflect a theme or program that is developed in consultation with the faculty advisor.

 

Core Requirements

12 courses (36 credits)

To satisfy the requirements for a humanities area major, students select one department in which they take five to six courses (15–18 credits) and two other departments in which they take three to four courses (9–12 credits) each for a minimum total of 36 credits. An example program of study for a student who chose Communication as the major department and English Literature and History of Art & Architecture as the minor departments is shown below.

Communication

 

 

 

COMMRC 0300

Communication Process

COMMRC 0320

Mass Communication Process

COMMRC 1102

Organizational Communication

COMMRC 1106

Small Group Communication

COMMRC 1109

Nonverbal Communication

COMMRC 1111 

Theories of Persuasion

 

 

English Literature

 

 

 

ENGLIT 0580 

Introduction to Shakespeare

ENGLIT 0590

Formative Masterpieces

ENGLIT 1012

19th Century British Literature

ENGLIT 1611 

Development of the Novel

 

 

History of Art and Architecture

 

 

 

HA&A 0010

World Art

HA&A 1010

Approaches to Art History

 

 

Additional Requirement 

1 course (3 credits)

After earning 90 credits, all Humanities Area majors must take one of the capstone courses offered in the major area of concentration or one of the minor areas to fulfill the capstone class requirement.

     
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