University of Pittsburgh Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us
r

BRADFORD BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

INTRODUCTION TO THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
AT BRADFORD

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford (Pitt-Bradford) is a comprehensive four-year undergraduate college of the University of Pittsburgh. Founded in 1963, Pitt-Bradford traces its roots back to 1787, the founding year of the University of Pittsburgh. Pitt-Bradford awards the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees in 25 major areas of study, the Associate of Science degree in two major areas of study, and the Associate of Arts degree in one area of study. In addition, the college provides certification programs in elementary and secondary education, preprofessional programs in a variety of health-related and other areas, and minor concentrations in more than 40 areas of study.

Pitt-Bradford is located in northwestern Pennsylvania near the New York state border on north-south U.S. Route 219, just 10 miles south of Interstate 86. Nearby are the major population centers of Pittsburgh (165 miles), Buffalo (80 miles), and Toronto, Canada (165 miles). The modern 170-acre Pitt-Bradford campus, which was first constructed in 1970, completed a major capital expansion program in 2003. This resulted in the renovation and expansion of a comprehensive sport and fitness center and a student center, and the construction of a fine arts building and theater. Combined with other existing buildings and a mountain setting that is unparalleled for its beauty, Pitt-Bradford has become one of the most physically attractive campuses in the northeastern United States.

Because of Pitt-Bradford’s location near the Allegheny National Forest, opportunities for outdoor recreation are plentiful. This includes cross-country and downhill skiing in the winter (the slopes of Holiday Valley are just minutes away) and boating, swimming, fishing, hiking, and camping in the warmer months both in and around the Allegheny Reservoir.

The city of Bradford and its environs, population 20,000, has a rich historic heritage. It was founded during the Pennsylvania oil boom, and some of the world’s finest crude oil is still pumped from Bradford wells. Shopping and banking facilities, a well-staffed regional medical center, and all the other amenities of an established small city are available to Pitt-Bradford students.

Accreditation

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford is fully accredited through the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Campus Buildings, Centers, and Facilities

Blaisdell Hall

Blaisdell Hall is the new building that houses the Division of Communication and the Arts and all programs in the fine arts, which include drama, music, and studio arts. Opened in the summer of 2003, the academic wing houses classrooms, art studios, music practice rooms, a state-of-the art broadcast studio, a rehearsal facility, and faculty offices and meeting rooms. In spring 2004, the Bromeley Family Theater, housed within Blaisdell Hall, opened. Included are a 500-seat theater with a full-stage house, and facilities for designing and building sets for a variety of productions.

Fisher Hall

Fisher Hall contains classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices for the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology and Environmental Science, Engineering, Psychology, and Physics. Fisher Hall also houses the College’s Computing, Telecommunications, and Media Services Center. Students have 24-hour access to one of the two computer-aided learning centers (CALCs). Fisher Hall also houses the 100-seat Rice Auditorium.

Frame-Westerberg Commons

The Frame-Westerberg Commons (the student union), newly expanded and remodeled in 2003, is the “living room” of the campus. The Commons contains on its first floor the college dining rooms; the snack bar/coffee shop; the Panther Shop, formerly known as the Book Center; the campus post office; a game room, meeting and conference rooms; student lounges; and WDRQ, the campus radio station. The Office of Conference Services is also there. On the second floor are the Offices of Student Affairs and Career Services, Student Health and Counseling Services, Residential Life and Housing, and Student Activities, as well as the student offices for the Student Government Association, Student Activities Council, and student publications.

T. Edward and Tullah Hanley Library/Administration Building

Dedicated and named in October of 1989, the T. Edward and Tullah Hanley Library holds 84,000 volumes and more than 400 periodical titles. PITTCAT, the online computerized catalog, includes the Hanley Library’s holdings as well as 3.9 million additional volumes from other University of Pittsburgh libraries. Hanley Library contains a number of small-group study areas, an AV listening/viewing room, an art gallery, and the Academic Success Center. The Hanley Library also houses the Offices of the President, Admissions, Admissions, and TRiO Student Support Services.

Sport and Fitness Center

The Sport and Fitness Center, opened in fall of 2002, provides a magnificent addition to the campus. Included in this complex is a 1,200-seat performance arena that is designed for basketball, volleyball, and general recreation; a fully equipped Fitness Center with the latest in physical conditioning equipment; and an Exercise Arts Studio to support dance, martial arts, and aerobics instruction. In addition, the Tom L. McDowell Fieldhouse is a full-sized auxiliary gymnasium used primarily for recreation and intramurals, physical education classes, and other events. Also included is a six-lane National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) regulation-length swimming pool, which supports swim instruction, recreation, and intercollegiate swim teams. The building also houses offices and facilities for the Department of Athletics and Recreational Sports, as well as offices and classrooms for Sport and Exercise Science and Athletic Training majors. The latter includes a computer lab, physiology lab, and a National Athletic Training Association (NATA) standard athletic training room. Outdoor recreational facilities include a lighted softball field, a baseball field, tennis courts, two handball courts, several outdoor basketball courts, football/softball fields, a sand volleyball court, and the Richard E. McDowell Community Trail.

Swarts Hall

Swarts Hall contains classrooms and faculty offices for the Departments of Criminal Justice, Nursing, Business Management, English, French, Spanish, Philosophy, Writing, Mathematics, Anthropology, Sociology, History, Political Science, and Economics. The Office of the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs is on the second floor of Swarts. Two state-of-the-art computer labs are also available for student use. One of them also serves as an interactive television (ITV) and multimedia classroom.

Computer Facilities

All Pitt-Bradford students have access to six computer areas, five computer-aided learning centers (CALCs), and an open lab area, giving students access to more than 130 high-powered Windows XP-based computers. Each computer area has access to a laser printer. The 113 Fisher Hall CALC is the primary CALC on campus. It currently contains a variety of hardware, including a number of Windows-based computers, full-page scanner, CD-RW units, laser printer, and high-quality color laser printer. The 110 Fisher Hall CALC is a 24-hour-a-day lab and is used for instructional purposes during the day. It contains Windows-based computers, a laser printer, and an instructor’s computer connected to an overhead projection system. The Hanley Library open lab area is an unsupervised computing area containing Windows-based systems. The CALC in 106 Swarts Hall is an instructional lab that comes equipped with Pentium-level Windows-based computers, a laser printer, and an instructor’s computer connected to an overhead projection system. The CALC in 158 Sport and Fitness Center is an instructional lab that comes equipped with Windows-based computers, all with CD-RW units, a laser printer, and an instructor’s computer connected to an overhead projection system. This is our largest lab with 28 student machines. The 236 Swarts Hall lab is a computerized multimedia room. It has 20 Windows computers, cameras, televisions, and a rear projection system to facilitate remote instruction. All computers are networked and fully enabled for Internet access. Likewise, all residence halls are wired for Internet access.

Outreach Services and Sponsored Programs


Pitt-Bradford is committed to engaging in the communities within northwest
and north central Pennsylvania to promote continuing education, economic
development and partnerships that allow the resources of the University and the
resources of the community to work synergistically. Three program areas
channel these aims into activities: Professional and Workforce Education,
the Business Resource Center, and Sponsored Programs.

Professional and Workforce Education

The Professional and Workforce Education programs make continuing education
accessible and affordable to students interested in advancing a career or
satisfying a personal interest. Offerings include a range of certificate
programs, professional development courses, computer skills training
courses, personal instruction in fine arts and summer youth programs.

Workforce Education refers to specialized and contracted training programs
designed to meet specific requests from business and industry. Facilitating
critical job training programs increases the sophistication of a regional
workforce competing in a global economy with ever-changing demands for
technologic proficiency.

Programs are held on campus as well as at outreach sites in cooperation with
the Community Education Council of Elk and Cameron Counties (St. Marys
site), the Potter County Community Education Council (Coudersport, Port
Allegany and Galeton sites), and the Warren/Forest County Higher Education
Council (Warren site). Customized job training programs are offered either
on campus or on location for business and industry.

Business Resource Center

The Business Resource Center (BRC) helps individual entrepreneurs with
successful business start-up and helps existing business with expansion
planning. Services include comprehensive business plan development, product
research and planning, operational problem solving, identifying loan and
other financial assistance programs and marketing plan development.

Pitt-Bradford is a partner in Pennsylvania’s Guaranteed Free Training
Program (WEDnetPA). WEDnetPA enables eligible companies to receive grant
money for either basic skills or information technology training, and BRC
assists in the application for and administration of State funds.

Sponsored Programs

Pitt-Bradford pursues an intentional strategy to compete for Federal and
State grant monies, as well as to seek funding from corporations and private
foundations. These efforts focus on the development and enhancement of
academic programs and student services, and enable Pitt-Bradford to
participate in regional community and economic development projects.


Division of Student Affairs

The Division of Student Affairs is concerned with creating an atmosphere on campus that is complementary to and supportive of the academic environment. This division includes the Offices of the Vice President and Dean of Student Affairs, Admissions, Athletics and Recreational Sports, Career Services, Counseling Services, Financial Aid, Health Services, Residential Life and Housing, and Student Activities. Each of these offices provides important support services for students, as well as cocurricular programs that enhance the college experience for all. Offices for the Division of Student Affairs are located on the second floor of the Frame-Westerberg Commons. Athletic Department offices are located in the Sport and Fitness Center, and Admissions is located in Hanley Library. Financial Aid is located in The Hanger.

Athletics and Recreational Sports

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford is a Division III member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC). A diversified program of seven intercollegiate sports for men and seven intercollegiate sports for women is maintained. Men’s sports are basketball, soccer, swimming, cross-country, golf, tennis and baseball. Women’s sports include basketball, soccer, swimming, volleyball, cross-country, softball, and tennis. A professional medical staff, including a team physician and two certified athletic trainers, support the student athletes at Pitt-Bradford.

Intercollegiate and recreational sports are an integral part of campus life at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. The intercollegiate athletic program is consistent with the established University mission dedicated to the education of undergraduate students prepared to deal effectively with and contribute to a changing society. A balance between academic achievement and athletic accomplishment is emphasized. The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford believes in athletics as a valuable part of a well-rounded education.

Recreational Sports

The primary goal of the intramural and recreational sports program is to provide individuals of various ability levels with opportunities for fun and leisure through recreational competition. The intramural and recreational sports program provides a year-round schedule for seasonal sports with voluntary participation in regularly organized and supervised activities. Under the direction of the director of recreation and intramurals, students organize and implement most activities.

The intramural and recreational sports program includes opportunities for both men and women in team, individual, coed, and leisure-time sports such as basketball, flag football, tennis, softball, volleyball, indoor soccer, downhill and cross-country skiing, fishing, hiking, camping, canoeing, and bicycling. Opportunities to compete in club sports programs are also available. Outdoor recreation facilities include a lighted softball field, outdoor basketball courts, tennis courts, soccer/football fields, and a sand volleyball court.

Career Services

The Office of Career Services provides career counseling and career-related programs and services, and coordinates placement assistance functions for students and alumni.  Career Services helps students explore various academic majors, minors and career options through individual career counseling and vocational interest testing.  Also, FOCUS 2 and Siggy 3, computer-based guidance systems, are available to help students explore how their interests, skills and values relate to academic and career decisions.  

Students are encouraged to use PantherLink, Pitt-Bradford’s powerful career management system that connects students and alumni with full-time and part-time employment opportunities, internships, and employers.   Career Services helps students develop a comprehensive career action plan and develop and enhance life-long skills in areas such as goal setting, resume writing, interviewing and conducting a job search.   Students may also access Optimal Resume, a cutting-edge resume development software program.  Workshops, job fairs and special career-related events, such as From Backpack to Briefcase program, the annual Spring Career Fair and the Career Networking Luncheon, are held throughout the year.  The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford is member of the WestPACS and PERC consortiums and participates in the Fall and Spring WestPACS Job Fairs and the annual PERC Teacher Job Fair.  Career Services also maintains a comprehensive Career Services Library and a career website which provides information on employment opportunities, graduate and professional schools, employers, job boards,  internships, upcoming events and  job fairs.

Counseling Services

Counseling services are available to students who have personal concerns or problems. The director of counseling services, a licensed psychologist, provides individual counseling and crisis intervention, as well as programs to assist students in identifying and resolving problems that may interfere with their adjustment. Referrals for counseling or psychiatric services are also sometimes made to The Guidance Center, a community counseling facility located near campus. Confidentiality is maintained in all contacts.

Health Services

The director of health services, a registered nurse, provides health services and programs for Pitt-Bradford students. Primary assessment and treatment of health problems and injuries, health counseling, and referrals are included in the scope of services. A campus physician provides verbal consultation daily and a medical clinic on campus every 2-3 weeks. The Student Health Center also includes a Self-Care Center for colds, cuts, and upset stomachs.

Immunization Requirements

Immunization requirements for all new full-time students born after 1956 are as follows:
Measles immunization two doses
Rubella immunization one dose
Mumps immunization one dose

The month, day, and year of immunization must be provided.

Note: One current MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine received within the past three years satisfies the University immunization requirement. Written proof or a photocopy of the immunization record must be submitted with the student health evaluation form. MMR vaccine is available for a $60 fee at Student Health Services 814-362-5272

Meningitis vaccine is highly recommended by the State of Pennsylvania for students who will be living in campus housing. If a student living on campus does not wish to receive the meningitis vaccine, he/she must sign a waiver (or the parent must sign the waiver if the student is under the age of 18) prior to moving on campus.

Please call 814-362-5272 if you have questions about either of these important immunization requirements.

Center for Leadership and Service

The Center for Leadership and Service serves to create and develop community service opportunities for students. The mission of the center is to integrate the ethic of service across the college and make community service a central element of the undergraduate experience.

Participation in community service experiences emphasizes the importance of support systems, respect for others and the establishment of a sense of community. The Center staff works closely with students and organizations to place them in volunteer settings that are compatible with their interests and goals.

The Center helps coordinate large campus/community volunteer efforts such as Make a Difference Day. Each fall, the Center teams up with the Bradford Regional Medical Center to help support the Downtown Bradford October Fun Fest. Also, the Center sponsors the annual Leadership Development Series and the Leadership and Service Awards ceremony.

In 2004, the Center became a certifying organization for the President's Volunteer Service Award that is issued by the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation on behalf of the President of the United States to recognize the best in American spirit, and to encourage all Americans to improve their communities through volunteer service, and civic participation to both individuals and groups.

Residential Life and Housing

Pitt-Bradford has established a distinctive approach to campus living through its apartment-style housing facilities. Seventy-six townhouse apartments, thirty-nine garden apartments, and twenty-seven suite-style apartments provide accommodations for two to six students each and are complete with kitchenettes and living rooms. Twenty resident advisors (RAs) trained in interpersonal skills, mediation, fire safety, CPR, and first aid staff the apartment units.

All freshmen and sophomores who do not live in their own homes or with immediate relatives in the Bradford area are required to live on campus. Juniors, seniors, and students 21 years of age or older may live off campus. All freshmen living on campus are required to purchase the 260-meal per-term board plan; a 195-meal option and a 145-meal option are available for upperclassmen. All meal plans may be purchased with Flex dollars that can be used for additional food items only at various locations on campus. Resident students must submit a housing application and a housing reservation fee before being assigned to a room. Students may indicate their choice of roommates; however, the University reserves the right to make all room assignments.

Rules, regulations, and policies regarding on-campus living are published in the Pitt-Bradford Student Handbook, which is distributed to all students at the beginning of the term. Students are expected to conduct themselves as adults and respect the rights of others at all times.

 

Student Activities

More than 30 campus clubs and organizations exist to serve the cocurricular needs of students. In addition, the Student Activities Council of the Student Government Association provides students with a variety of programs, which includes but is not limited to lectures, comedy, dances, concerts, trips, and special events (such as Alumni and Family Weekend, Sibs and Kids Weekend, and Winter Week). The director of student activities serves as advisor to the Student Activities Council and is available to work with students who wish to form a new club or organization on campus. Most programs in student activities take place in the Frame-Westerberg Commons (student union facility), which provides a variety of facilities to help meet the cocurricular needs of the campus community.

Other Student Services

TRiO Student Support Services (SSS) program provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirements and serves to motivate students toward the successful completion of the college education. The goal of TRiO–SSS is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants and facilitate the process of transition from one level of higher education to the next. Services provided include but are not limited to: basic study skill instruction; and academic, personal, career, or financial counseling.

Campus Ministries

The Board of Campus Ministries is composed of local Bradford clergy representing Christian (Protestant and Roman Catholic) and Jewish traditions. This ecumenical board provides programs for the campus community throughout the year and encourages interested students to become involved in one of the local churches or synagogue. During the fall and spring terms, Bible studies and retreats are made available and are generally coordinated by representatives of campus ministries, faculty advisors, and a representative from the Coalition for Christian Outreach. A Roman Catholic mass is celebrated on campus each weekend, and Protestant and Jewish students enjoy easy access to the local downtown churches and synagogue.

New Student Orientation

All new full-time students of traditional age are required to attend a two-day pre-orientation session (called Beginnings) in July, at which time they receive academic advising from the faculty, register for fall term courses, and participate in a number of social and educational programs. Group discussions on topics related to college life are also part of this program.

Immediately prior to the start of the fall term is an extended three-day orientation, which is designed to help make the transition to college a successful one, while also giving students the opportunity to meet all other members of the incoming class. For those who enter college in January, a one-day orientation session is held on the day before classes begin.

New nontraditional students, as well as incoming transfer students, participate in a one-day orientation program that takes place on designated dates in the summer months or on the day before classes begin in January.

Campus Government and Judicial Organizations

Student Government Association

The Student Government Association (SGA) is elected by the student body and is authorized by the University to represent students on all matters related to college life. SGA is headed by an executive board of seven students: president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, Student Activities Council president, parliamentarian, and one freshman representative. The purpose of SGA is to provide students with opportunities to participate in the decision-making processes of the University, to consider and make recommendations on all phases of student life, and to serve as a principal forum for discussion and dialogue regarding student concerns. The SGA also allocates all revenues to clubs and organizations that are generated through the Student Activities Fee.

Student Judicial Board

The Student Judicial Board is authorized to hear cases of student policy violations and make recommendations to the vice president and dean of student affairs regarding what sanctions, if any, should be imposed.

Greek Council

The Greek Council is the governing body that oversees the affairs and concerns of the five social fraternities and sororities. Headed by an Executive Board comprised of a president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, activities chairperson, and sergeant at arms, the Greek Council meets weekly to establish standards and coordinate activities for the Greek organizations. In addition, it reviews and recommends dates for fall and spring term new member programs. Greek Council also serves as the judicial body for Greek organizations that have violated Greek Council and/or University policies.

Student Campus Media

The Source is the official student newspaper of the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. It is written and edited by students with the advice and support of a faculty advisor and is published twice monthly during the fall and spring terms. Membership on the staff is open to all students.

The college literary magazine, Baily’s Beads, publishes students’ prose, poetry, and art once a year at the end of the spring term.

WDRQ is the Pitt-Bradford college radio station. It broadcasts to the campus at 1620 on the AM dial. Membership on the radio staff is open to all students.

Clubs and Organizations

The majority of student clubs and organizations are approved and funded by the Student Government Association. Any group of students desiring to form a new club or organization may do so by submitting a constitution, list of officers and members, and proposed budget to the SGA.

Registered and Recognized Clubs and Organizations (Funded by SGA)

Anime Club
Anthropology and International Club
Art Club
Biology and Chemistry Club
Black Action Committee
Cheerleading Squad
Christ In Action
Collegiate Liberals of America
Conservative Union
Education Club
Engineering Club
Greek Council
Habitat for Humanity
History Club
Nontraditional Student Association (NTSA)
Rainbow Alliance
Secret Adventurer’s Society (SAS)
Sociology Club
Sport and Recreation Management Club
Student Activities Council
Student Advocates for Free Expression (SAFE)
Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE)
Student Nurse Organization (SNO)
The Source, campus newspaper
WDRQ Radio Station

Registered and Recognized Clubs and Organizations (Not Funded by SGA)

Alpha Phi Omega
Colleges Against Cancer
Panthers Against Tobacco (PAT)
Society of Success and Leadership

Registered Social Organizations (Not Recognized, Not Funded by SGA)

Delta Phi Omega
Lambda XI
Phi Kappa Epsilon
Sigma Lambda Chi
Zeta Alpha Chi

Admissions

Students are encouraged to submit an application for admission, along with a $45 application fee and complete credentials, during the first half of their senior year in high school for the following fall term. Students wishing to enter the University in the spring term should submit application materials by the University’s priority deadline of December 1.

Admissions Procedure

Candidates for admission are expected to forward:

  1. A completed, signed application form with a $45 fee;
  2. Official transcripts from all secondary schools attended; and
  3. All official test scores (SAT/ACT) to:
    University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
    Director of Admissions
    300 Campus Drive
    Bradford, PA 16701-2898

The following criteria are considered when rendering an admissions decision: high school curriculum and course load, standardized test scores, rank in class, recommendations, and extracurricular activities. Minimum course preparation should include four years of English, three years of history (social science), two/three years of mathematics, two/three years of science, and two years of modern language.

Students are strongly encouraged to come to campus for an interview and a tour. Contact the Office of Admissions to arrange for an appointment by calling either 814-362-7555 or 1-800-872-1787, or by sending an e-mail message to admissions@www.upb.pitt.edu.

Requirements for Admissions

Applicants must complete 15 or 16 high school units (a unit refers to one year of study in high school), depending on program of study. Students are encouraged to complete as many college preparatory courses and Advanced Placement courses whenever possible to help academically prepare them for the rigors of the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford’s curriculum.

 

Admissions requirements are as follows:

Algebra
1 unit
English
4 units
Plane Geometry
1 unit
(required for engineering
and math students only)
1/2 unit
Trigonometry  
History
1 unit
Modern Language
2 units*
Laboratory Science
1 unit**,#
Academic Electives
5 units
_______
TOTAL
15 units

 *Two units of the same language
**Nursing students are required to have Biology and Chemistry with lab
# Engineering and Math students are required to have Physics with lab

 


Admissions requirements for Associate Degree in Nursing and Bachelor of Science degree in radiological science

 

English
4 units
Mathematics  
2 units
Social Science  
3 units
Biology with Lab  
1 unit
Chemistry with Lab  
1 unit
Academic Electives  
5 units
TOTAL  
16 units

 

Prospective students applying to the Associate Degree in Nursing program will be admitted directly with a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 2.75 and a minimum SAT score (or ACT equivalent score) of 1025. Students transferring from another college or university must have completed a minimum of 12 college-level credits with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75. Students failing to meet these criteria may be admitted to a preparatory program, which would include courses in college success, basic math and English, preparatory chemistry, and human biology.

Prospective students applying to the Bachelor of Science degree in radiological science program will be admitted with a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 2.50 and a minimum SAT score (or ACT equivalent score) of 960. Students transferring from another college or university must have completed a minimum of 12 college-level credits with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50. Students failing to meet these criteria may be admitted to a preparatory program.

All applicants must arrange for all information to be released and sent to the Office of Admissions before any admissions decision can be rendered.

The following are requirements for students enrolled in the nursing and radiological science majors.  Information related to each of these items is detailed in the respective program’s orientation packet, provided to the student, and reviewed during the summer orientation program. 

Annual Health Evaluation
Annual Criminal Background Check
Health Insurance
Liability Insurance
Uniform for Clinical Experience
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) Certification
HIPAA Training and Certification

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse.

 

 

Admission Plans

Early Admission: High school students who have completed the requirements for graduation by the end of the junior year may apply for early admission to Pitt-Bradford.

Applications should be submitted to the Office of Admissions. A decision on early admission requires the following:

  1. Academic excellence throughout high school
  2. Consent of parents or legal guardian
  3. Approval of Admissions Committee
  4. Approval by school district to complete requirements on collegiate level

Readmission: Previously registered students who wish to return to Pitt-Bradford and continue their studies who have been away from the University for more than three consecutive terms must request readmission to the University prior to registration.

Students transferring credit into the University must have a grade of C- or better. Quality points are not transferred into the University from other institutions. Therefore, the cumulative grade point average is computed only on the basis of quality points earned at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. A student must complete no fewer than 30 undergraduate credit hours at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

A student must complete no less than 60 undergraduate credit hours at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

Commonwealth Fund for Disadvantaged Students: Sponsored by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, this program helps to meet the needs of Pitt-Bradford students who, because of special financial circumstances, may not be able to afford to attend college.

International Students: Applicants for admission from foreign countries are urged to complete their applications, online, by February 1 for fall term enrollment and by October 1 for spring term (January) enrollment. In addition to the information required for secondary students, international students should follow the following guidelines:

  1. If the student's first language is not English, he/she must successfully complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and achieve a minimum score of 550 on the written exam, a 213 on the computer-based test, or a 79–80 on the Internet-based test.
  2. All documentation must have English translations submitted.

A confirmation deposit of $100 is required before any student visa is issued from the University. The student must then process the visa and a valid passport through the U.S. Consulate or Embassy and apply for an F-1 Student Visa.

Limited scholarship money is available to international students.

Confirmation Deposit: A $100 confirmation deposit is required of all full-time students. The deposit is a down payment for the first term tuition and is nonrefundable.

Deferred Admission: Applicants who have been admitted into the University can defer their admission for up to one (1) year (two terms). A $100 nonrefundable confirmation deposit is required to reserve the student’s place for the desired term.

Transfer Students: Students wishing to transfer to the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford from other two- and four-year accredited institutions must be in academic and disciplinary good standing.

The following information needs to be submitted for transferring:

  1. Application for admission;
  2. Official transcripts from all institutions attended; and
  3. High school records or GED.

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford may consider for transfer only those credits earned in courses with academic fields in which the other university’s programs are recognized. Credit may be applied toward transfer for completed courses with a grade of C- or better from the transfer institution.

General Equivalency Diploma (GED): Applicants with incomplete high school preparation and who have been out of school more than two years may qualify for admission by taking the professional examinations given by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and earning a General Equivalency Diploma (GED). Information about these examinations may be obtained by writing to: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Education, Bureau of Special Services for Pupils, Division of Guidance and Testing, Harrisburg, PA 17102.

 

Freshman Guarantees For Pitt Graduate/Professional Schools Through Pitt's Regional Campuses

•   Business Administration

•   Communication Science

    (Speech Pathology/Audiology)

•   Education

•   Engineering

•   Health Information Systems

•   Information Sciences

•   Law

•   Nursing

•   Occupational Therapy

•   Physical Therapy

•   Public Health

•   Public and International Affairs

•   Social Work

The University of Pittsburgh is a member of the Association of American Universities, which includes the top 62 research institutions in North America. It is also one of the top recipients of National Institutes of Health research dollars and is affiliated with the internationally renowned University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). For outstanding freshman applicants, the University offers a limited number of freshman guarantees to some of its most competitive graduate and professional programs.

 

During your undergraduate career at one of Pitt’s regional campuses, as you complete the academic course work related to your guarantee program, there also will be plenty of out-of-the-classroom learning opportunities available to you that will allow you to complement your course work with experiential learning in the form of volunteer work, internships, and/or undergraduate research. The cities where our regional campuses are located offer many such opportunities. You are encouraged to take full advantage of them as you plan your undergraduate career.  

 

To be considered for a graduate/professional school guarantee, as a prospective freshman you must apply to one of our regional campuses at Bradford, Greensburg, Johnstown, or Titusville and indicate the pre-professional field of study on your admissions application unless otherwise noted, below. Note that these are guidelines for guarantee consideration, as competition may vary from year to year. Application early in the senior year of high school is recommended.

Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Science in Accounting Guarantees

Katz Graduate School of Business

•      Apply for freshman admission to a regional campus as a business major.

•      Be in top 10% of high school graduating class and score 1350 or higher on SAT (combined     Critical Reading and Math) or 31 ACT.

•      Students who do not attend high schools that rank but who have an “A” average in high school, and who score 1350 or higher on the SAT, will be considered.

•      Earn a business degree as a full-time undergraduate student at a University of Pittsburgh regional campus.

•      Earn a cumulative GPA at the University of Pittsburgh of at least 3.50.

•      For enrollment in the MBA program, you must achieve a score of 630 on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) within

       three years prior to enrollment, have a minimum of two years of relevant work experience, and participate in a successful interview by the MBA admissions team. Students must apply to the full-time or part-time MBA program after graduation from a regional campus.

•      The GMAT is waived for the MS in accounting program. Students must apply to the MS in accounting program during their senior year in business at a regional campus or after graduation from business.

•      The offer of guaranteed admission for the MBA or MS in accounting program remains in effect for five years after graduation from a business major at a regional campus.

•      For information about the Katz Graduate School of Business, go to www.katz.pitt.edu

Communication Science Disorders (speech pathology/audiology) Grantee

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

•      Indicate Pre-Communication Science on admissions application.

•      Achieve a minimum SAT score of 1300 (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 29 ACT.

•      Complete the Bachelor of Arts degree at a regional campus with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or higher, as well as a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the core pre-requisite courses for communication science disorders.

•      Achieve minimum scores at the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative sections and a score of 3.5 or better on the analytical writing section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

•      Complete the CSD Centralized Application Service (CSDCAS) process as required.

•      For information about the CSD graduate program, go to www.shrs.pitt.edu/macsd.

 

School of Education Guarantee for Admission into the Master of Education (M.Ed.) or the Master of Teaching (MAT) Programs

•      Indicate Pre-Education on admissions application.

•      Earn a 3.5 grade point average in high school and a minimum 1250 SAT (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 28 ACT.

•      Maintain a 3.25 grade point average as a full-time undergraduate student at a regional campus (individual instances where a student’s grade point average falls below 3.25 will be reviewed by the Dean of the School of Education).

•      Attend a School of Education Information Session.

•      Declare the specific teacher education program by the end of the junior year.

•      Complete all prerequisite courses for the teacher education specialty area.

•      Candidates in foreign language must also attain a rating of at least Advanced Low on the OPI examination administered by ACTFL.

•      Show evidence of substantial experience working or volunteering with children or adolescents as a teacher, tutor, camp counselor, etc.

•      For information about the Graduate School of Education, go to www.education.pitt.edu/programs/graduate.aspx.

 

Swanson School of Engineering Guarantee

•     Indicate Pre-Engineering as your intended field of study on the admissions application.

•      Achieve a minimum SAT score of 1400 (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 32 ACT.

•      Be in the top 5 percent of your high school graduating class or have an equivalent grade point average (GPA).

•      Complete relocation to the Pittsburgh campus Swanson School of Engineering after accruing 34 credits at a regional campus in the required pre-requisite courses with a 2.75 GPA for all graduate programs except Bioengineering; for Bioengineering, a 3.5 is required.

•      Complete an undergraduate degree in the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or better.

•      For more information about graduate engineering programs, go to www.engr.pitt.edu.

Health Information Systems Guarantee

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

•      Indicate pre-HIM on admissions application.

•      Complete an undergraduate degree at Pitt with an overall QPA of 3.5 or higher.

•      Completion of prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of C.

•      Students offered the guarantee will be given the options of pursuing either the MS-HIS or MS-HIS RHIA Options.

•      For information about the Health Information Systems graduate program go to www.shrs.pitt.edu/mshis.

School of Information Science Guarantee

•      A bachelor’s degree from a Pitt campus earned in a STEM Field.

•      An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or better.

•      Complete at least one undergraduate programming course.

•      For more information about the School of Information Sciences, go to www.ischool.pitt.edu.

School of Law Guarantee

•      Indicate Pre-Law on admissions application.

•      Be in top 10 percent of high school graduating class with a 1300 SAT (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 29 ACT test result.

•      While enrolled full-time at a regional campus, maintain a 3.5 grade point average.

•      Complete an undergraduate degree at a regional campus.

•      At point of application to law school, satisfy a standard character review and attain a 162 LSAT result.

•      Note: For students not eligible for a freshman guarantee, working toward early admission to the School of Law after three years of study in arts and sciences or applying through our early decision program may be a desirable alternative.

•      For information about the School of Law, go to www.law.pitt.edu.

School of Nursing Guarantee

•      Indicate Nursing on admissions application for the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford or Johnstown.

•      Be in the top 10% of high school graduating class with a minimum 1350 SAT (combined Critical Reading and Math) score or 31 ACT.

•      Participate in research opportunities in addition to curricular requirements.

•      Establish a relationship with a faculty member (for mentoring) in area of interest by first term of senior year.

•      Complete the Bachelor of Science in nursing degree at a Pitt campus with a science and general grade point average of 3.5 or higher as a nursing student.

•      Attain a score of 310 or higher on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

•      Fulfill all specific requirements for selected graduate program.

•      Note: Students offered the guarantee will be given the option of pursuing either the master’s, DNP, or PhD program in nursing.

•      For information about the graduate programs in the School of Nursing, go to

www.nursing.pitt.edu/academics.

Occupational Therapy Guarantee - School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

•      Indicate Pre-Occupational Therapy on admissions application.

•      Complete an undergraduate degree at a regional campus with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or higher; completion of the prerequisite courses with a minimum grade of C and prerequisite GPA of 3.5.

•      Achieve minimum scores at the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative sections and a score of 3.5 or better on the analytical writing section of the GRE General Test.

•      Complete the OT Centralized Application Service (OTCAS) process as required.

•      For information about the OT program, go to
www.shrs.pitt.edu/mot.

Physical Therapy Guarantee - School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

•      Indicate Pre-Physical Therapy on admissions application.

•      Rank in the top 10 percent of high school graduating class and achieve a 1350 SAT I (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 30 ACT score.

•      Maintain a 3.5 or better science and overall grade point average (GPA) while enrolled in an undergraduate program at a regional campus.

•      Complete all prerequisite coursework required for admission to the DPT program.

•      Achieve minimum scores at the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative sections and a score of 3.5 or better on the analytical writing section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

•      Demonstrate evidence of adequate exposure to the field of physical therapy.

•      Complete the PT Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) process as required.

•      For information about Pitt Public Health, go to
www.publichealth.pitt.edu.

Graduate School of Public Health (Pitt Public Health) Guarantee

•      Apply to a regional campus.

•      Maintain a minimum 3.3 grade point average while satisfying the minimum course work requirements.

•      Complete an undergraduate degree at a regional campus.

•      Achieve minimum scores of 155 (70th percentile) on the Verbal section, 152 (60th percentile) on the Quantitative section, and a score of 3.5 or better on the Analytical Writing section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

•      For information about Pitt Public Health, go to
www.publichealth.pitt.edu.

Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) Guarantee


•      Apply to a regional campus.

•      Be in top 10 percent of high school graduating class with a 1300 SAT (combined Critical Reading and Math) or 29 ACT result.

•      Maintain a minimum 3.5 grade point average in arts and sciences while satisfying the minimum course work requirements.

•      Achieve minimum scores of 154 each on verbal and quantitative sections and a scores of 4.0 or above on the analytical writing section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

•      Demonstrate a commitment to public service through internships, volunteer, and/or work experience in the fields of public and international affairs.

•      Apply to the Master of Public Administration, Master of Public and International Affairs, or Master of International Development programs.  The offer of guaranteed admission remains in effect for three years after graduation from one of the regional campuses with a bachelor’s degree.

•      For information about GSPIA, go to www.gspia.pitt.edu.

School of Social Work Guarantee

•      Apply to a regional campus.

•      Indicate Pre-Social Work on the admissions application.

•      Earn a 3.5 grade point average in high school with a 1200 SAT combined Critical Reading and Math) or 26 ACT result.

•      For information about the School of Social Work, go to www.socialwork.pitt.edu.

 

Students have two options

Option 1

•      Complete the requirements for admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Social Work (BASW) in the School of Social Work with a 3.5 or higher quality point average (QPA). The BASW program is an upper division program beginning in the junior year offered at the Oakland Campus only.

•      Complete the BASW program with an overall 3.0 QPA.

•      Complete the application to the Masters of Social Work program.

Option 2

•      Complete your undergraduate degree at a regional campus with a minimum of a 3.0 QPA

•      Have completed no less than 30 credits in both liberal arts and social sciences and a 3-credit course in statistics.

•      Complete the application to the Masters of Social Work program.

•      For information about the School of Social Work go to www.socialwork.pitt.edu

 

Readmission: Returning Students

Matriculated students (not including continuing education, nondegree-seeking, or visiting students) who interrupt their enrollment for more than one term (fall or spring), and who have not been suspended for academic reasons must reapply for admission through the Office of Admissions. Students who interrupt their enrollment for one term or less may return and register for classes by contacting the Enrollment Services Office.

Student Right-to-Know Graduation Rate Disclosure

Statistical information concerning the graduation rate for the Bradford campus of the University of Pittsburgh, as required by the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act, is available upon request from the Office of Admissions.

Student Financial Aid

The Office of Financial Aid at Pitt-Bradford is committed to serving students and families by providing counseling and consumer information to enable the student to get the maximum assistance for which he/she qualifies. Pitt-Bradford has designed a comprehensive financial aid Web site to assist in understanding the process and answering many general questions. (For information, please go to www.upb.pitt.edu/financialaid.aspx) Additionally, our financial aid professionals are available to address any questions or concerns.

In order to receive a determination for financial assistance, students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA can be completed online at www.fafsa.gov. It must be completed and submitted to the federal processor by March 1 prior to the start of the award year for priority consideration. The Pitt-Bradford school code is 008815 and must be entered on the FAFSA to ensure receipt of the information. It will come up as University of Pittsburgh.

The student's family is expected to help fund college expenses according to financial ability as determined by the FAFSA. Students are encouraged to explore all opportunities for financial support, including federal, state, local, and private sources.

The following types of financial assistance are available to students based on their financial need as determined by an analysis of the information contained on the FAFSA, with priority for some types given to those who file by March 1:

Federal Pell Grant—Eligible students are awarded grants from the federal government in amounts ranging between $602 and $5,550 (for 2012-13) without repayment requirements.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)—Federal grants ranging from $200 to $1,000 are awarded tothe neediest Federal Pell Grant eligible students without repayment requirements.

Federal Perkins Loans—Federal loans ranging between $500 and $2,000 are awarded to  needy eligible students with interest and repayment deferred until after graduation. This loan has a fixed 5% interest rate. No interest accrues while the student is enrolled at least half time.

Federal Work-Study Program—This need based program provides federally supported part-time employment opportunities for eligible students, typically at $7.75/hour for up to eight hours per week.

Federal Direct Stafford Loans— The Department of Education administers direct federal educational loans that provide a base amount of $5,500 a year for Level 1, $6,500 per year for Level 2, and $7,500 a year for Levels 3 and 4. Loans may be subsidized or unsubsidized depending on the need as determined by FAFSA. No interest accrues on the subsidized portion of the loan while the student is in school. Interest may be paid or deferred on the unsubsidized portion. The interest rate is a fixed 6.8%.

Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans—This loan is available for parents of dependent undergraduate students. Families are eligible to borrow up to the costs of attendance less other aid. This loan is credit-based. The interest rate is a fixed 7.9%.

State Grants—Students must apply to their state scholarship program for assistance. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania residents can apply for the Pennsylvania State Grant (PHEAA) by completing the FAFSA. The necessary information will be sent to PHEAA, and students will be notified of their eligibility in May. PHEAA state grant awards ranged from $400 to $3,978 for the 2011-12 year. Students from other states should check whether their state provides grant assistance that can be used at Pitt-Bradford.

Obtain more information on your state grant program by looking at the Directory of State Higher Education Agencies online at http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/Programs/EROD/org_list.cfm?catagory_ID=SHE.

Donor Scholarships—Privately funded scholarships ranging from $200 to $3,000 are awarded to eligible students based on specifications predetermined by the individual donors. Scholarships require a minimum 2.00 GPA for consideration. Below are the various clubs, organizations, industries, foundations, and individuals who support scholarship programs at Pitt-Bradford.

Endowed Scholarships


Distinguished Scholarships

  • Preston R. Abbey Scholarship—established by Paul R. Abbey
  • American Refining Group/Harry R. Halloran, Jr. Scholarship and Sustainability Endowment Fund—established by Harry R. Halloran, Jr.
  • Miriam Barcroft Blaisdell Endowed Scholarship—established by the Philo and Sarah Blaisdell Foundation
  • Jack Campbell and Martha Mackowski Scholarship—established by Jack Campbell and Martha M. Campbell
  • Michael R. Cavalline Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. George P.evans
  • Dorothy Reed-Berdena Reed Coit Scholarship Fund—established in memory of sisters Dorothy H. Reed and Berdena Reed Coit
  • Joseph and Barbara DeFrees Scholarship—established by the DeFrees Family Foundation
  • Dresser Foundation Inc. Science and Engineering Scholarship—established by the Dresser Foundation Inc.
  • W. Clarence and Mary W. Fesenmyer Scholarship Fund—established by Colonel Mary K. Fesenmyer
  • William D. and Harriet R. Gallup Scholarship—established by Frederick W. Gallup, Esq., Mr Edward R. Gallup, and Ms. Margaret Gardner
  • Glendorn Foundation Non-Traditional Student Scholarship—established by the Glendorn Foundation
  • James D. Guelfi Scholarship and Endowment—established by Henry and Norma Guelfi and friends of Jim Guelfi
  • Tullah Hanley Scholarship—established by Tullah Hanley
  • William F. Higie Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. William Higie and Family, Glendorn Foundation
  • Charles and Mary Ann Huber Scholarship—established by Pure Tech Inc./Bradford Travel Service
  • Margaret “Connie” Johnson Memorial Scholarship—established by Dr. David L. Johnson
  • KOA Speer Electronics Scholarship—established by KOA Speer Electronic, Inc.
  • Edgar and M. Catherine LeMage Scholarship—established by the Estate of M Catherine LeMage
  • Seetal Nadella Memorial Scholarship— established by Dr. and Mrs. V. Rao Nadella
  • Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association Scholarship—established by the Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association
  • Lisa Pfohl Memorial Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Cornell N. Pfohl III
  • Gregory F. Powell Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Anne Putnam Mallison Scholarship Fund—established by William Mallison
  • Agnes L. and Lewis Lyle Thomas Memorial Scholarship— established by the Agnes L. Thomas Estate
  • Virginia Jack Tiffany and George O. Tiffany Scholarship—established by Greater Bradford Preservation Committee
  • The Anna and Art Turnquist Mt. Jewett Scholarship—established by Mary Ann Lambertsen
  • Edward J. and Caroline C. Urban Scholarship—established by Caroline C. Alleman
  • Harry M. Wick Pre-Law Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Kearney
  • Robert Wick Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • The Bruce and Beverly Perry Yellow Dog Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Perry


General Scholarships

  • Livingston and Evelyn Alexander Presidential Labor Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. Livingston Alexander
  • American Association of University Women-Bradford Branch Scholarship—established by the Bradford Branch of the American Association of University Women
  • Anonymous Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Anne Taylor Babasick Memorial Scholarship—established by the friends and relatives of Anne Taylor Babasick
  • Bazzoui Associate Degree in Nursing Scholarship—established by Dr.  and Mrs. Widad Bazzoui
  • Dr. Patricia Stevens Bianco Semester at Sea Scholarship—established by Dr. Patricia Stevens Bianco
  • David L. Blackmore Scholarship—established by friends and family of David L. Blackmore
  • Elizabeth B. Blaisdell Scholarship—established by family and friends of Elizabeth "Betty" Blaisdell
  • Gregory W. Booth Family Scholarship—established by Greg and Cherie Booth
  • Bradford Area Public Library-Frances Mottey Beck Foundation Student Internship Fund—established by the Bradford Area Public Library
  • Dr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Breston Chemistry Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Breston
  • David L. Brown Family Scholarship—established by David L. and Ann W. Brown
  • Earl and Agnes Buchheit Family Scholarship – established by Mr. and Mrs. Peter Buchheit
  • John T. Burkart Scholarship—established by Thomas J. Burkart, MD
  • Sarah Ann Burton Memorial Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Gregory T. Burton
  • Robert L. and Patricia A. Carlson Memorial Scholarship Fund—established by R. Michael and Susan Carlson, JohnP. and Terri Carlson, and Michael and Cathleen C. Medden
  • The Chapman Family Scholarship established by Mr. William W. Chapman
  • Edwin and Ruth Clemens Scholarship—established by Edwin and Virginia "Ruth" Clemens
  • Dr. Charles E. and Dr. Elizabeth M. Cleland Scholarship—established by The Honorable and Mrs. John M. Cleland
  • Bob Conaway Scholarship—established by family and friends of Bob Conaway
  • Copy Connection Scholarship—established by Copy Connection
  • County National Bank Scholarship—established by County National Bank
  • DeWitt and Augusta Crouch Scholarship—established by Eva Crouch Erickson
  • Current Events Club History Scholarship—established by Current Events Club
  • Lucy M. DePetro Scholarship—established by Lucy M. DePetro
  • Dilks Family Scholarship established by Robert C. and Susan Crossett Dilks, Robert C. Jr. and Jennifer T. Dilks, and Jason P. and Dr. Allison M. Dilks
  • Kathryn Geoghegan DiSorbo Memorial Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. DiSorbo
  • ESB Broadcasting Scholarship—established by radio station WESB
  • Exchange Club of Bradford Scholarship/John Benedict /Anthony “Bib” DeLucia Memorial Scholarship—established by Augie DeLucia, Elmer DeLucia and the Exchange Club of Bradford
  • K. James Evans and Lisa M. Fiorentino Scholarship—established by Dr. K. James Evans and Dr. Lisa M. Fiorentino Evans
  • Fairway Ford Endowed Scholarship—established by Fairway Ford Lincoln Mercury
  • Howard L. and Dorothea C. Fesenmyer Scholarship—established by Michael and Susan Carlson, David and Cindy Fesenmyer, Jon and Judy Kirk, and Dorothea Fesenmyer
  • Phillip K. and Shirley L. Fuhrman Scholarship—established by Dr. Nancy Fuhrman and Mr. David Fuhrman
  • Robert D. Galey Merit Scholarship—established by the family of Robert D. Galey
  • Leo J. and Jessie S. Gallina and Father Leo J. Gallina Scholarship—established by Father Leo J. Gallina
  • Phillip John Gallina Memorial Scholarship—established by Father Leo J. Gallina
  • Basil and Harriet Gildersleeve Memorial Scholarship—established by Howard L. Fesenmyer and R. Michael Carlson 
  • Jamie Ann Pascarella Giordano Memorial Scholarship—established by family and friends of Jamie Ann Pascarella Giordano
  • Girl Scout Gold Award Scholarship—established by Naomi G. Carlson
  • Stanley, Bettie, and Robert Gleason Scholarship—estalished by James and Colleen Gleason, Duane and Barbara Bartlebaugh, John and Jeanie Gleason, and Suzanne Gleason
  • Barbara and Harvey Golubock Petroleum Technology Fund—established by Harvey and Barbara Golubock
  • Gordon Family Scholarship—established by Alan and Nancy Gordon
  • Jill Miller Graham Scholarship—established by the Estate of Jill Miller Graham
  • Roger W. Graham Scholarship—established by the Estate of Roger Graham
  • Hugh A. Grant Scholarship—established by Susan L. Grant
  • Tom and Dusty Gray Family Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Burton, Mr. and Mrs. James Gleason, and Mr. Shawn Gray
  • Jeffery and Joan Guterman Broadcast Communication Scholarship—established by Jeffery and Joan Guterman
  • Hannah L. Hamlin Scholarship—established by The Hannah Hamlin Memorial Fund
  • Jack C. Hermes Scholarship—established by Jack C. Hermes
  • Robert Samuel Herzog Memorial Scholarship—established by Mary Katherine Herzog
  • Gary and Wyona Hyde Scholarship—established by Gary and Wyona Hyde
  • Jardini Family Fund—established by David and Dawn Jardini
  • L. Samuel Johnson Endowed Scholarship—established by faculty, staff, friends, and alumni
  • Richard S. Johnson Arts Scholarship Fund—established by Richard S. Johnson
  • Ann and Dick Kessel Scholarship Fund—established by Ann and Dick Kessel
  • Jeffrey Brian Kessel Memorial Scholarship—established by friends and family of Jeffrey Brian Kessel
  • Carol and Larry Killian Scholarship - In Memory of Our Parents—established by Carol and Larry Killian
  • Kiwanis Club of Bradford Scholarship—established by the Kiwanis Club of Bradford
  • Sanford Klausner Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Jack and Grace Knapp Fund for Forensic Education—established by Kathleen Knapp
  • The Krieg Family Memorial Scholarship—established by William J. Krieg
  • Lambda Xi Sorority Scholarship Fund in Memory of Alissa Ann Cameron—established by the Lambda Xi Sorority
  • Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Laskey Memorial Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. DiSorbo
  • William Sr. and Alyce Leven Scholarship—established by William Leven and Ray and Mary Leven
  • Lombardo Family Scholarship—established by Russell L. and Pamela S. Lombardo
  • Dr. Gerry Fritz Madden Memorial Scholarship—established by friends and family of Gerry Madden
  • Bryce L. Marks Scholarship—established by Bryce Marks
  • Patricia A. Martin Nursing Scholarship – established by the Martin family
  • James M. McDonough Family Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Richard E. McDowell Biology Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Norma Jean McLaughlin Memorial Scholarship—established by the National Associaiton of Purchasing Managers of the Twin Tiers
  • McKean County Medical Society Pre-Med Scholarship—established by the McKean County Medical Society
  • Dr. Edwin J. Medden Scholarship—established by Michael J. and Cathleen C. Medden and Gregory A. and Mary M. Huber
  • Miles-to-Go-Fund— established by Friends and Alumni in honorof Madeline Miles
  • Susan Mitchell Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. J. Michael Mitchell
  • Dean Moser Memorial Scholarship—established by Dean and Berniece Moser
  • Dr. Rebecca J. Mowrey Excellence in Sports Studies Scholarship Fund—established by Dr. Rebecca J. Mowrey, Rev. Drs. James D. and Thelma N. Mowrey and Dr. Holly J. Spittle
  • National Association of Purchasing Managers of Twin Tiers Scholarship Fund—established by the National Association of Purchasing Managers of Twin Tiers
  • Robert A. and Ann Diehm Newcombe Scholarship—established by the Newcombe Family
  • Tom and Edith O'Hargan Scholarship—established by James and Susan O'Hargan
  • Rhea O'Kain Memorial Scholarship—established by Mary Joan Muth
  • Mary K. O'Mara and Florine Young Scholarship—established by James E. O'Mara and Dr. Kimberly S. Young
  • Esther Ostrum Memorial Nursing Scholarship—established by Shirley J. Ostrum
  • Pantuso Family Scholarship—established by Mr. Peter J. Pantuso
  • Frank and Margaret Pantuso Mongillo Scholarship Fund—established by an anonymous donor
  • Peace and Justice Student Scholarship, Internship, and Volunteer Service Fund—established by an anonymous donor
  • Penn York Oil and Gas Affiliates of Desk and Derrick Clubs Scholarship Fund established by The Penn York Oil and Gas Affiliates of Desk and Derrick Clubs
  • Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association/John W. Bryner Sr. Memorial Scholarship—established by the Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association
  • Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association/Samuel W. Gregg Jr. Memorial Scholarship—established by the Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association
  • Dr. Rudy Pfister and Dr. June Pfister Gray Scholarship—established by Richard D. Pfister
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Holly Appleman Humanities Scholarship—established by Holly Appleman
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Castagnino and Dilick Scholarship—established by Mr. Joseph F. Castagnino and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Castagnino
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Dennis Lowery Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Williams
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Dr. Janet McCauley Memorial Scholarship—established by the Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Fannin and Foerstner Scholarship—established by Timothy B. Fannin, Deborah A. Fannin and John R. Foerstner
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association Founder's Schlarship—established by Tom Williams and Alumni of Pitt-Bradford
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Frank and Mary Rizzo Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Rizzo
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Dave and Libby Robinson Scholarship—established by David R. and Elizabeth D. Robinson and alumni
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/Gregory and Susan Silvestri Scholarship for Human Services—established by Gregory E. and Susan H. Silvestri
  • Pitt-Bradford Nursing Alumni Association Scholarship—established by Pitt-Bradford Nursing Alumni Association, faculty, staff, friends, and alumni
  • Pitt-Bradford Faculty and Staff/Philo and Sarah Blaisdell Foundation Book Fund Award—established by Pitt-Bradford Pitt-Bradford Faculty and Staff Book Award and the Philo and Sarah Blaisdell Foundation
  • Pitt-Bradford Staff Association Scholarship—established by Pitt-Bradford staff
  • Prantner Memorial Scholarship—establish by an anonymous donor
  • James Rich Scholarship—created under the will of Margaret E. Rich
  • John Rumple Ross Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Taylor
  • Margaret Graham Scott Ross Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Taylor
  • Rotary Club of Bradford Endowed Scholarship—established by the Rotary Club of Bradford
  • John F. Salvucci Memorial Scholarship—established by Gene P. and Louise Salvucci
  • Siebert Family Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur J. Siebert
  • Sigma Lambda Chi Alumni Association Scholarship—established by Sigma Lambda Chi Alumni Association
  • Dr. Thomas Slivinski Memorial Scholarship—established by William Slivinski
  • SpKuLeHaS Scholarship—established by Dr. Dessie Kuster Severson an anonymous donor
  • Harry and Louise Stolz Scholarship—established by an anonymous donor
  • Edith A. Stuckart Study Abroad Scholarship—established by Dr. J. Michael Stuckart
  • Marion Kepler and Harry Steward Taylor Scholarship—established by Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Taylor
  • Theta Sigma Delta Scholarship—established by Theta Sigma Delta Sorority
  • United Refining Scholarship—established by United Refining Company
  • Zachary Vigliotta Memorial Scholarship—established by Mr. Pasquale Vigliotta
  • James and Marie Weaver Scholarship—established by Dr. Molly A. Weaver and Mary Waver Bennett
  • Weyerhaeuser Scholarship—established by Weyerhaeuser Industries Inc.
  • Women’s Literary Club English Scholarship—established by the Women's Literary Club
  • Woody’s "Goodys"The Woody and Pat Woodruff Scholarship—established by H.L. “Woody” and Patricia Woodruff
  • Daniel and Emily Zinsner Scholarship—established  by Daniel and Emily Zinsner
  • Zippo District Managers Scholarship Fund—established by Zippo District Managers
  • Zonta Club Scholarship—established by Zonta Club

 

Pending Scholarships (unendowed)

  • Cercone Frantz Family Scholarship—established by Dominic A. and Pat Frantz Cercone
  • Class of 2011 Scholarship— established by the Class of 2011
  • Colosimo Family Scholarship—established by Joseph and Heidi Colosimo
  • Violet L. Esch Scholarship— established by Richard and Lisa Esch
  • Ward and Lori Garner Scholarship— established by Ward and Lori Garner
  • The Foerstner Family Scholarship— established by John R. Foerstner
  • The Craig and Nancy Hartburg Family Scholarship— established by Craig A. and Nancy F. Hartburg
  • Kane Family Scholarship—established by Kenneth and Ann Kane
  • Ray and Kay Kohler Scholarship—established by John and Mim Kohler
  • Math Faculty Scholarship—established by Dr. Jacinth Maynard
  • The O'Connell Family Scholarship—established by R. Michael and Susan Carlson
  • The Pitt-Bradford 50th Anniversary Commenmorative Scholarship—established by Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Rizzo
  • Pitt-Bradford Alumni Association/John W. & Marie R. Seltzer Scholarship—established by John and Marie Seltzer
  • Larry "Rock 'n' Roll!!!" Schardt Scholarship—established by Dr. Lawrence Schardt
  • Dr. Dessie Severson Environmental Studies Scholarship—established by Dr. Dessie Kuster Severson
  • Dr. Holly J. Spittler Community Engagement Scholarship—established by Dr. Holly J. Spittler
  • Toni M. Thompson Memorial Labor Scholarship—established by Ryan and Tonya Ackley

Academic Scholarships—The following scholarships are merit based and are offered at entry to qualifying Pitt-Bradford students. All students are encouraged to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to find out about other sources of aid for which they may qualify.

Panther Scholarship for PA Students Living On-Campus

If you are a new, admitted freshman from Pennsylvania who plans to enroll full-time and live on campus you may be eligible to receive a Panther Scholarship.

You may be eligible for an award of $5,500 each year for up to four consecutive years if you:

  • Have a a cumulative high school GPA of at least 2.5 (with college prep course work)
  • And have an SAT* score of 930 or greater (ACT score of 20 or greater)

You may be eligible for an award of $6,000 each year for up to four consecutive years if you:

  • Have a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0
  • And have an SAT* score of 1150 or greater (ACT score of 26 or greater)

If you are a transfer student from Pennsylvania who plans to enroll full-time, you may be eligible to receive an award of $3,000 a year while you pursue your first undergraduate degree or for up to four consecutive years, whichever comes first, if you: 

  • Have a combined and cumulative college GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • And have already earned at least 24 credits

 

Panther Scholarship for PA Students Commuting

If you are a new, admitted freshman who plans to enroll full-time and commute you may be eligible to receive a Panther Scholarship.

You may be eligible to receive an annual award of $2,000 for up to four consecutive years if you:

  • Graduated from a high school in the university's six-county region in Pennsylvania -- Cameron, Elk, Forest, McKean, Potter or Warren Counties
  • Have a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0
  • And have an SAT* score of 1150 or greater (ACT score of 26 or greater)

If you are a transfer student from Pennsylvania who plans to enroll full-time and commute, you may be eligible to receive a Panther Scholarship.

You may be eligible to receive $1,000 per year while you pursue your first undergraduate degree or for up to four consecutive years, whichever comes first, if you:

  • Have a combined and cumulative college GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • Have earned at least 24 credits

 

Panther Scholarship for Out-of-State Students

If you are not a Pennsylvania resident, you may be eligible for a Panther Scholarship for Out-of-State Students. These scholarships are posted against out-of-state tuition only.

If you plan to live on campus, you may be eligible for a $11,500 scholarship if you:

  • Are a new, admitted freshman and plan to enroll full time
  • Have a high school GPA of at least 2.5 (with college prep course work)
  • Have a combined SAT* score of 930 or greater (ACT score of 20 or greater)

If you plan to commute, you may be eligible for a $8,000 Panther Scholarship for Out-of-State Students if you:

  • Are a new, admitted freshman and plan to enroll full time
  • Have a high school GPA of at least 2.5 (with college prep course work)
  • Have a combined SAT* score of 930 or greater (ACT score of 20 or greater)

If you are a transfer student, you may be eligible for a $9,500 Panther Scholarship for Out-of-State Students if you:

  • Plan to enroll full time
  • Have a combined and cumulative college transfer GPA of at least 2.5
  • Have earned at least 24 credits

This scholarship is awarded for up to four consecutive years or until you complete your bachelor's degree, whichever comes first. 

Each of the scholarships above can be awarded annually for up to four consecutive years as long as you maintain proper academic performance. 

 

International Student Scholarship

If you are an international student who plans to enroll full-time and live on campus, you may be eligible to receive an International Student Award of $8,000 per year for up to four consecutive years.

For freshmen to qualify, you need to meet all requirements of the University of Pittsburgh for international student admission and have a secondary school GPA of at least 2.5 (with college prep course work). Requirements include official SAT/ACT test scores, official TOEFL or IELTS scores and official transcripts with English Translation if necessary.

For transfer students to qualify, you need to meet all requirements of the University of Pittsburgh for international student admission and have a combined and cumulative university transfer GPA of 2.5 and 24 credits earned.

 

 

Other Scholarships Available to Pitt-Bradford Students

Students are encouraged to explore all opportunities for financial support in their local communities. Funding sources and agencies include civic groups, churches, charitable foundations, fraternal organizations, hospitals, unions, and businesses. Students who receive a scholarship or grant from a source other than federal or state government or Pitt-Bradford are required to report the award to the Office of Financial Aid. Students can send the office a written statement providing the information about the outside scholarship/grant or send a copy of the notification received from the organization that made the award. Pitt-Bradford is required by the federal government to monitor the total amount of financial aid each student receives from all sources to ensure the student’s total financial aid is limited to the demonstrated need and/or cost of education. The Web is a great place for free scholarship search services. For more information on outside scholarships we have created the following link:

http://www.upb.pitt.edu/outsidescholarships.aspx

Army ROTC Scholarships

The U.S. Army awards financial aid on a competitive basis to outstanding young men and women who are interested in a military career and who pursue a commission as an officer through a Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program while in college.

All Army ROTC scholarships pay up to $20,000 per year for tuition and fees; $600 per semester for books; and a tax-free subsistence allowance (ranging from $300 to $500 per month depending on academic level, for up to 10 months).

Students who enroll in the Army ROTC program as freshmen and sophomores may apply for two- and three-year scholarships, and all students who accept Army ROTC scholarships enter a contractual agreement with the Army.

Specific information is available through the Office of Student Affairs at Pitt-Bradford, or from the Department of Military Science, which has offices on the campus of nearby Saint Bonaventure University.

Additional Financing Options

You can pay your balance in full, or you can elect to participate in the payment plan option. The University offers a payment plan each semester for balances of $500 or more.  When you access your PittPay account to view your eBill there is a payment plan option on the menu. When you choose the Payment Plan option it will walk you through the steps to enroll. There is a nonrefundable fee charged each semester that you use the payment plan option.  You may contact Enrollment Services at (814) 362-7602 or upbacct@pitt.edu for more detailed information or view the Web information: www.upb.pitt.edu/paymentplan.aspx

 

Academic Guidelines for Financial Aid Eligibility

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard for Financial Aid -

The Office of Financial Aid is required by federal regulation to monitor student progress toward completion of a degree and/or certificate. Only those students enrolled in a degree seeking or teaching certificate program are eligible for financial aid. 

Financial aid regulations dictate that a student must demonstrate academic progress in order to continue to receive financial aid.  Aid agencies (like PHEAA for the Pennsylvania State Grant) are not aware of your academic progress when they determine your eligibility for grants.  An award letter from them only means that you are financially eligible; Pitt-Bradford is required to determine if you are also academically eligible.  For example, for PA State Grants, full-time students must complete 24 credits per academic year to be eligible for the PA State Grant in the upcoming year.  Please note that there are differences in the standards and procedures used for federal, Pennsylvania, and University aid programs.  It is possible that you could be eligible to receive aid from one source and not eligible for aid from another source.

The following qualitative and quantitative measures will be reviewed to determine good standing for continued financial aid eligibility:

  • College level grade point (Cumulative GPA)
  • College credits completed
  • Time frame needed to complete the degree

 Students, who have met the minimum cumulative credit and cumulative GPA requirements and have not exceeded the appropriate number of cumulative credits to complete their degree programs, as stated, are considered to have met satisfactory academic progress and are eligible for continued student assistance for the upcoming enrollment period.  The qualitative and quantitative measures used to judge financial aid academic progress are cumulative and include all periods of a student’s enrollment.  Even periods in which the student did not receive financial aid must be included. 

Special situations that fall outside this stated general policy regarding continued eligibility are subject to professional judgment appeal by the Director of Financial Aid.

Student Aid Programs Impacted by the Standard -

Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Work-Study, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loans, and most University aid.

This standard does not apply to: tuition remission for dependents of Pitt employees, some outside scholarships, state student incentive grants (i.e. PHEAA State Grants); state agencies awarding state grants establish their own academic standards.

 

 

Grade Point Average

To remain in good standing, Pitt-Bradford requires that all students maintain a CUM GPA of at least 1.5 after the first academic year and a CUM GPA of 2.0 or higher after the second and subsequent years. 

 

 

 

*Credits Earned

Progress is checked once per year after the spring term.  The Financial Aid Office compares the student’s cumulative credits attempted against the cumulative credits completed.  Students are expected to successfully complete all credits they enroll in for each term.  Sometimes unexpected events occur which may cause the student to not complete a class or classes.  Students must successfully complete 67% of their cumulative attempted credits.  For example, a junior that has completed 54 of 81 cumulative credits would still be making progress as they’ve completed at least 67% of their attempted classwork.  All credits for which a student is registered after the add/drop deadline each term will be included in attempted credits.  Successfully completed credits are those in which a student receives a grade of A, B, C, D, S, or P.  Conversely, I, G, NC, F, or W grades will be counted as no credits.

 

 

 

Timeframe Needed

 

Students must complete their degree within 150% of the published length of their program.  For financial aid purposes, a student enrolled in a program leading to the bachelor’s degree must complete the 120 required credits (121 for radiological science) within a maximum of 180 credits taken.  Likewise, a student enrolled in a program leading to an associate’s degree must complete the 60 required credits (69 for nursing) within a maximum of 90 credits taken.  Pace of completion requirements are specified and aligned with maximum timeframe permitted.  Pace = total credits completed divided by total credits attempted.  Once a student reaches the maximum number of credits, the student will need to appeal and explain why he/she has exceeded 150% timeframe limit and what their plan for completion is.

 

*Credits Earned

 

Grade of Incomplete

Credits for a course in which a student has received a grade of incomplete are considered as not successfully completed. When the incomplete grade becomes a letter grade, a reevaluation of the number of credits earned may be conducted to assess the student’s successful completion of the required number of credits. It is the student's responsibility to inform the Financial Aid Office of such a grade change.

Course Withdrawal

Courses dropped before the conclusion of the add/drop period each semester will not count as attempted credits.  Credits for a course from which a student has withdrawn are not considered as completed.  If, because of course withdrawal a student has not earned the minimum required credits, the student is considered as not having made satisfactory progress.

 

Remedial Courses with Credit

Aid is granted for a maximum of 30 credits of remedial work and credits earned are counted toward academic progress.

 

Repeated Courses

All grades and attempted credits will be counted toward academic progress and maximum available timeframe, even if only some of these credits appear on your transcript.  Please note: Federal regulation allows for financial aid to pay for one retake of any previously passed course.

 

Challenge/CLEP Credits

No aid is granted for credits which are earned by a student through a challenge/CLEP exam. However, credits earned in this manner will be included for the purpose of checking academic progress.

 

Consortium Agreement

Credits earned at another institution under a Consortium Agreement will be used to determine enrollment status for the awarding of federal financial aid. Such courses will be treated in the determination of academic progress as if they were transfer credits (ie. Credits count but GPA does not).

Transfer Credits

Transfer credits that are accepted toward a student’s educational program count as both attempted and complete credits.  Grades earned at other colleges are not included in the Pitt-Bradford GPA. Only the academic credit is transferred.

Summer

Summer will count as any other payment period or term.  Students are not automatically eligible for aid in the summer as a make-up period.  Academic progress for summer will be checked at the end of the next academic year, unless a student is on ‘probation’ or ‘academic plan.’

Special Note to Undergraduate Students

It normally takes 120 credits to obtain a bachelor’s degree. To graduate in four years, a student must enroll for a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Enrolling for 12 credits (minimum for full-time students) would extend graduation 1 to 1 ½ years.  There are some financial aid program limits that would make this last year difficult.  For example, PHEAA State Grant has a limit of 8 semesters (part-time is proportionately more).  Additionally, Panther Scholarships are limited to four (4) years.  It should be noted that students who have been reinstated after suspension are limited to a maximum of 13 credits their first semester back so they must plan accordingly.

Checking Progress

The Financial Aid Office evaluates academic progress after spring term.  If the student does not complete 67% of their cumulative coursework, maintain the appropriate cumulative GPA, and/or exceeds the maximum timeframe to complete their degree, the student is considered to be not making progress.

If satisfactory academic progress is not met, the student loses Title IV eligibility. 

Students will receive a letter and a copy of the policy from Pitt-Bradford Financial Aid Office which advises them if they have not achieved Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for federal financial aid purposes.

 

Students academically suspended or dismissed are automatically ineligible for further financial aid. Academic suspension appeals go to the Academic Affairs Office.

 

 Re-establishing Eligibility for Financial Aid

A student may re-establish eligibility for Title IV aid by paying for and passing credits and/or improving cumulative GPA that was lacking.  Once the student has resolved the deficiency, the student can notify the Financial Aid Office in writing that he/she would like to be re-evaluated for Title IV aid.

Alternatively, a student may also have grades posted for incomplete coursework or study abroad or have a grade changed.  In these cases, a student must complete an “Academic Progress Exception Form” and send a copy of his/her final transcript to the Financial Aid Office.  If coursework was completed outside the Pitt system, the student must include a copy of that grade transcript as well.  The deadline for submitting this exception form is October 15th following the initial year of unsatisfactory progress.

 

-- OR -- 

Written Appeal for Academic Progress

  • Appeals will be granted only in extreme circumstances due to events beyond the student’s control, such as – death of a student’s relative, injury or illness of student (see chart below).  If such a circumstance has occurred, the student should submit an appeal in writing, along with all required documentation. 

 

     Family Circumstances             Medical Concerns          Work Circumstances
  • Marriage Certificate
  • Birth Certificate
  • Divorce Papers
  • Court Documents
  • Police Reports
  • A copy of plane tickets
  • A copy of medical bills
  • Letter for Doctor:
    • Verifying illness
    • Verifying treatment
    • Supporting your ability to handle an academic course-load
  • Letter from Employer
    • Verifying unemployment
    • Verifying reduced hours
               Death           Emotional Concerns                   Accident
  • Death Certificate
  • Obituary
  • Memorial Service Bulletin
  • Letter from a counselor/therapist
    • Verifying treatment
    • Supporting your ability to handle an academic course-load
  • Original police report
  • Medical documentation
  • Car repair bills

 

 

Incomplete forms and requests without proper documentation will be automatically returned to the student for completion.   Appeal must include:

 

    • An explanation of why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress

                                                                              AND

 

    • what has changed that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation.

 

 

  • The completed appeal and the required documentation must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office.  The appeal form and the required documentation will then be forwarded to the Financial Aid Appeal Committee for review.  The decision of the Appeal Committee is final and may not be appealed.  Students will receive email notification of the committee’s decision. 
  • If an appeal is approved, the student is placed on “financial aid probation” status when it is assumed they can meet SAP within one (1) term and “financial aid academic plan” if the student is not able to get to a 2.0 and 67% in one (1) term, Title IV aid eligibility is reinstated for the next payment period or term (with possible requirements specified by the school).  If the student does not make satisfactory progress or meet requirements of the academic plan by the end of the next payment period or term, the student loses eligibility for Title IV aid again.

  

 

2nd or Subsequent Appeal

                  What happens if I am granted a first appeal and then fail to meet the requirements of the academic plan or probation?

  • If student appeals and is placed on academic probation or plan and does not meet the terms of the agreement, the student must complete six (6) credits that apply toward graduation on his/her own and obtain at least a 2.0 term GPA before the student can appeal for federal financial aid again. 
  • If GPA was also an issue and the student was placed on academic probation or plan and did not meet the terms of the agreement, student must obtain at least a 2.3 term GPA and complete six (6) credits that apply toward graduation on his/her own before the student can appeal for federal financial aid again.

 


Tuition, Fees, and Other Expenses

(These are actual costs for 2013–2014; costs normally increase each year.)

Note: Pitt-Bradford reserves the right to increase or revise tuition, room, board, and other charges without advance notice. Other course-specific fees (i.e., labs, nursing) may apply.

Full-Time Students (12 credits or more)*

 

The following are the costs for the two-term academic year (fall and spring) 2013-2014:

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

Out-of-

 

Resident

State

 

 

 

Tuition

$12,208

$22,812

Nursing Tuition

$15,640

$29,092

Room (double)

$5,092

$5,092

     

Meals (full plan)

$3,146

$3,146

Other meal plans (resident and commuter) are available: please see the office of Housing and Residence Life

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Fee

$350

$350

Activity Fee

$200

$200

Recreation Fee

$140

$140

Health Service Fee

$100

$100

Parking and Transportation Fee

$80

$80

 

 

 

*Undergraduate students registering for more than 18 credits are charged additional tuition beyond the flat fee on a per-credit basis

 

 

 

Part-Time Students (1–11 credits)**

 

Pennsylvania

Out-of-

 

Resident

State

Tuition

$508/credit

$950/credit

Nursing Tuition

$651/credit

$1,212/credit

Computer Fee

$200

$200

Recreation Fee

$30

$30

Activity Fee $30 $30
Parking and Transportation Fee $40 $40

 

 

 

**Students registered during the summer term and/or summer sessions will also be billed on a per-credit basis only, regardless of the number of credits taken.

 

Miscellaneous Fees:

Physical Education Fee: $35/course

Sciences lab fee: $35-$50/course

Nursing lab fee: $35-$75/course

Nursing Liability Insurance Fee: $12/year

Athletic Training Liability Insurance Fee: $12/year

Late payment fee: $50/ month (maximum of three per term)
Late Graduation Application Fee: $15

The following fees must be paid prior to initially enrolling:


Application fee: $45, submitted with the application for admission.
Tuition deposit: $100, guarantees matriculation in the incoming freshman class. It is nonrefundable and is credited as partial payment of tuition.
Housing reservation: $125, reserves on-campus housing. It is nonrefundable and is credited as partial payment of the first term room charge.
Orientation fee for new students: $90.

Title IV Refund Policy

Adjustments to tuition charges resulting from official resignations are based on the effective date of resignation and in accordance with the federally mandated calculation.

The calculation is based on the period of enrollment completed. That percentage is computed by dividing the total number of calendar days in the term into the number of calendar days completed, as of the date of student notification. The percentage of Title IV assistance to which the student is entitled (has “earned”) is equal to this percentage of the term completed up to 60 percent. If the resignation occurs after 60 percent of the term is completed, the percentage is equal to 100 percent.

The amount of Title IV aid that must be returned is based on the percentage of “unearned” aid. The percentage is computed by subtracting earned aid from 100 percent. The University is required to return the lesser of 1) the unearned aid percentage applied to institutional charges or 2) the unearned aid percentage applied to the total Title IV aid received.

The student is required to return the difference between the amount of unearned aid and the amount returned by the University. If the student (or parents in the case of PLUS loans) is required to return a portion or all of the loan proceeds, the calculated amount is to be repaid according to the loan’s terms. Students must return only half the amount of grant funds calculated.

Funds are returned to the following Title IV sources in order of priority:

  1. Unsubsidized FFEL loans
  2. Subsidized FFEL Loans
  3. Federal Perkins loans
  4. FFEL PLUS loans
  5. Federal Pell Grants
  6. Federal SEOG
  7. Other Title IV assistance for which a return of funds is required
  8. Other federal, state, private, or institutional financial assistance
  9. Student

Board

Board (meal plan) changes are prorated on a separate basis.

 

BRADFORD BULLETIN < Previous Page | Table of Contents | Next Page >

 Home | Top of Page | Revised 8/5/04 8:04 AM Pitt Home | Find People | Contact Us