University of Pittsburgh Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us

 

GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

Swanson School of Engineering—Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science

The Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science offers MS and PhD degrees in both areas as well as MS degree in Nuclear Engineering, and the graduate certificate in Nuclear Engineering which is open to all graduate students within the Swanson School of Engineering. The certificate in Nuclear Engineering may also be earned by qualified post baccalaureate students who are not seeking to also earn an MS degree.

Contact Information

Department Chair: Brian Gleeson, PhD
Main Office: 636 Benedum Hall
412-624-9784
Fax: 412-624-4846
E-mail: pittme@engr.pitt.edu
http://www.engineering.pitt.edu/Departments/MEMS/

MSE Graduate Director: Jung-Kun Lee, PhD

636 Benedum Hall

412-648-3395

E-mail: jul37@pitt.edu

ME Graduate Director: Qing Ming Wang, PhD

636 Benedum Hall

412-624-4885

E-mail: qiw4@pitt.edu

NE Graduate Director: Daniel Cole, PhD

636 Benedum Hall

412-624-3069

E-mail: dgcole@pitt.edu

MEMS Graduate Administrator: Carolyn Chuha

636D Benedum Hall

412-624-9722

E-mail: cac90@pitt.edu

Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers broad-based educational and research programs in materials science and engineering leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy. These programs are oriented toward the application of fundamental knowledge of materials science and engineering to the solution of real-world materials problems that impede technological progress. They are designed to educate engineers, providing them with the tools to become successful in research, development, production, management, and teaching. The department also offered a joint degree program with the Katz Graduate School of Business.

Basic courses on the structure, properties, and energetics of materials are taken in common. The student, working with faculty advisors, tailors the program to suit individual interests and demands of the student's chosen field of specialization through advanced and specialty courses.

The range of research programs in the department reflects the broad spectrum of interest of the faculty. However, interest in the structure and properties of materials and their relationship to materials processing is a common thread that ties together many of the programs. Research is aimed at building an understanding of basic phenomena that will lead to solutions of materials problems at the forefront of technological and social progress.

Current research programs are centered in several areas of ceramics, and magnetic materials: metals, including corrosion and oxidation; high-temperature materials; magnetic materials; materials for energy applications; addictive manufacturing; metal-forming processes; phase transformations in metals and ceramics; intermetallic phases; plastic deformation of metals; surfaces and interfaces; thermomechanical processing of steels; ceramic processing; sintering science; high-temperature superconductivity; electronic properties of ceramics; ferroelectrics and magnetorheological fluids; nanostructured materials; catalytic materials; thin film science and technology; and laser processing of materials

 

Master of Science Program

The Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering degree (MSMSE) may be pursued as either a Professional MS Track program (for practicing engineers) or a Research MS Track program. Students can tailor their individual MS program to emphasize different aspects of materials science and engineering (e.g., ceramics, metallurgy, etc.).

 

Admissions

A bachelor's or master's degree holder applying to the program must have cumulative grade point average (QPA) equal to or higher than 3.0 (B) or equivalent. Students who do not meet this requirement may be able to enter the program based on experience demonstrating their excellence, as evaluated by the Graduate Committee.

In some cases, depending on previous background and QPA, students may be admitted initially on a provisional basis. This usually requires students to secure grades of 3.0 (B) or better in courses that are required to obtain a better background in materials science and engineering and/or other graduate-level courses as deemed necessary by the Graduate Admissions Committee.

 

Professional MS Track

The professional MS track is primarily oriented toward part-time students currently working in industry.

 

Professional MS Track Requirements

The professional track consists of a minimum of 30 course credits (equivalent to 10 courses). There are no thesis or comprehensive examination requirements for this degree. Up to nine (9) credits of coursework counting towards the 30 course credits requirement may consist of non-MSE courses in other Engineering, Science or Mathematics disciplines that are approved by a student's advisor. No more than nine credits may be granted to a student as transfer credit for work done at another
accredited graduate institution. At least 21 course credits must be obtained from MSE 2000 and 3000 courses, not including Graduate Seminar  (MSE 3023 and 3024), MS Research (MSE 2997), and MS Thesis (MSE 2999). An independent graduate project (MSE 2998) can be conducted after consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and may account for 3 of the 21 required MSE credits. Students with non-MSE backgrounds are strongly encouraged to take for credit introductory courses (e.g. MSE 2067, MSE 2068 or equivalent). MS degrees are conferred only on those students who have completed all course requirements with at least a 3.00 (B) GPA.

 

Research MS Track

The research track is primarily for full-time students who have the intention to pursue a PhD or are strongly oriented toward a research career. The University transcript will include an entry indicating that a student is in the research MS track.

 

Research MS Track Requirements

The Research Track MS degree requires a minimum of 30 credits of course and research based graduate study, including at least 21 course credits. At most up to nine (9) credits of coursework counting towards the required minimum of 21 course credits may consist of technical courses in other non-MSE Engineering, Science or Mathematics disciplines that are approved by a student's advisor. No more than six (6) credits may be granted toward completion of the requirements for the Research Track MS for work completed at another accredited graduate institution. A minimum of 12 course credits must be derived from 2000- and 3000-level MSE courses, not including credits associated with Graduate Seminar (MSE 3023 and 3024), MS Research (MSE 2997), and MS Thesis (MSE 2999). Students with non-MSE backgrounds are strongly encouraged to take for credit introductory courses

(e.g. MSE 2067, MSE 2068 or equivalent). The student's advisor must approve the course sequence selection. In addition to coursework requirements a minimum of 3 credits of MS research (MSE 2997) and six (6) credits of MS Thesis (MSE 2999) are required. Master's degrees are conferred only on those students who have completed all courses required for the degree with an average grade of least a 3.00

(B) GPA.

 

MS Thesis

An MS student should initiate research work as early as possible and then register for MS research (MSE 2997). Once thesis preparation has begun, a student must register for thesis credits (MSE 2999) in each succeeding term until successful completion of the thesis and a final oral defense and comprehensive exam. The MS thesis document is at least expected to be a report on independently conducted research and must adhere to the School of Engineering defined style and format. A Style and Form Manual for a thesis is available in the Engineering Office of Administration.

The purpose of an MS thesis oral defense is to evaluate an MS thesis and the student's command of the research subject. The successful completion of a defense is a requirement for the MS degree. The thesis examining committee consists of at least three members of the MSE faculty who are recommended by the student's advisor and approved by the department chair. After successfully completing a defense, a student must deposit an electronic and/or hard copies of the approved thesis in accordance with the current guidelines for thesis submissions available from the Office of Administration of the School of Engineering or the MSE Program Office.

 

Part-time students may pursue the research MS track. However, they must recognize that, although their thesis topics may be related to the broad technical area of their employment, results of work-related routine technical activities, analysis, surveys, or studies conducted for employers are not acceptable for inclusion in MS theses. Furthermore, part-time students should become aware of the University Intellectual Property Ownership Policy before undertaking theses. Prospective students must clarify all of these issues before contemplating a research-based MS degree.

 

 

Doctor of Philosophy Program

The Doctor of Philosophy Program in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering is a research degree leading largely to careers in teaching and research in academia and in industry. This program is designed for excellent students. As the studies progress, students develop an understanding at the highest level in their area of specialization that must lead to an original contribution to the field in the PhD dissertation.

 

Admissions

A bachelor's or master's degree holder applying to the program must have a QPA equal to or higher than 3.3 (B+) or equivalent. Students who do not meet this requirement may be able to enter the program based on experience demonstrating their excellence, as evaluated by the Graduate Committee.

 

In some cases, depending on previous background and QPA, students may be admitted initially on a provisional basis. This usually requires students to secure grades of 3.3 (B+) or better in courses that are required to obtain a better background in materials science and engineering and/or other graduate-level courses as deemed necessary by the Graduate Admissions Committee

 

 

Requirements for the PhD Degree

A minimum of 72 credits is required for the PhD. Of the total of 72 credits required for the PhD degree a minimum of 36 credits must be coursework beyond the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. PhD students must maintain a minimum QPA of 3.3 (B+) in this coursework. The coursework consists of (I) a materials core (six required courses students must take in the first year of enrollment), (II) a group of courses tailored for each student's research and as required technical broadening beyond the MSE focus, (III) courses to address mathematical/numerical skills, and (IV) PhD Research and Dissertation credits. The student's advisor must approve the course sequence selection.

 

The 18 credits core course component must be taken within the first year of the program. Typically, PhD students will carry a course load of three courses per term until their coursework is completed. If a student's background is insufficient for a given graduate course, the student must prepare by attending appropriate undergraduate courses or through independent study. This should be arranged in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and the lecturing faculty of the relevant course(s).

 

A total of up to twelve (12) credits may be taken in relevant science, math, engineering disciplines outside of the MSE designation of graduate level courses and in different departments than MEMS. The selection of courses, in general, must be acceptable to the student's advisor.

 

Minimum credit requirements include:

 

Core Courses (18 credits)

MSE 2067: Elements of Materials Science and Engineering 1

MSE 2003: Structure of Materials

MSE 2011: Thermodynamics of Materials/Energetics

MSE 2013: Kinetics in Materials Science

MSE 2015: Electromagnetic Properties of Materials

MSE 2030: Mechanical Behavior of Materials

 

Students must score at least a B (3.0) in each of these six classes. If a student does not get at least a letter grade of B, the class must be taken a second time. These classes must be successfully completed before the student can apply for admission to PhD Candidacy.

 

Advanced Courses

A student must take advanced courses and technical electives. These are comprised of at least two courses (6 credits) selected by the student and his or her advisor as the best advanced preparation for research in the area of the dissertation, and two courses, as a broadening experience, to complement the student's PhD specialization and contribute significantly to career preparation.

 

 

Mathematics Courses

The student is required to take two mathematics/numerical courses for six (6) credits beyond those required for the materials science and engineering Bachelor of Science degree. They can be satisfied by many courses. This requirement may be waived if it was met in a previous program.

 

PhD Research and Dissertation Credits

Each student must also have:

At least six (6) credits of MSE 3997 (PhD Research);

At least 12 credits of MSE 3999 (PhD Dissertation);

 

Please note that registration for MSE 3999 is allowed only after the student has passed the Comprehensive Examination and defended the PhD Proposal, which qualifies the student for the status of PhD Candidacy.

 

The course requirements described in these guidelines are a minimum requirement. The minimum requirement of 72 credits of graduate work must be satisfied by combinations of research, course work and transfer credits for the award of a PhD degree. Students are allowed to take additional courses with the agreement of their advisors. In some cases, these courses may be suggested by the PhD Committee for better preparation for a given research area. Note that completion of the PhD degree and admission PhD candidacy require a GPA of B+ or better (≥3.3).

 

Graduate Materials Science Courses

Six core courses are offered annually and other graduate courses are offered on a two-year rotation.

 

MSE 2003 Structure of Materials (3 credits)

MSE 2011 Energetics (3 credits)

MSE 2013 Kinetics in Materials Science (3 credits)

MSE 2015 Electromagnetic Properties of Materials (3 credits)

MSE 2030 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3 credits)

MSE 2037 Nanomechanics, Materials and Device (3 credits)

MSE 2038 Applied Solid Mechanics (3 credits)

MSE 2041 Advanced Physical Metallurgy 1 (3 credits)

MSE 2043 Electron Microscopy in Materials Science (3 credits)

MSE 2045 Advanced Ferrous Physical Metallurgy (3 credits)

MSE 2046 Physical Metallurgy of Engineering Alloys (3 credits)

MSE 2050 Gas-Metal Reactions (3 credits)

MSE 2067 Elements of Materials Science and Engineering 1 (3 credits)

MSE 2072 Ceramic Processing (3 credits)

MSE 2077 Thin Film Processes and Characterization (3 credits)

MSE 2084 Introduction to Polymer Science (3 credits)

MSE 2110 Nuclear Materials (3 credits)

MSE 2111 Materials for Energy Generation and Storage (3credits)

MSE 2112 Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation: Molecular Dynamics (3 credits)

MSE 2113 Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation: Density Functional Theory (3 credits)

MSE 2115 Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Nuclear Plants (3 credits)

MSE 2130 Environmental Issues and Solutions for Nuclear Power (3 credits)

 

 

 

Mechanical Engineering

 

Graduate Degree Programs

The mechanical engineering graduate program offers PhD and master of science degrees in mechanical engineering, and master of science degree in nuclear engineering. Each graduate student's program is developed individually within very broad limits and is carefully designed to meet his or her needs and objectives. The graduate faculty is committed to high-quality research and teaching.  The curriculum is an integrated program of study in applied sciences, applied mathematics, and modern computational procedures that are relevant to the research emphasis in the department.  The research is focused on five major areas:  (1) Energy Technology: fluid mechanics, Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid dynamics, heat transfer, combustion, fuel cells, gas turbines, advanced thermodynamics cycles and hybrid systems, thermal hydraulics in nuclear energy generation, energy accountability and sustainability in electronic equipment; transducers and control; (2) Smart Materials, Transducers, Dynamic Systems and Control: Sensors and actuators based on smart materials, adaptive structures and materials, structural acoustics, active/passive noise control, micro-electro-mechanical systems, microfluidic devices, radio-frequency energy harvesting, structural acoustics, and structural vibration control, novel actuators and mechatronics; (3) Nanotechnology: process design and modeling, tribology, composite materials, computational materials, multiscale simulation methods; micro- and nano-fabrication and characterization methods; (4) Advanced Manufacturing: 3D additive manufacturing, inkjet printing, laser manufacturing, topology optimization; and (5) Biomechanics: constitutive modeling of soft biological tissues, experimental and computational biomechanics, biomechanical modeling/simulation; musculoskeletal biomechanics, upper extremity biomechanics, joint replacement. In addition to the MS and PhD degrees, the department also offers a dual degree program with the Katz Graduate School of Business.

 

Admissions

An application for either the MS in mechanical engineering or PhD program is judged on the student's prior academic record, GRE scores (required for PhD applicants), the accreditation of the prior degree granting school, and the capability of the department to match the applicant's interest with the program. A foreign national student who did not receive his or her Bachelor of Science or Master of Science degree from an accredited U.S. institution is required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (213 for the computer-based exam/80 internet-based exam) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and receive a minimum result of Band 6.5 as well as the GRE. GRE testing may also be required for applicants of the MS program if requested by the Graduate Committee. Students with a Bachelor of Science degree in another engineering field, mathematics, or physics will also be considered for the graduate program with the possibility that prerequisite courses may be required.

A part-time program is available for students who are employed in local industries. Part-time students usually carry from 3 to 6 credits per term in either day or evening classes.

Requirements for the Master of Science Program

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree (MSME) can be pursued as either a Professional MS Track (for practicing engineers) or a Research MS Track. The Professional Track is best suited to those currently in industry who are looking to increase their knowledge.

Professional Master of Science Track

Students must take at least one of the following mathematics courses:

  • ME 2001: Differential Equations
  • ME 2002: Linear and Complex Analysis
  • ME/ECE 2646: Linear Systems Theory

Mechanical engineering courses are offered from the following subject areas:

Dynamic Systems and Control

 

  • ME 2015: Human Robotics and Control
  • ME 2020: Mechanical Vibrations
  • ME 2027: Advanced Dynamics
  • ME 2042: Measurement and Analysis of Vibroacoustic Systems
  • ME 2045: Linear Control systems            
  • ME 2046: Digital Control Systems           
  • ME 2242: Optimal Filtering and Estimation
  • ME2247/ECE 2647: Introduction to Nonlinear Control Design
  • ME/ECE 2646: Linear Systems Theory
  • ME/ECE 2671: Optimization Methods
  • ME/ECE 3650: Optimal Control
  • ME 2080: Introduction to MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)
  • ME 2082: Principles of Electromechanical Sensors & Actuators

 

Fluid Mechanics

  • ME 2003: Introduction to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)
  • ME 2055: Computer Analysis Transport Phenomena
  • ME 2070: Microfluidics
  • ME 2074: Advanced Fluid Mechanics 1

MEMS/NEMS

  • ME 2010:  Nanomechanics, Materials & Device
  • ME 2049   Thermal Management in Electronic Sys
  • ME 2080:  Introduction to MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)
  • ME 2082:  Principles of Electromechanical Sensors & Actuators
  • ME 2222:  Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation:  Molecular Dynamics
  • ME 2223   Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation: Density Functional Theory

Materials and Biomechanics

  • ME 2005:  Structure of Materials
  • ME 2007:  Elements of Materials Science and Engineering 1
  • ME 2008:  Elements of Materials Science and Engineering 2 (Proposed)
  • ME 2009:  Processing of Materials
  • ME 2010:  Nanomechanics, Material & Device
  • ME 2048:  Engineering Alloys for Construction
  • ME 2060:  Numerical Methods
  • ME 2062:  Orthopaedic Engineering
  • ME 2064:  Intro to Cell Mechanobiology
  • ME 2067:  Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
  • ME 2069:  Materials Science of Nanostructures
  • ME 2084: Introduction to Polymer Science
  • ME 2086: Mechanics of 3D Printed Materials and Structures
  • ME 2222: Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation: Molecular Dynamics
  • ME 2223: Nanoscale Modeling and Simulation: Density Functional Theory

Nuclear

  • ME 2100: Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering
  • ME 2101: Nuclear Core Dynamics
  • ME 2102: Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Control
  • ME 2103: Integration of Nuclear Plant Systems with the Reactor Core
  • ME 2104: Nuclear Operations Safety
  • ME 2105: Integrated Nuclear Power Plant Operations
  • ME 2106: Nuclear Quality Assurance Management
  • ME 2107 :High Performance Computing Algorithms &
  • ME 2110: Nuclear Materials
  • ME 2112: NuChemistry and Radiochemistry
  • ME 2115: Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow In Nuclear Plants
  • ME 2116: Boiling Water Reactor-Thermal Hydraulics and Safety
  • ME 2118: Computational Radiation Transport
  • ME 2120: Mathematical Modeling of Nuclear Plants
  • ME 2122: Management Principles in Nuclear Power
  • ME 2125: Case Studies in Nuclear Codes and Standards
  • ME 2130: Environmental Issues and Solutions for Nuclear Power

Solid Mechanics

  • ME 2003: Introduction to Continuum Mechanics
  • ME 2004: Elasticity
  • ME 2010: Nanomechanics, Materials and Device
  • ME 2022: Applied Solid Mechanics
  • ME 2033: Fracture Mechanics
  • ME 2047: Finite Element Analysis

Thermal Systems

  • ME 2049: Thermal Management in Electronic Systems
  • ME 2050: Thermodynamics
  • ME 2053: Heat and Mass Transfer
  • ME 2055: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer
  • ME 2056: Introduction to Combustion Theory
  • ME 2074: Advanced Fluid Mechanics 1
  • ME 2254: Nanoscale Heat Transfer

A student may take up to 9 graduate credits from other engineering, mathematics, or physics departments.

Research Master of Science Track

The Research MS Track is designed for individuals seeking an in-depth research experience in mechanical engineering. A total of 21 course credits and a master’s thesis are required for this degree. Upon entering the program, students plan a program of study with the aid of their faculty advisor.

Students must take:

  • ME 2997: MS Research (3 credits)
  • At least 6 credits of ME 2999: MS Thesis
  • At least one of the following mathematics courses: ME 2001: Differential Equations, or ME 2002: Linear and Complex Analysis or ME/ECE 2646 Linear Systems Theory

A student may take up to 9 graduate credits from other engineering, mathematics, or physics departments.

Doctor of Philosophy Program

The goal of the Doctor of Philosophy program in the Department of Mechanical Engineering is to develop the student for the rigorous career demands of engineering research either in the industrial or academic fields. The student is educated at the pioneering edge of technical, management, systems design, and decision-making concepts. This work requires a strong background in mathematics and one of the specialty areas of mechanical engineering. The PhD student is expected to attend full time. It is possible, however, to seek candidacy as a part-time student with the stipulation that the PhD candidate must spend at least one full-time academic year on campus.

A graduate student who has completed eight course courses of the master’s program in good standing can go directly into the PhD program. An applicant who has received the Master of Science in mechanical engineering from a university with an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)-accredited mechanical engineering curriculum, or who has substantially equivalent preparation, is eligible to enter the Doctor of Philosophy program in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

If deficiencies in engineering preparation are noted, as in the case of science majors from accredited institutions, admission may be granted after the completion of such designated undergraduate courses as may best correct the deficiencies. Only those individuals whose preparation has been judged satisfactory for graduate study in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will be admitted to full graduate status.

Doctoral level courses are numbered in the 3000 series, but courses numbered in the 2000 series may also be appropriate for doctoral study.  Courses numbered below 2000 do not meet the minimum requirements for doctoral study, although they may be taken to supplement a doctoral program. Students must maintain a minimum cumulative QPA of 3.30 in courses to be eligible to take the preliminary and comprehensive examinations as well as to graduate.

Plan of Study. During the first term in the doctoral program the student must submit a plan of study for approval by the department. Minimum course requirements (beyond the MS or equivalent degree) include:

 

30
  credits for M.S. degree (or equivalent)
18
 

course credits at an advanced graduate level (Approval is required by the    student’s advisor and the graduate committee.  Courses may NOT include: ME 2001, ME 2002, ME 2003, ME 2004, ME2007, ME 2020, ME 2022, ME 2047, ME 2053, ME 2060, ME 2074, ME2100, ME2125 and any course that is a dual graduate/undergraduate course.  Non-duplicating courses from other departments may be allowed subject to approval.)

6
  ME3997 – PhD Research
12
  ME3999 – PhD Dissertation (after admission to PhD Candidacy)
6
  additional credits approved by advisor and graduate committee
72
  total credits

 

 

THE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAM

 

The Department of Mechanical and Materials Science offers graduate studies in advanced nuclear engineering. The graduate faculty is committed to high-quality research and teaching. The curriculum is an integrated program of study in applied sciences, applied mathematics, and modern computational procedures that are relevant to the research emphasis in the department. The research is focused on three major areas: (1) Nuclear Energy Technology (2) Operations and Safety (3) Nuclear Materials (4) Nuclear Modeling and Simulations and (5) Radiology and Radiochemistry.

 

DEGREE PROGRAMS

 

An application for the MS program is judged on the student’s prior academic record, GRE scores, the accreditation of the prior degree granting school, and the capability of the department to match the applicant’s interest with the program. A foreign national student who did not receive his or her Bachelor of Science from an accredited U.S. institution is required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (213 for the computer-based exam / 79-80 internet-based exam) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and receive a minimum result of Band 6.5 as well as the GRE. Students with a Bachelor of Science degree in another engineering field, mathematics, or physics will also be considered for the graduate program with the possibility that prerequisite courses may be required. A part-time program is available for students who are employed in local industries. Part-time students usually carry from three to six credits per term in either day or evening classes.

 

Applicants who do not meet these requirements will be considered on an individual basis with strong emphasis given to academic promise, career orientation, work experience, and preparation in engineering and related disciplines. In some cases, applicants may be admitted provisionally until certain deficiencies in either coursework or academic achievement are satisfied.

 

Master of Science Program

Upon entering, the student plans a program of study with the aid of the faculty advisor. The course requirements can be met by either the

(1) Thesis Option (Research M.S.Track):

21 course credits

3 ME 2997

6 ME2999

30 Credits

Or the

(2) Non-Thesis Option (Professional M.S.Track): 30 course credits.

 

Thesis Option (Research M.S. Track)

The research M.S. track is primarily for those students who wish to advance the technology. Students in this track will be advised to take those courses best suited for the research degree. Full time graduate students who are supported by department scholarships must choose the research M.S. track. Each candidate must provide a suitable number of copies of the thesis for review and use as designated by the thesis examining committee, consisting of at least three members of the faculty recommended by the major advisor and approved by the department chair. The major advisor must be a Mechanical Engineering or Material Science Faculty member with an appointment in the Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Department. Nonnative English speakers are encouraged to take ENGR 2050 Technical Writing (however this course does not count toward graduation). The final oral examination in defense of the master's thesis is conducted by the thesis committee, and a report of this examination signed by all members of the committee must be filed in the office of the dean. After the examination, the approved ETD must be deposited to the ETD Online System where it will be reviewed by the ETD Student Services Staff in the dean's office of the student's school and submitted for microfilming and deposit in the University Library System. A receipt for the ETD processing/microfilming fees and any necessary paperwork must be submitted to the appropriate ETD Staff in the Office of Administration.

Non-Thesis Option (Professional M.S. Track)

 

The professional MS programs are oriented toward full-time students seeking a career in industry, and part-time students currently working in industry. Full-time GSR-supported students might change to professional M.S. track, upon request/approval by the sponsoring faculty advisor and the graduate program. Professional master's degrees are conferred upon those students who demonstrate comprehensive mastery of their general field of study. The professional master's degrees normally require the satisfactory completion of at least 30 course credits of graduate study approved by the department.

No more than six credit hours may be granted to a student as transfer credit for work done at another accredited graduate institution. (See Acceptance of Transfer Credits section for further detail.) MS/MBA students are limited to transferring six credit hours. All credits earned in the ME master's degree program must be at the graduate level (the 2000 or 3000 series courses).

Master's degrees are conferred only on those students who have completed all course requirements with at least a 3.00 QPA. (Visit http://www.bulletins.pitt.edu/graduate/index.html) for further detail.

 

In either case, students seeking the Master of Science degree in Nuclear Engineering must take at least one of the mathematics courses, ME 2001, ME 2002 or ME / ECE 2646. Up to nine (six for MS/MBA students) graduate credits from other engineering, mathematics, or physics departments may be used in fulfilling the remaining course requirements. The MS/MBA students are also required to complete an integrated project course. Please contact the Graduate Director for a copy of the guidelines for the integrated project course.

 

Subject Course List

 

Nuclear

 

  • ENGR/ME 2100: Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering
  • ENGR/ME 2101: Nuclear Core Dynamics
  • ENGR/ME 2102: Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Control
  • ENGR/ME 2103: Integration of Nuclear Plant Systems with the Reactor Core
  • ENGR/ME 2104: Nuclear Operations Safety
  • ENGR/ME 2105: Integrated Nuclear Power Plant Operations
  • ENGR/ME 2106: Nuclear Quality Assurance Management
  • ENGR/ME 2107: High Performance Computing Algorithms and Methods
  • ENGR/ME 2110: Nuclear Materials
  • ENGR/ME 2112: Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry
  • ENGR/ME 2113: Radiation Detection and Measurement
  • ENGR/ME 2115: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow In Nuclear Plants
  • ENGR/ME 2116: Boiling Water Reactor-Thermal Hydraulics and Safety
  • ENGR/ME 2118: Computational Radiation Transport
  • ENGR/ME 2120: Mathematical Modeling of Nuclear Plants
  • ENGR/ME 2122: Management Principles in Nuclear Power
  • ENGR/ME 2125: Case Studies in Nuclear Codes and Standards
  • ENGR/ME 2130: Environmental Issues and Solutions for Nuclear Power    

 

Nuclear Engineering Graduate Certificate

The Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sciences is offering a certificate for students in the Swanson School of Engineering with an interest in nuclear science and technology. Students from the Bioengineering, Civil, Chemical, Industrial, Mechanical, Materials Science, and Electrical/Computer engineering programs may be most interested in obtaining this certificate. Fifteen units are required to complete the certificate. This certificate may be combined with graduate courses in any one of the School's seven Master of Science (MS) degree programs or the certificate may be awarded stand-alone as a post-baccalaureate certificate. Since the nuclear courses are cross-listed as Mechanical Engineering courses, they can be counted toward both a MSME degree and Nuclear Engineering Graduate Certificate.

This program provides coursework for graduate level nuclear engineering education with a focus on nuclear operations and safety. This focus on nuclear operations and safety not only fulfills a recognized educational need, but is also designed to take advantage of unique industrial resources in the Pittsburgh area which will greatly facilitate student learning.

The renaissance of nuclear science and technology in the United States has created a need in the marketplace once again for engineers with nuclear knowledge. The University of Pittsburgh aims to meet these marketplace needs by preparing engineers through the graduate certificate in nuclear engineering. Classes are taught by current and former nuclear engineers, including faculty with experience conducting commercial nuclear operations programs for Westinghouse or the Beaver Valley Nuclear Station and with certificates or operation licenses from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Objectives

The objectives of the nuclear engineering certificate are:

  • To develop the basic competencies needed by science and engineering graduates to contribute quickly and effectively to the renaissance of nuclear science and technology in the United States and abroad.
  • To create a benchmark educational program that can serve as a model throughout academia

Requirements

Students must satisfactorily complete five of the following nine courses in order to earn either the graduate or post- baccalaureate certificate in nuclear engineering:

  • ENGR/ME 2100: Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: an undergraduate degree in engineering or science.
  • ENGR/ME 2101: Nuclear Core Dynamics (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: ENGR/ME 2100 or an undergraduate degree in nuclear engineering, work experience in nuclear engineering with instructor's permission.
  • ENGR/ME 2102: Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Control (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: ENGR/ME 2101
  • ENGR/ME 2103: Integration of Nuclear Plant Systems with the Reactor Core (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: ENGR/ME 2100
  • ENGR/ME 2104: Nuclear Operations Safety (3 credits)
    • Pre-req:ENGR/ME 2100
  • ENGR/ME 2105 Integrated Nuclear Power Plant Operations (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: ENGR/ME 2102, 2103
  • ENGR/ME 2106: Nuclear Quality Assurance Management (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2107: High Performance Computing Algorithms and Methods  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2110: Nuclear Materials (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: an undergraduate course in materials science or instructor's permission
  • ENGR/ME 2112: Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2113: Radiation Detection and Measurement  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2115: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Nuclear Plants (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: an undergraduate course in heat transfer and fluid flow or instructor's permission.
  • ENGR/ME 2116: Boiling Water Reactor-Thermal Hydraulics and Safety  (3 credits)
    • Pre-req: an undergraduate course in heat transfer and fluid flow or instructor's permission.
  • ENGR/ME 2118: Computational Radiation Transport  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2120: Mathematical Modeling of Nuclear Plants  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2122: Management Principles in Nuclear Power  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2125: Case Studies in Nuclear Codes and Standards  (3 credits)
  • ENGR/ME 2130: Environmental Issues and Solutions for Nuclear Power (3 credits)

The program will be sufficiently flexible to accommodate students from a wide spectrum of engineering disciplines.

Who may apply

  • Practicing engineers currently in or aspiring to a leadership role in the nuclear industry,
  • Engineering professionals who desire graduate level education in nuclear engineering with a focus on safe nuclear plant operations,
  • New graduates with a minimum of a bachelor's degree in a technical discipline, and
  • Professionals who manage multidisciplinary teams for project design or management in the nuclear industry

How to apply

At the University of Pittsburgh, any student pursuing a Master's degree in the Swanson School of Engineering may pursue the graduate certificate in nuclear engineering as a focus track. It is also possible for individuals who wish to achieve the certificate only to apply to the program.

Questions

Inquires regarding the graduate certificate in nuclear engineering can be directed to:


Daniel G. Cole, PhD, P.E.: Director of Steven R. Tritch Program in Nuclear Engineering
636 Benedum Hall
dgcole@pitt.edu

Inquires regarding registration can be directed to:


Carolyn Chuha: Mechanical Engineering Graduate Administrator

636 Benedum Hall
Cac90@pitt.edu
412-624-9722

 

Master's-Level and Doctoral-Level Mechanical Engineering Courses

 



GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 

 

 

 Home | Top of Page | Last Updated: Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us