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GERMAN

 

 

GER 0100 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 1
3 cr.

This course introduces German through the development of all four language skills--speaking, listening, reading, and writing and deals with culture as an integral part of each skill.

GE: Languages/Global

 
GER 0104 ELEMENTARY GERMAN 2
3 cr.
This course continues the introduction of the basic structure of German begun in Elementary German1. It emphasizes all four language skills--listening, reading, writing and deals with culture as an integral part of each skill. The language acquisition exercises are supplemented by an integrated and systematic presentation of grammar. GE: Languages/Global

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Contact: Wayne Brinda, Program Director

The University of Pittsburgh at Bradford offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Elementary Education, Health and Physical Education (K-12), Biology Education, Business Education (K-12), Chemistry Education, English Education, Environmental Education (K-12), Mathematics Education and Social Studies Education. Students interested in Social Studies Education may choose history/political science, psychology, sociology, economics, or human relations as the focus area. In order to apply for Pennsylvania Level I certification in any of the above areas, students must graduate from Pitt-Bradford with a 3.0 grade point average, possess both Child Abuse and Criminal clearances, and pass all required Praxis exams. Pitt-Bradford also offers programs for post-baccalaureate certification programs for students interested in PA certification in any of the areas noted above. Most education courses require a field component.

BS in Health and Physical Education (K-12) Degree Requirements

Course Requirements in the Major

All courses in the major must be completed with a C- or higher and a 3.0 grade point average must be maintained.

 

Course
Credits
HPRED 0180 Sport Safety Training
2
PEDC 0202 Lifeguarding
1
HPRED 0209 Personal Health and Wellness
3
HPRED 1306 Exercise Physiology
4
HPRED 1307 Principles of Coaching
3
HPRED 1308 Coaching Practicum
1
HPEDU 0101 Current Issues in Community Health
1
HPEDU 1300 Adaptive Physical Education
3
HPEDU 1310 Teaching Team Sports
3
HPEDU 1320 Teaching Health
2
HPEDU 1330 Motor Behavior
3
HPEDU 1335 Educational Movement Concepts
2
HPEDU 1340 Individual and Leisure Sports
2
HPEDU 1400 Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education
3
HPEDU 1451 Capstone
3
BIOL 0212 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
3
BIOL 0213 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
3
BIOL 0222 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab I
1
BIOL 0223 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab II
1
CHEM 0187 Drugs & Society
3
MATH 0098 Algebra II
3
MATH 0133 Statistics
4
EDUC 0204 Introduction to Education          3
EDUC 0215 English Language Learners
3
EDUC 0220 Special Education Law
3
EDUC 0235 Instructional Design
3
EDUC 1301 Instructional Technology
3
EDUC 1325 Development of Exceptional Children
3
EDUC 1345 Educational Theories and Practices
3

EDUC 1350

Educational Psychology and Measurement
3
EDUC 1481 Student Teaching
12

 

General Education Program Requirements and Requirements-Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Suggested Course of Study for BS in Health and Physical Education (K-12)

 

First Year
Credits
ENG 0101 English Comp I
3
MATH 0098 College Algebra II
3
EDUC 0204 Introduction to Education
3
FS 0102 Freshman Seminar
3
Arts and Letters Elective
3
HPEDU 0101 Current Issues in Community Health
1
ENG 0102 English Comp II
3
PSY 0101 Intro to Psych
3
MATH 0133 Statistics
4
EDUC 1301 Instructional Technology
3
HPRED 0209 Personal Health and Wellness
3
Arts and Letters Elective
3
Total Credits First Year
35

Second Year
Credits
BIOL 0212 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
3
BIOL 0222 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab I
1
Arts and Letters Elective
3
HPEDU 1405 Assessment in Health and Physical Education
3
PEDC 0202 Lifeguarding
1
HPRED 0204 First Aid/CPR
2
CHEM 0187 Drugs & Society (GE/Physical)
3
BIOL 0213 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
3
BIOL 0223 Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab II
1
HPEDU 1330 Motor Behavior
3
History, Cultural or Philosophy Inquiry elective
3
EDUC 1350 Educational Psychology and Measurement
3
Behavioral, Economics and Political Science elective
3
EDUC 0210 Education Lab I
1
Total Credits Second Year
33

Third Year
Credits
HPRED 1306 Exercise Physiology
4
HPEDU 1300 Adaptive Physical Education
3
HPEDU 1305 Teaching Leisure Sports
1
HPEDU 1310 Teaching Team Sports
3
History, Cultural or Philosophy Inquiry Elective
3
HPRED 1307 Principles of Coaching
3
HPRED 1305 Biomechanics
3
HPEDU 1315 Teaching Individual Sports
1
HPRED 0180 Sport Safety Training
2
EDUC 1310 Education Lab II
1
History, Cultural or Philosophy Inquiry Elective
3
HPEDU 1320 Teaching Health
2
EDUC 1325 Development of Exceptional Children
3
Total Credits Third Year
35

Forth Year
Credits
EDUC 1410 Education Lab III
1
HPEDU 1325 Teaching Dance
1
Behavioral, Economics and Political Science Elective
3
HPRED 1308 Coaching Practicum
1
HPEDU 1400 Methods of Teaching Health and PE
3
HPEDU 1451 Capstone in H/PE (ULW)
3
EDUC 1481 Student Teaching
12
Total Credits Forth Year
27
Total Credits For Program
129

Course Descriptions

 

HPEDU 0101 CURRENT ISSUES IN COMMUNITY HEALTH
1 cr.
This course will provide an introduction to current perspectives and research findings about health problems that face individuals and communities. The focus will be primarily on population-based and prevention-oriented issues. The role of government and non-governmental agencies in terms of community health will also be explored. Current issues and future challenges facing community health in our country and world will be emphasized.

 

HPEDU 0102 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE SCIENCE
3cr.

This course introduces students to the field of exercise science and the evolution of the profession. Opportunities are provided to identify characteristics of exercise science professionals, diverse perspectives, and current trends in the field. Emphasis is placed on career planning and employment opportunities.

 


HPEDU 1300 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
3 cr.
This course will provide an understanding of the nature, behavioral characteristics and motor limitations of various exceptionalities. It will also provide the student with the skills needed to prepare meaningful individualized movement experiences for individuals with special needs. Prerequisites: Admission to Health and Physical Education Certification Program.

HPEDU 1305 TEACHING LEISURE SPORTS
1 cr.
This course will provide students with the rules, safety measures, etiquette, strategies, and techniques of various leisure activities. The students will learn how to develop lesson plans and teaching techniques focused on physical activities that can be pursued throughout the lifespan.

HPEDU 1310 TEACHING TEAM SPORTS
3 cr.
This course will cover the theory and practice of teaching and coaching team sports. The skills and content of a wide variety of team sports will be covered. Students will be expected to participate in related physical activity and in simulated/clinical teaching requirements.

HPEDU 1315 TEACHING INDIVIDUAL SPORTS
1 cr.
This course will cover the theory and practice of teaching and coaching individual sports, including golf, tennis, track and field.

HPEDU 1320 TEACHING HEALTH
2 cr.
This course will cover the foundations of health promotion. A survey of health promotion concepts is covered, as well as issues related to the theory and practice of health promotion. Models of health behavior are utilized. Controversial issues in the field of health promotion are also discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to Health and Physical Education Certification Program.

HPEDU 1325 TEACHING DANCE
1 cr.
This course will cover the principles and techniques of teaching various types of dance. Both theory and practical experience will be combined to provide the appropriate pedagogical knowledge and skills. Students will create and carry out learning experiences in dance that are appropriate for students of various ages.

HPEDU 1330 MOTOR BEHAVIOR
3 cr.
This course investigates the sequence of development of fundamental motor patterns and perceptual motor skills, factors influencing this development, assessment and evaluation, and methods and activities for developing these skills. Prerequisites: PSY 0101 and Sophomore status.

 

HPEDU 1335 EDUCATIONAL MOVEMENT CONCEPTS
2 cr.

This course helps students achieve individual competency in the fundamental areas of educational gymnastics, educational games, and educational/creative dance through the constructivist use of cooperative learning, problem solving, and guided discovery.  Students in this course will apply educational movement concepts to developmentally appropriate interdisciplinary educational games using peer collaboration in problem solving, application of class information in class lab projects, and post-lesson reflections.  Students will also apply movement concepts to academic learning using brain-based learning research, action-based learning and inclusion movement experiences for the pre-K & elementary-level child.

 

HPEDU 1340 INDIVIDUAL AND LEISURE SPORTS
2 cr.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the games and skills associated with a variety of target activities including, but not limited to golf, pool, ping-pong, pickle ball, bowling and archery.  Emphasis will be placed on planning and applying developmentally appropriate activities for diverse learners.  This is a theory and technique course.

 

HPEDU 1400 METHODS OF TEACHING HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
3 cr.
This course will cover curriculum planning and the methods of instruction for teaching personal and community health and physical education in elementary and secondary schools. The needs of special populations will also be addressed. Prerequisites: Admission to Health and Physical Education Certification Program.

HPEDU 1405 ASSESSMENT IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to evaluation in health and physical education. Emphasis will be placed on sports skills tests and measurement of physical fitness and motor abilities. Some emphasis will be placed on program evaluation and written tests appropriate to health and physical education, as well as statistical methods of evaluation. Prerequisites: MATH 0133, or ECON 0204, or PSY 0201, and junior standing.

HPEDU 1451 CAPSTONE
3 cr.
This course provides a critical perspective of how theoretical concepts and integrated knowledge can be applied to the teaching of physical education. Emphasis in on a coherent understanding of the interrelationships that exist in the sub-disciplines of physical education and other subject areas. Prerequisites: Admission to Health and Physical Education Certification Program.

 

HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE

Contact: Professor Richard Frederick, Program Director

Major in History/Political Science

The history/political science major offers students a foundation in two disciplines that study the institutions, the processes, the people, and the ideas and cultures that have shaped the United States and other countries. The study of history and political science develops insight into current affairs and into the possibilities and limitations of individual and public action.

The major prepares students for careers in journalism, teaching, or government service and for graduate study in business, history, law, political science, or public administration.

Secondary teacher certification in social studies is available with the BA degree in history/political science.

 

BA in History/Political Science Degree Requirements

Course Requirements in the Major

HIST 0106
and 0107 U.S. History I and II
6
HIST 1451 Capstone: History
or
PS 1451 Capstone: Political Science
3
__
9
Area Requirements in History

Two of the following courses:
6
HIST 0103 Europe in the 18th Century
HIST 0104 Europe in the 19th Century
HIST 0105 Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 0108 Medieval Europe
HIST 0109 Renaissance/Reformation Europe
History electives (three courses, including at
least two at the 1300 level or above)
9
__
Total additional credits in history
15
Area Requirements in Political Science

Seven courses, including at least one course from each of the four sets of courses representing the four areas of study in political science, including at least two at the 1300/1400 level or above:

American Government and Politics
PS 0102 American Political Process
PS 0204 Public Policy
PS 0205 Law and the Courts
PS 0207 Congress and the Presidency
PS 0209 Environmental Politics
PS 1310 Constitutional Law
PS 1319 Political Parties and Interest Groups

Comparative Government and Politics
PS 0103 Comparative Politics
PS 0220 Media and Internet in Politics
PS 1340 Democratization
PS 1337 Identity Politics
PS 1355 Politics of the Developing World

International Politics
PS 0110 Introduction to International Affairs
PS 0201 World Politics
PS 0215 European Politics and the European Union
PS 1304 American Foreign Relations
PS 1365 Social Movements
PS 1385 Global Environmental Politics

Political Theory
PS 0202 Great Political Thinkers
PS 1307 Liberalism, Conservatism, and Socialism
PS 1308 American Political Thought
Total additional credits in political science
21
__
Total credits required for the major
45

 


General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Suggested Course of Study
BA in History/Political Science

First Year
HIST 0106
and 0107 U.S. History I and II
6
ENG 0101
and 0102 English Composition I and II
6
MATH 0110 Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Political science courses
6
General education or elective courses
9
__
30
Second Year
History courses
6
Political science courses
6
General education or elective courses
18
__
30
Third Year
History course
3
Political science course
3
General education or elective courses
24
__
30
Fourth Year
History course
3
Political science course
3
General education or elective course
21
HIST 1451 Capstone: History
or
PS 1451 Capstone: Political Science 3
__
30

Students seeking secondary teacher certification in social studies should meet with the director of teacher education each semester to plan out their course of study. Please refer to the section on Education Programs for further details.

Minor in History

Students who major in any discipline other that history/political science may earn a minor in history by completing the following requirements:

 

American or European History

HIST 0106
and 0107 U.S. History I and II
or
Two of the following courses:
HIST 0103 Europe in the 18th Century
HIST 0104 Europe in the 19th Century
HIST 0105 Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 0108 Medieval Europe
HIST 0109 Renaissance/Reformation Europe
6
Three history electives (at least two at the
1300 level or above)
9
__
15

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 


History Course Descriptions

See also courses under Political Science.

 

HIST 0103 EUROPE IN THE 18TH CENTURY
3 cr.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times; it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness; it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity; it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness. There was a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face on the throne of England; there was a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of state, preservers of loaves, and fishes that things in general were settled forever. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0104 EUROPE IN THE 19TH CENTURY
3 cr.
Nineteenth-century Europe was produced by Napoleon, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, Nietzsche, Otto von Bismarck, and Sigmund Freud—small man, monkey man, bearded man, weird man, blood and iron man, and shrink man. These are discussed in the appropriate setting. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0105 EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY
3 cr.

Europe on the eve of WWI is presented to show how it was drawn into the conflict; the war is discussed and the Treaty of Versailles is closely examined to discover if later European developments were directly traceable to that treaty. England and France are studied to see why appeasement (1938) was their only solution to international pressure. The rise of fascism in Italy, Germany, and Spain and the establishment of communism in Russia are also discussed. The course ends with the outbreak of WWII. GE: History/Euro-American

 

 

HIST 0106 U.S. HISTORY I
3 cr.
A survey of U.S. history from the Age of Discovery to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis is on the causes of the American Revolution, the political and geographic development of the nation, and the nature of the sectional and economic differences that led to the Civil War. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0107 U.S. HISTORY II
3 cr.
America from Reconstruction to the present. Major topics include the development of the West, urban and industrial development, the rise of America to world power, and the development of major political and socioeconomic institutions. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0108 MEDIEVAL EUROPE
3 cr.

The Middle Ages was more than knights and castles, swains and serfs. It was a period of power grabbing on a titanic scale—popes, emperors, kings, princes, cardinals, archbishops, mistresses, poisons, and intrigues galore. In the end, modern Europe, as we know it, was emerging. GE: History/Euro-American



 

HIST 0109 RENAISSANCE/REFORMATION EUROPE
3 cr.
Machiavelli, Da Vinci, Erasmus, Duerer, Palestrina, Copernicus, Titian, Michelangelo, Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Henry VIII, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Charles V, Elizabeth I (Good Queen Bess), Henry IV (“old chicken pot”) of France, Columbus, Cabot, Diaz, Charles I (and his head), Savonarola (and his stake), Charles II (and his brood of 365+). GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0202 WORLD WAR I
3 cr.

The 1918 Armistice which ended World War I failed to give concrete victory to either side. The Treaty of Versailles not only failed to resolve the issues, but proceeded to compound the problem by adding new injustices to old ones. The “Twenty-Year Truce” between the wars is usually studied in an attempt to understand the rise of Hitler, Hitler’s redress of the Versailles Treaty, and all that followed. It is imperative to understand the causes which enveloped the world in the First World War, the course of the war and all developments which led to that infamous treaty. This course will endeavor to expose all these issues for a better understanding of the First World War and all that followed. GE: History/Euro-American


HIST 0203 RADICALISM IN THE UNITED STATES
3 cr.
Probes the origins of radical discontent in America from colonial times to the New Left and student movements of the 1960s. Particular emphasis will be placed upon pre-Marxian utopian socialism, the Marxian socialist movement around 1900, socialist developments within the labor movement, and the history of the Communist Party of the United States. Revolutionary tactics, major historical events, and ideologies receive approximately equal coverage. Assignments illustrate particular radical viewpoints. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 0204 THE GREAT WAR
3 cr.
World War II is often seen as a continuation of the unresolved conflict of the 1914-18 war. The 1918 armistice that ended World War I failed to give a concrete victory to either side. The Treaty of Versailles not only failed to resolve the issues, but compounded the problem by adding new injustices to the old ones. This course examines the origins, the outbreak, and the course of World War I to understand more clearly the Versailles Treaty and subsequent events. GE: History/Euro-American

 

HIST 0205 THE U.S. IN THE 1930S: SOCIAL HISTORY THROUGH HOLLYWOOD FILM
3 cr.

A detailed study of social thought in the 1930s particularly relating to the influence of economic and social trends on mass culture. Approximately 12 American commercial films of various genres will be shown, along with selected readings from the period. These are used as an illustration of political, moral, and social thought during the period of America's Great Depression. GE: History

 


HIST 0206 WORLD WAR II
3 cr.

WWI and WWII are increasingly being viewed as one conflict interrupted by a 20-year truce. The view of many is that the issues of 1914 were never fully resolved by the war and further complicated by the 1919 settlement. The shortcomings of 1919 grew increasingly obvious as the 1920s and 1930s progressed. Events seemed to draw the world inextricably toward September 1, 1939. WWII is discussed in the global context in which it was fought, but concentrates on the European theater. The course ends with Potsdam 1945. GE: History/Euro-American


HIST 0208 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY
3 cr.
Traces the African American experiences from colonial times through the modern civil rights era. Although the primary emphasis is on history, consideration is also given to various facets of African American culture, particularly literature. GE: History/Euro-American
 
HIST 0215 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
3 cr.

The course will examine environmentalism in a broad historical sense, from colonial notions about the environment to the present. Topics will include American conceptions of nature, changes in the use of land and other resources, urban and rural environments, and the conservation movements designed to preserve parts of the American landscape and resources therein. GE: History

 
HIST 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in history.

HIST 1301 TUDOR ENGLAND
3 cr.
On Bosworth Field mediaeval England died and modern England was born. The dynasty ushered in was that of the Tudors, and the Tudor years for England were Renaissance and Reformation years. By the end of the dynasty, these forces were spent, but by then, they had shaped the fundamental political, social, economic and religious ideas associated with modern Britain. This course will investigate these developments. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1302 STUART ENGLAND
3 cr.
The constitutional, religious, cultural, and social crises of Stuart times paved the way for British expansion and major power status in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. These crises are the major concentration of this course. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1303 BRITAIN UNDER THE HANOVERIANS
3 cr.
Presents the evolution of constitutional monarchy/oligarchy in 18th-century Britain to the constitutional monarchy/democracy in 19th century Britain. The development of responsible ministry under the Georges is discussed. The international complications of the 18th-century diplomatic wars and the effects of the French Revolution upon Britain are also discussed. The Industrial Revolution and the rise of “new” economic imperialism conclude the course with the coming of WWI. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1304 VICTORIAN ENGLAND
3 cr.
Great Expectations was the title Charles Dickens chose to open the Victorian era. H.G. Wells ended the era with The War of the Worlds. Between the two lies a period worth investigating; they were times that broadened horizons beyond Victorian recognition. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1305 POST-VICTORIAN ENGLAND
3 cr.
England during the Victorian era was the leading industrial, political, and Great Power on the European scene. Her economic preponderance and political system were the envy of the world. Twentieth-century Europe witnessed an end to “Pax Britannica,” and Britain’s economic superiority was inexorably cast away. England became a second, third-rate power. America in the late 20th century might learn much to guide her as her industrial preponderance and “Pax Americana” is challenged. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1306 GERMANY FROM 1640
3 cr.
In this course, the emergence of a united Germany is traced from the confusion of medieval particularism and the disaster wrought by the religious wars of the 16th and 17th centuries. The rise of Prussia under Frederick Wilhelm the Great Elector, French chauvinistic imperialism, the advent of Otto von Bismarck, the Bismarckian Empire’s weaknesses, the First World War, and the rise of Adolph Hitler are studied. The course ends with the disappearance of a united Germany in 1945. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1307 FRANCE SINCE 1789
3 cr.
This course concentrates on France since 1789. The Revolution, the Empire, the Restoration, the July Monarchy, the Second Republic, Second Empire, Third Republic, WWI, France between the wars, WWII, Vichy France, the Fourth and finally the Fifth Republic are dealt with in this study. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1308 ITALY SINCE 1495
3 cr.
Just because Columbus left in 1492, Italy did not fall apart. It wasn't, however, able to put itself together for a long time. When it finally did, it went too far: Mussolini. Is contemporary Italy the right reaction to Mussolini? In this course, explanations are explored. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1309 MODERN RUSSIA: TSARS, BOMBS, AND COMMUNISTS
3 cr.
Covers the period of Romanov rule from 1613–1917; deals with the establishment of autocracy in Russia and Russia’s movement toward westernization and industrialization. The reform of Peter the Great, the Enlightenment of Catherine the Great, the reaction of Nicholas I, the liberalism of Alexander II, and the demise of Nicholas II are discussed, along with Russian foreign policy. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1310 EAST ASIA: CHINA, KOREA, JAPAN
3 cr.
The aim of this course is to survey the historical development of China, Japan, and Korea in their “classic” times. The first half of the course surveys these areas from the prehistoric era to the intrusion of the West in modern times. The second half is devoted to the impact of Western intrusion upon these cultures and their metamorphosis—either real or imagined—caused by it. The course concludes in the period between the World Wars. GE: History/Non-Western and Global

HIST 1311 AMERICAN COLONIES TO 1763
3 cr.
A survey of colonial America emphasizing the role of the colonies in the British Empire and the social, economic, intellectual, and political factors that influenced later American history. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1312 AMERICAN REVOLUTION
3 cr.
The American “Revolution” is usually seen as an island entire unto itself—the outpouring of a spirit of liberty against an oppressive monarchy. It is, however, an integral part of the workings of larger 18th-century intellectual, commercial, and diplomatic activities. The events of Europe and America do interlock (whatever George Washington may have said to the contrary). In this course, the war for American independence is discussed in the European context; the American Revolution will be discussed in the North American context. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1316 AMERICA BETWEEN THE WARS, 1917–1941
3 cr.
An in-depth study of the United States in World War I and the interwar period. Major topics include the diplomatic events preceding the World Wars, ballyhoo and reality in the 1920s, causes and effects of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the New Deal. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1317 CONTEMPORARY U.S. HISTORY, 1941–PRESENT
3 cr.
Major events and trends of the post-World War II era, including the war and its aftermath, the onset of the Cold War, and the domestic and foreign policies of presidential administrations from Truman are discussed. Some major problems, such as urban decay and civil rights for minorities, are considered in the context of the period. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1318 ANCIENT GREECE
3 cr.
The first half of this course traces man from the caves to the pyramids, to the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and the Minotaur of Crete. The second half of the course moves from Troy to Periclean Athens and Sparta of Leonidas—Marathon, Thermopylae are precursors to Alexander the Great with whom this course ends. GE: History/Euro-American.

HIST 1319 ANCIENT ROME
3 cr.
The first half of Roman history traces Rome from Romulus and Remus (and the she-wolf) through the forty stabs of Caesar—the Republic shall succumb to a surfeit of Gracci, Mariuses, Sullas, Pompeys, and the like. The second half (the imperial one) succumbs to one-too-many orgies, poisonings, lions, and Christians and Germanic invasions from the North. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1320 EARLY AMERICAN NATION 1789–1840
3 cr.
This course is a study of the rise of American political and constitutional institutions. Special emphasis is given to the emergence of political parties, economic policies, the democratic implications of the Age of Jackson, and the origin of issues leading to the Civil War. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1321 THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION
3 cr.

America in the years leading to the Civil War, the war, and the period of Reconstruction are discussed. The full gamut of the social, economic, psychological, constitutional, and political factors are considered. GE: History/Euro-American


 

HIST 1322 RISE OF URBAN AMERICA 1877–1917
3 cr.
An in-depth study that will include the Industrial Revolution in the United States; the impact of mining, cattle, and agriculture “frontiers” on American business; the politics of the Gilded Age; immigration; the Spanish-American War and the emergence of the U.S. as a world power; the Populist Movement; and the Progressive Era. GE: History/Euro-American

HIST 1324 ANCIENT EGYPT
3 cr.
Egypt was one of the earliest cradles of civilization. The country’s political, social, philosophical, and religious contributions profoundly shaped and influenced the emerging Mediterranean world that we have become accustomed to refer to as the ancient world. Through the millennia that transpired, Egypt passed through its predynastic, old kingdom, feudal age, middle kingdom, hyksos intrusion, new kingdom, late pharaonic period, Assyrian conquest, Persian period, Alexandrian liberation, Ptolemaic, and Roman and Byzantine periods before the curtain was closed on ancient world. GE: History/Non-Western and Global

HIST 1450 TOPICS IN HISTORY
3 cr.
An advanced study of a special topic in history. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

HIST 1451 CAPSTONE: HISTORY
3 cr.
This course will include discussions of historical research methods, the importance of historical context, and fallacies of historical writing as a prelude to the study of a specific historical theme, period, or event. Students will present group research efforts on selected topics; in addition, each student will complete a research paper on a topic related to the theme of the course. GE: Capstone

HIST 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: HISTORY
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of history. Permission of the instructor is required.


 

HIST 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH:HISTORY
1-3 cr.

Independent research on a project in history. Prerequisite: permission of instructor


 

HIST 1499 INTERNSHIP IN HISTORY
1-6 cr.
Practical experience in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

Contact: Jennifer Forney, Program Director

Major in Hospitality Management

The hospitality management major consists of a 121 to 122 credit curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. Consistent with the overall mission of the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, the hospitality management major includes a liberal arts core curriculum, much of which is taken during the first two years of study. Hospitality management majors also take required foundation courses across the fundamental areas of the industry


 

Courses Within the Major
Credit Hours
MGMT 0110
Principles of Management
3
ECON 0103
Introduction to Macroeconomics
3
MIS 0103
Microcomputing for Management
3
HMGT 0101
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
HMGT 0201
Service Industry Structure and Leadership
3
MGMT 1320
Human Resource Management
3
HMGT 0210
Legal Issues in the Hospitality and Tourism Industry
3
HMGT 0220
Foodservice Management
3
ACCT 0201
Financial Accounting Concepts
3
ACCT 0202
Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
HMGT 1310
Hotel Operations
3
HMGT 1320
Hospitality Information Systems
3
FIN 1301
Corporate Finance
3
MRKT 1301
Principles of Marketing
3
HMGT 1330 Principles of Food Preparation (Includes Lab) 4
HMGT 1340 Food and Beverage Cost Control 3

HMGT 1370

Hospitality and Tourism Marketing

3
HMGT 1451
Senior Seminar for Hospitality Majors (Capstone Requirement, Upper Level Writing Requirement)
__3
58

 

Other required courses

 

MATH 0098
College Algebra II (Math Requirement)
3
ECON 0112
Tourism (1 Economics Requirement)
3
MATH 0133
Statistics (Computational Science)
__4
10
Electives
9
Total Credits Hours
77

 

Possible Elective Courses

 

HMGT 1350
Foodservice Purchasing
3
HMGT 1360
Contemporary Leisure and Recreation
3
HMGT 1380
Special Events Planning
3
HMGT 1410
Analytical Methods for Hospitality Planning
3
HMGT 1430 Commercial Food Preparation and Menu Planning 3
HMGT 1440
Tourism Destination—Strategic Planning and Development
3
HMGT 1445
Professionalism in Hospitality
3

Sequencing of Courses


 

Year 1
ENG 0101 and 0102
English Composition I and II
6
HMGT 0101
Introduction to Hospitality Management
3
ECON 0112
Tourism
3
ECON 0103
Introduction to Macroeconomics
3
MIS 0103
Microcomputing for Management
3
MGMT 0110 Principles of Management 3
MATH 0098
College Algebra II
or
MATH 0136
Applied Calculus
3–4
MATH 0133
Statistics
4
General Education or Electives
__6
31
Year 2
MATH 0133 Statistics 3
HMGT 0201
Service Industry Structure and Leadership
3
MGMT 1320
Human Resource Management
3
HMGT 0210
Legal Issues in the Hospitality and Tourism Industry
3
HMGT 0220
Foodservice Management
3
HMGT 1310 Hotel Operations 3
ACCT 0201
Financial Accounting Concepts
3
ACCT 0202
Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
General Education or Electives
__6
30
Year 3
HMGT 1330
Principles of Food Preparation
3
HMGT 1340 Food & Beverage Cost Control 3
HMGT 1370 Hospitality & Tourism Marketing 3
FIN 1301
Corporate Finance
3
MRKT 1301
Principles of Marketing
3
HMGT 1320
Hospitality Information Systems
3
Hospitality Electives
9
General Education or Electives
9
Year 4
HMGT 1451
Senior Seminar for Hospitality Majors
3
Hospitality Electives
6
General Education or Electives
18
General Education Electives
27
Total Credit Hours
121–122

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Hospitality Management Course Descriptions


HMGT 0101 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
The course serves as an introduction for the student to the tremendous diversity of the hospitality and tourism industry. The industry will be disaggregated into its component parts with subsequent discussions of the role that each plays. Emphasis will be placed upon the hotel, restaurant and foodservice industries. Tourism will be explored as to its role in shaping these tangible industries

HMGT 0201 SERVICE INDUSTRY STRUCTURE AND LEADERSHIP
3 cr.
Successful leadership as channeled through an organizational structure is a very critical concept in the service industries where the customer is usually present at the point of production of the product. This course will review both the content of structure and leadership as well as the process of utilizing them to successfully direct an organization to its objectives.

HMGT 0210 LEGAL ISSUES IN THE HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM INDUSTRY
3 cr.
An investigation of the legal issues and responsibilities in the selling of hospitality and travel services to the general public. The various seller/purchaser legal relationships and resultant liabilities will be reviewed. Extensive use of case studies and actual case histories will be presented and their subsequent impact on the industry will be discussed. Prerequisite: HMGT 0101 Introduction to Hospitality Management

HMGT 0220 FOODSERVICE MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

Foodservice systems will be explored through examining the component parts of a typical foodservice operation. This component parts include: management and organization, procurement, production, distribution, service, maintenance, and sanitation. The course will also explore modern trends in foodservice/restaurant management. All students will be required to sit for the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification exam and preparation for upper level food courses. This course is a prerequisite to take HMGT 1330 Principles of Food Prep. Additionally, you will have to pass the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification exam. Prerequisites: HMGT 0101 Introduction to Hospitality Management.


HMGT 1310 HOTEL OPERATIONS
3 cr.
Focuses upon the areas of housekeeping, front office, hotel security and engineering. The course explores the interrelationships that exist between these functional areas and how these relationships ultimately support the customer service and profit expectations of the hotel. An emphasis will be placed upon the manner in which these areas must cooperate to attain these broad organizational goals. Prerequisites: HMGT 0101 Introduction to Hospitality Management

HMGT 1320 HOSPITALITY INFORMATION SYSTEMS
3 cr.
This course will introduce students to hospitality information systems, including property management systems, restaurant management systems, meeting management, club management, and communication networks. Prerequisites : MIS 0103 Microcomputing for Management

HMGT 1330 PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PREPARATION
4 cr.

A study of the various foods, production principles, cooking methods, food storage and equipment utilized in food preparation. Includes both lab and classroom learning opportunities. The classroom component provides the theoretical basis of food types and production processes that will then be demonstrated and experimented with in the lab environment. Requires the purchase of professional uniform and some supplies. Prerequisites: HMGT 0220 Foodservice Management and have passed the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Protection Manager certification exam.


HMGT 1340 FOOD AND BEVERAGE COST CONTROL
3 cr.
This course emphasizes the theories and techniques that are commonly used in the restaurant industry for controlling food and beverage costs. It emphasizes how controllers, and managers can use these approaches to successfully measure and control food and beverage output. The course will present theories and techniques which will then be applied to a real world context. Prerequisites: HMGT 0220 Foodservice Management, ACCT 0202

HMGT 1350 FOODSERVICE PURCHASING
3 cr.
We will explore the flow of operations as it applies to the purchasing of foodservice commodities. Issue covered will include: standards, specifications, policies and procedures for the purchasing of both foodstuffs and nonfood supplies. Prerequisites: HMGT 0220 Foodservice Management

HMGT 1360 CONTEMPORARY LEISURE AND RECREATION
3 cr.
Leisure and recreation has become an important activity in the American cultural landscape. This course will explore the concept of "Leisure" from both a psychological a philosophical and a sociological perspective. The forces that shape recreational behavior, along with the historical development of leisure/recreation will be covered. Students will be exposed to the planning and organizing activities associated with these activities. Prerequisite: HMGT 0101 Introduction to Hospitality Management

HMGT 1370 HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MARKETING
3 cr.
This course will help students appreciate, develop, and manage marketing in the hospitality and travel industry sectors. The course will introduce basic concepts and skills in tourism marketing, and will address differences between tourism and other industries. Students will learn how marketing managers can position their products or destinations to capture customers. Prerequisites: MRKT 1301 Principles of Marketing

HMGT 1380 SPECIAL EVENTS PLANNING
3 cr.
This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing and implementing large scale community events. Prerequisites: MRKT 1301 Principles of Marketing

HMGT 1410 ANALYTICAL METHODS OF HOSPITALITY PLANNING
3 cr.
Historically, many hotel and restaurant managers make critical decisions by utilizing purely qualitative means, when in fact more powerful quantitative tools exist. The course will apply advanced decision-making methodologies drawn from a wide range of disciplines to common operational situations faced by the hospitality operator. Topics such as budgeting, pricing the product, evaluating the success of various advertising media, causal relationships between room sales and food sales are some of many topics explored. A computer simulation game will be used to allow students to apply theory to a real world situation. Prerequisites: MATH 0133, ACCT 0201 AND ACCT 0202

HMGT 1420 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
The course is a capstone course designed to allow the student to apply all knowledge gained throughout this course and previous courses and through actual work experience to a series of hotel and restaurant related case studies. Through the use of case studies, the student will learn to identify existing business and/or corporate strategy, evaluate its suitability given the competitive environment and effectively modify or change it. Emphasis will be placed on strategic considerations as a guide to management actions at all levels of the organization. Prerequisites: Senior Standing

HMGT 1430 COMMERCIAL FOOD PREPARATION AND MENU PLANNING
3 cr.
The complex processes of successfully planning, producing and serving meals to customers in a commercial restaurant setting will be identified. The course will focus upon the multi-faceted issues involved in planning and executing a menu. The relationships between menu planning and all other commercial restaurant functions will be explored. The course will culminate in student groups planning and executing a series of meals for guests. Prerequisites: HMGT 1330 Principles of Food Preparation

HMGT 1440 TOURISM DESTINATION—STRATEGIC PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
3 cr.
This course will explore how we perform the planning role in the development of facilities and destinations for the traveling public. The course will look at traditional planning and development methodologies and apply them to the unique environmental, social and economic issues impacted upon by tourism development. We will look closely at the need to balance consumer's needs with the needs of the impacted environment. Prerequisite: HMGT 1360 Contemporary Leisure and Recreation

HMGT 1445 PROFESSIONALISM IN HOSPITALITY
3 cr.
Course teaches the “soft skills” necessary for success in the culturally diverse hospitality management environment with an emphasis on dress, proper etiquette, body language, the art of non-verbal communication, and business conversation; Networking and job search techniques are examined.  Course also explores the dynamics, meaning, and value of becoming a well-rounded person.

HMGT 1451 SENIOR SEMINAR
3 cr.
Through drawing upon both the theoretical knowledge gained through your previous course work as well as the practical exposure of the 800-hour practicum this course will create an environment where you will explore the linkages, which exist, between the theoretical and the practical. In addition, the course will serve to help prepare you to enter the real world from both a professional and a personal perspective. As a result you should gain a clearer understanding of the attitudes and behaviors that successful individuals in these related industries possess. Prerequisites: Senior Standing

HMGT 1499 INTERNSHIP: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
1-6 cr.
Practical experience in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor.

 

HUMAN RELATIONS

Contact: Professor Michael Stuckart, Program Director

The Human Relations Program focuses on the distinct, yet overlapping, contributions that scholars in the field of anthropology, psychology and sociology have made towards an understanding of human behavior. The interdisciplinary approach provides students with a greater array of theories and methods for studying and analyzing human behavior than is possible through the pursuit of a single-discipline major. Faculty in the program specialize in archaeology, gender, family, religion, deviance and criminology, childhood and adolescence, not only here in the United States but across the world in different societies.

 

BA in Human Relations Degree Requirements

Course Requirements in the Major

ANTH 0101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 0230 Practicing Anthropology 3
ANTH 1451 Capstone: Human Relations 3
PSY 0101 Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY 0201 Statistics
4
or
ECON 0204 Statistical Methods 4
or
MATH 0133 Statistics 3 4
PSY 0203 Social Psychology 3
SOC 0101 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 1302 Socialization 3
SOC 1401 Social Research 3
__
28

Human Relations Elective Requirements
Six additional courses, two each from the areas of anthropology, psychology, and sociology are required.
Elective credits
18
__
Total credits required for the major
46

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse.

 

Suggested Course of Study BA in Human Relations

First Year
ANTH 0101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3
PSY 0101 Introduction to Psychology
3
SOC 0101 Introduction to Sociology
3
ENG 0101
and 0102 English Composition I and II
6
MATH 0110 Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
Sociology Elective  
General education or elective courses
9
__
30
Second Year
Anthropology elective
3
PSY 0201 Statistics
4
or
ECON 0204 Statistical Methods
or
MATH 0133 Statistics
4
PSY 0203 Social Psychology
3
ANTH 0230 Practicing Anthropology 3
Sociology elective
3
General education or elective courses
18
__
31
Third Year
Anthropology elective
3
SOC 1302 Socialization
3
Sociology elective
3
General education or elective courses
21
__
30
Fourth Year
Psychology elective
3
Psychology elective
3
SOC 1401 Social Research 3
ANTH 1451 Capstone: Human Relations
3
General electives
17
__
29

Students seeking secondary teacher certification in social studies should meet with the director of teacher education each semester to plan out their course of study. Please refer to the section on Education Programs for further details.

Human Relations Course Descriptions

See course descriptions under Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology.

INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Contact: Don Lewicki, Program Director

Major in Information Systems
The Information Systems major consists of a 60 credit curriculum leading to an Associate of Science degree. Information Systems majors gain hands-on experience as well as conceptual knowledge in a broad range of information technologies and systems. Foundation courses focus on specific technologies while upper level courses concentrate on application and integration of technologies in the business environment. This program prepares students for entry-level positions in the field of Information Systems. It also prepares students to continue on to complete the Bachelor of Science degree in the Computer Information Systems and Technology (CIS&T) major at the university of Pittsburgh at Bradford.

AS in Information Systems Degree Requirements

Course Requirements in the Major


 

Core Requirements in Information Technology

 

 

 

CIST0150

Fundamentals of Programming

3

CIST0161

Technology of Computing

3

CIST0162

Survey of Information Technology

3

CIST0163

Introduction to Web Programming

3

CIST0165

Networking I

3

CIST0166

Networking II

3

CIST0205

Web Application Development

3

CIST0209

Introduction to Web Databases

3

CIST0261

Computer Security

3

CIST0262

Systems Administration

3

 

 

__

 

 

30


Other required courses

ENG 0101 and 0102

English Composition I and II

6

MATH 0135

Discrete Mathematics

3

  Approved Elective
3

 

 

__

 

 

12


General Education Courses

Six courses (18-19 credits) over the four human experience areas with at least one course in each area, and at least one course must be a physical or life science with laboratory.

   
  Total credits 60-61

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

For those who intend to pursue the four year degree in Computer Information Systems and Technology, we recommend that the student take the following:

  • MATH 0098 Algebra II

Suggested Course of Study AS in Information Systems

Semester 1

 

CIST0161   (3)
CIST0162   (3)
CIST0150   (3)
ENG0101   (3)
CIST0165   (3)
    15

 

Semester 2

 

CIST0166   (3)
CIST0163   (3)
MATH0135   (3)
ENG0102   (3)
GE elective   (3)
    15

 

Semester 3

 

CIST0209   (3)
CIST0205   (3)
GE elective   (3)
GE elective   (3)
GE elective   (3)
    15

 

Semester 4

 

CIST0261   (3)
CIST0262   (3)
GE elective   (3)
GE elective   (3)
GE elective   (3)
    15

 

Information Systems Course Descriptions


 

CIST 0150 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMMING

3 cr.

The course is designed to provide the student with an adequate understanding of programming concepts and principles to enable the student to design and implement programs for his or her own use or use in the classroom.


CIST 0161 THE TECHNOLOGY OF COMPUTING
3 cr.
IT professionals will encounter a variety of platforms in their career. The role of the it professional is to select. deploy, integrate, and administer platforms or components to support the organization’s it infrastructure. This course covers the fundamentals of hardware and software and how they integrate to form essential components of it systems. The recitation will be in the ASIS lab and will focus on hands-on work with such technology. Two hours of lecture and two hours of recitation per week.

 
CIST 0162 SURVEY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 cr.
This course provides an overview of the discipline of IT, describes how IT relates to other computing disciplines, and begins to install and IT mindset. The goal is to help students understand the diverse contexts in which it is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technology. Due to the need for scripting skills, the recitation will focus on learning a scripting language and how it relates to it. Two hours lecture, two hours recitation.

 
CIST 0163 INTRODUCTION TO WEB PROGRAMMING 3 cr.
The concepts of Web programming. Prominently featured are the extensible markup language (XML) and Java Server Pages (JSP). Both client-side and server-side scripting through Web database access will be introduced. Assignments will focus developing skills using XML and expandable form in Web page design. Prerequisites: CIST 0161, CIST 0162

 
CIST 0165 NETWORKING I 3 cr.
Networking I builds a deeper understanding of how networks work, including the topics of LANS, WANS, service providers, packets, hubs, routers, switches, Internet protocols routing and switching and the physical layer. Prerequisites: CIST 0161

 
CIST 0166 NETWORKING II 3 cr.
Networking II builds upon the basic networking concepts provided in Networking I by adding the ideas of networking security to the discussion. Concepts covered include: cryptography, key algorithms, firewalls, wireless and mobile security and Internet security. Prerequisites: CIST 0165

 
CIST 0205 WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT 3 cr.
The focus of this course is the development of dynamic web applications and the concepts and issues  involved in their development. Students learn current software technologies such as Visual Studio  as well as current design and development methodologies.

 
CIST 0209 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DATABASES 3 cr.
The basic concepts of data models, data sub-languages, and user-oriented query-languages in a network environment. The emphasis will be on the Structured Query Language (SQL), Query-by-Example (QBE), and the Programming Language/SQL (PL/SQL). Substantial network examples will be presented.

 
CIST 0261 COMPUTER SECURITY 3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the concepts of data security, including policies, attacks, vulnerabilities, encryption, information states, and forensics. Prerequisites: CIST 0166.

 
CIST 0262 SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION 3 cr.
This course focuses on those skills and concepts essential to the administration of computing systems, networks, software, file systems, Web systems, database systems, and system documentation, policies and procedures. This also includes education and support of the users of these systems. The recitation will consist of demonstrations and hands-on work in this area. Prerequisites: CIST 0161, CIST 0166  

 


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Contact: Kristin Asinger, Director of International Studies

Minor in International Studies

An interdisciplinary minor in international studies can be earned by completing the following requirements; a minimum of 18 credits is required. It should be noted that study abroad (either in one of the many immersion programs or a Semester at Sea program) is a requirement of the minor. Information can be obtained from Ms. Julie Dykstra in the Office of Academic Affairs in 232 Swarts Hall.

 

GEOG 0101 World Regional Geography
3
Second language proficiency through and including the intermediate level (or the equivalent)
0–9
Study Abroad
3–12
Electives
3–9

 

International Studies Electives

Arts and Letters

 

ART 0211 Japanese Art
CLP 0206 Hispanic Literature in Translation
CLP 0207 Short Fiction in Spanish
CLP 0208 French Literature in Translation
CLP 0209 20th Century Japanese Literature
CLP 0216 Modern African Literature: The Novel
CLP 0220 Caribbean Literatures and Cultures
CLP 0255 Introduction to Japanese Literature
CLP 1320 African Literature and Spirituality
ENG 0105 Masterpieces of World Literature
ENG 0203 British Literature Before 1800
ENG 0204 British Literature After 1800
ENG 0205 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG 1306 Modern Irish Literature
INTS 0112 Japanese Language and Culture
INTS 0115 Introduction to Chinese Culture and Languages
INTS 0250 Topics in International Studies
INTS 1450 Topics in International Studies
WRITNG 0230 Poetry Across Cultures

 

History and Cultures

 

ANTH 0101 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 0110 The Story of Buddhism
ANTH 0112 Tourism
ANTH 0207 Mesoamerican Archaeology
ANTH 1304 Ecology and Culture
ANTH 1305 Religion and Culture
ANTH 1325 Latin America Today
ANTH 1330 Ethnic & Tourist Arts
HIST 0105 Europe in the 20th Century
HIST 1310 East Asia: China, Korea, Japan
HIST 1319 Ancient Rome
HIST 1324 Ancient Egypt
INTS 0250 Topics in International Studies
INTS 1450 Topics in International Studies
PHIL 0215 Great Political Thinkers
PHIL 1303 Eastern Philosophy
SOC 1316 Social and Cultural Change

 

Politics and Economics

 

ECON 0112 Tourism
ECON 1403 International Trade
INTS 0250 Topics in International Studies
INTS 1450 Topics in International Studies
PS 0103 Comparative Politics
PS 0110 Introduction to International Affairs
PS 0201 World Politics
PS 0202 Great Political Thinkers
PS 0215 European Politics and the European Union
PS 0220 Media and Internet in Politics
PS 1304

American Foreign Relations

 

PS 1337 Identity Politics
PS 1340 Democratization
PS 1355 Politics of the Developing World
PS 1365 Social Movements
PS 1385 Global Environmental Politics
WOMNST 0201 Introduction to Women's Studies

 

Management and Education

 

FIN 1401 International Finance
INTS 0250 Topics in International Studies
INTS 1450 Topics in International Studies
MGMT 1305 International Management

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

International Studies Course Description

 

INTS 0101 GLOBAL ISSUES  
3 cr.
Designed to introduce students to a number of the most critical global issues—rapid population growth, hunger, third-world development, international trade and foreign competition, and the arms race—and to examine the interrelationships between these issues. Emphasis is on developing a global perspective. GE: Political Science
 
INTS 0112 JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
3 cr.

This course provides an introduction to modern Japanese culture. Beginning with a brief overview of Japanese political-religious history, it will explore ethnic groups and social stratification, geography, economics, and social conventions: manners food, holidays, home life, work expectations, sports and leisure. Basic conversational Japanese language instruction will be utilized throughout the course. Recommended for anyone who will be visiting or working in Japan, or who is interested in cross-cultural communication and comparisons. GE: Non-Western and Global Cultures

INTS 0115 INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CULTURE & LANGUAGES
3 cr.
This course surveys Chinese culture and language in both verbal and nonverbal communication forms. Beginning with a brief overview of political and historical differences between The People's Republic of China and The Republic of China (Taiwan), it explores elements of Chinese family structures, food, traditional holidays, social art, and leisure activities. Basic conversational Chinese language and rudiments of traditional Chinese writing will be utilized throughout the course. This course is recommended for anyone who is interested in China/Taiwan, as well those interested in cross-cultural communication. GE: Culture/Non-Western and Global.

 

INTS 0120 INDIA AND ITS CULTURES
3 cr.
This is a basic course on India. Students will be introduced to many aspects of Indian culture, and will study and discuss the social customs, rituals, religions, and diversity in the country Students will also touch upon gender issues and politics. Students will come to understand why India has become a dominant global presence in recent years. GE: Culture/Non-Western and Global


INTS 0250 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
3cr.
This course will cover the study of a special topics in or related to international studies

INTS 1450 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
3 cr.
This course will cover the study of a special topic in or related to international studies

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS

Contact: Professor Jeffrey Guterman, Chair of the Division of Communication and the Arts

Major in Interdisciplinary Arts

The interdisciplinary arts major at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford provides learners with a broad-based education in art, music, theater, and writing. The major explores the thematic relationships among the fine and performing arts through a combination of theoretical study and experiential learning. Students take courses within four academic disciplines, selecting two disciplines as major components of study. The interdisciplinary experience culminates with the completion of the Capstone course, in which senior students create projects that encompass multiple arts disciplines. Students majoring in interdisciplinary arts complete a total of 45 credits in the program – 9 general program credits taken by all students, 18 credits in each of two major areas of study.

Students are required to select two arts areas from art, music, theater, and writing disciplines as their major components in their Interdisciplinary Arts Major program.

Interdisciplinary Arts Major Requirements: Art Emphasis


Select two arts areas from Art or Music or Theater or Writing (18 credits/discipline) 36 credits

 

IA 0101 Arts Awareness
3
COMM 1307   Visual Communication
3
IA 1451   Capstone
3
  __
Total
45

 

The art requirements of a major in Interdisciplinary Arts with selection of Art as one of two major components are completed with the following courses:



Four studio art OR art history courses, which can include upper-level course(s)     
12
One art history course:    
3
One upper-level studio art OR art history course:     3
__
Total credits required for Art:
18

 

Available lower-level studio art courses: ART 0101 Drawing I, ART 0201 Figure Drawing, ART 0201 Painting I, ART 0208 Watercolor Painting, ART 0109 Mural Design, ART 0112 Printmaking I, ART 0103 Digital Graphic Design, ART 0113 Digital Photography & Imaging, ART 0110 Ceramics I, ART 0213 Japanese Visual Arts & Crafts.

Available lower-level art history courses: ART 0105 World Art Survey I, ART 0106 World Art Survey II, ART 0111 Art Appreciation.

Available upper-level studio art and art history courses: ART 1301 Advanced Drawing, ART 1303 Advanced Digital Graphic Design, ART 1305 Advanced Painting, ART 1315 Advanced Ceramics, ART 1310 Modern Art, ART 1450 Topics in Art, ART 1497 Directed Study: Art, ART 1498 Directed Research: Art, ART 1499 Internship in Art.

The music requirements of a major in Interdisciplinary Arts with selection of Music as one of two major components are completed with the following courses:



Five 3-credit music courses:      
15
MUSIC 1339 Musical Styles
3
__
  Total credits required for Music:
18

 

Available lower-level music courses: MUSIC 0101 Elements of Music (formerly Basic Musicianship), MUSIC 0102 Introduction to Music, MUSIC 0215 Introduction to Music Technology, MUSIC 0202 Symphony, MUSIC 0203 Opera, MUSIC 0205 College/Community Choir (1 cr. x 3), MUSIC 0195 Applied Study (1 cr. x 3)

The theater requirements of a major in Interdisciplinary Arts with selection of Theater as one of two major components are completed with the following courses:


THEA 0101 Introduction to Theater  
3
THEA 0203 Play Analysis 3
Two courses from THEA 0102 Stagecraft AND/OR THEA 0103 Performance
6
One upper-level theatre course   3
One further elective course in theater, lower or upper level 3
__
  Total credits required for Theater :
18

 

Available upper-level theater courses: THEA 1302 Directing, THEA 1303 Playwriting, THEA 1304 Advanced Acting, THEA 1310 Shakespearean Performances, THEA 1497 Directed Study, THEA 1498 Directed Research, THEA 1499 Internship in Theatre

The writing requirements of a major in Interdisciplinary Arts with selection of Writing as one of two major components are completed with the following courses:


Four writing courses, which can include upper-level course(s)
12
One literature course: 3
One upper-level writing course 3
__
  Total credits required for Writing:
18

 

Available lower-level writing courses: COMM 0106 News Writing, WRITNG 0106 Introduction to Fiction Writing, WRITNG 0107 Beginning Poetry Writing, COMM 0108 Newspaper Staff, WRITNG 0108 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction, WRITNG 0111 Literary Editing and Magazine Production 1, WRITNG 0211 Literary Editing and Magazine Production 2.

Available upper-level writing courses: WRITNG 1302 Advanced Fiction Writing, WRITNG 1304 Advanced Poetry Writing, WRITNG 1310 Advanced Feature Writing, WRITNG 1311 Literary Editing and Magazine Production 3, WRITNG 1402 Writing from the Self, WRITNG 1450 Topics in Writing

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Interdisciplinary Arts Course Descriptions

 

IA 0101 ARTS AWARENESS
3 cr.
This arts seminar course encourages an integrated exploration and analysis of the arts. The course is taught in the hybrid format in which students attend a weekly seminar, engage in online course activities, and attend arts events. An important focus of the course is on various interdisciplinary approaches to the arts. Several events are made available for the students each term through the college's spectrum series. GE: Arts

COMM 1307 VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS
3 cr.
This course develops a visual grammar for the images that we make and receive. We examine the nature of light and the physiology of the eye and brain, the social construction of symbols, and what ethical responsibilities makers of visual messages must consider. We also explore the role of digital technology in the generation and interpretation of visual images.

IA 1451 CAPSTONE
3 cr.
Students will explore the relationships between the fine and performing arts in the form of seminars to be offered at the start of the course. These seminars will provide the stimulus for the students' final projects that will emphasize and express their major area of study. The directed project will also focus on creative and critical thinking.

 

Art Course Descriptions: please see course descriptions under Art

Music Course Descriptions: please see course descriptions under Music

Theater Course Descriptions: please see course descriptions under Theater

Writing Course Descriptions: please see course descriptions under Writing and English


LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

Leadership Development Course Description

This course may be taken as an elective.

 

LDEV 0007 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
1 cr.
This course, presented by student affairs staff, permits students to examine various aspects of leadership and develop skills that will help them in future leadership positions, both in college and beyond. Included are discussions on human development and leadership theories, communication skills, small-group dynamics, leadership strategies and styles, and the nature of power and influence.

 

 

Minor in Legal Studies

Contact: Tony Gaskew, Program Director

A minor in legal studies is designed to provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of the nature of law and crime, and how it’s applied from a variety of pedagogical perspectives within the behavioral and social sciences.

A minor in legal studies can be earned by completing the following 18 credits:

(students must earn a C- or better in all minor courses and a GPA of 2.0 in the minor is required)

Required courses:

 

PHIL 0202 Philosophy and Public Issues
SOC 0204 Sociology of Deviance
PS 0205 Law and the Courts
ADMJ 1321 Law and Social Control in Society
ADMJ 1302

Criminal Law and Procedure

 

 

Select one elective from the following:

 

PS 1310 Constitutional Law
ADMJ 1403 Contemporary Issues in Courts, Policy, and Justice
PSY 1410 Psychology and Law
PHIL 1445

Environmental Ethics 

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

LIBERAL STUDIES

Contact: Professor Stephen Robar, Program Director

Associate Degree in Liberal Studies

The Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies is the perfect program for you to enroll in and finally earn the college degree you have been thinking about for years. It's a great start on the way to a bachelor's degree, too. The liberal studies program provides incredible flexibility for moving on to a "4-year degree." Online and evening courses are available. Students may enroll part-time or full-time.

 

Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies Program
Competencies (12 credits)
ENG 0101 English Composition I 3
ENG 0102 English Composition II 3
MATH 0098 College Algebra II or higher level MATH course 3

Arts and Letters (9 credits)
Must include at least one course in literature, and at least one course in the creative, fine, and performing arts
Literature (GE: Literature)
Creative, Fine, and Performing Arts (GE: Arts)
Second Languages (GE: Language)

Behavioral, Economic, and Political Sciences (9 credits)
Courses must be selected from three different disciplines (e.g., sociology, psychology, political science) representing at least two different categories (e.g., behavioral science, economics, and political science).
Behavioral Sciences (GE: Behavioral Sciences)
Economics (GE: Economics)
Political Science (GE: Political Science)

History, Culture, and Philosophical Inquiry (9 credits)
Selections must include at least one Non-Western and Global category course.
History (GE: History)
Cultures (GE: Cultures)
Philosophical Inquiry (GE: Philosophy)

Physical, Life, and Computational Sciences (10 credits)
Selections must include one course in physical sciences and one course in life sciences, one of which must have a lab.
Physical Sciences (GE: Physical Sciences)
Life Sciences (GE: Life Sciences)
Computational Sciences (GE: Computational Sciences)

General Electives (14 credits)
Choose any four or five courses.

TOTAL CREDITS TO GRADUATE 60 credits


MANAGEMENT

See Business Management.

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

See Business Management.

MARKETING

See Business Management.

MATHEMATICS

Contact: Marius Buliga, Program Director

Major in Applied Mathematics

Mathematics includes the study of probability and statistics, modeling, computer simulation languages, and methods of application. Mathematics provides an excellent foundation for other fields of study ranging from the sciences and technology to business and law. The combination of mathematics, physics, and computer science creates opportunities for employment and also prepares students for graduate study. Applied Mathematics majors can simultaneously earn a degree in Mathematics Education by taking some education courses.

 

BS in Applied Mathematics Degree Requirements

Course Requirements in the Major

MATH 0140 Calculus I 4
MATH 0150 Calculus II 4
MATH 0201 Calculus III 4
MATH 0202 Ordinary Differential Equations
3
MATH 0206 Linear Algebra
3
MATH 1303 Mathematical Modeling
3
MATH 1308 Numerical Analysis
3
or    
MATH 1312 Abstract Algebra and Number Theory  
MATH 1309 Applied Probability and Statistics
4
MATH 1315 Advanced Differential Equations
3
MATH 1318 Introduction to Analysis
4
MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics
3
Mathematics upper-level elective
3
__
41
Other required courses:

 
ENGR  0012   Introduction to Engineering Computing
3
MATH 1304    Introduction to Simulation
or
MATH 1320    Operations Research
3
__
6
Total credits required for the major
47

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 


Suggested Course of Study BS in Applied Mathematics

First Year
MATH 0140
and 0150 Calculus I and II
8
ENG 0101
and 0102 English Composition I and II
6
CS 0101 Introduction to Computer Science
4
FS 0102 Freshman Seminar
3
General education or elective courses
11
__
32
Second Year
MATH 0201 Calculus III 4
MATH 0202 Ordinary Differential Equations 3
MATH 0206 Linear Algebra 3
MATH 1318 Introduction to Analysis 4
MATH 1316 Computational Linear Algebra
or
MATH 1304 Introduction to Simulation 3
General education or elective courses
12
__
29
Third Year
MATH 1303 Mathematical Modeling 3
MATH 1309 Applied Probability and Statistics 4
Upper-level math elective
3
General education or elective courses
18
__
28
Fourth Year
MATH 1308 Numerical Analysis 3
MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics 3
MATH 1315 Advanced Differential Equations
3
MATH elective
3
General education or elective courses
18
__
30
Actuarial Science Concentration

MATH 0140 Calculus I 4
MATH 0150 Calculus II 4
MATH 0201 Calculus III 4
MATH 0202 Ordinary Differential Equations 3
MATH 0206 Linear Algebra 3
MATH 1308 Numerical Analysis 3
MATH 1309 Applied Probability and Statistics 4
MATH 1315 Advanced Differential Equations 3
MATH 1318 Introduction to Analysis 4
MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics 3
MATH 1455 Writings in the History of Mathematics 3
ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts 3
ACCT 0202 Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
ECON 0102 Microeconomics 3
ECON 0103 Macroeconomics 3
__
50
Note: Seniors will be required to take one of the first two actuarial exams in their senior year.
Although not required, it is suggested that students in actuarial science take as many of the following courses as possible:
ECON 0204 Statistical Methods 4
ECON 0206 Intermediate Microeconomics 3
ECON 0207 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3
ECON 0208 Mathematical Economics 3
ECON 1304 Econometrics and Business Forecasting 4
FIN 1301 Corporate Finance 3
Physics Concentration

Core Requirements in Mathematics

MATH 0140
and 0150 Calculus I and II 8
MATH 0201 Calculus III 4
MATH 0202 Ordinary Differential Equations 3
MATH 0206 Linear Algebra 3
MATH 1303 Mathematical Modeling 3
MATH 1305 Partial Differential Equations 3
or
MATH 1315 Advanced Differential Equations 3
MATH 1307 Complex Variables for Science and Engineering 3
or
MATH 1309 Applied Probability and Statistics 4
MATH 1308 Numerical Analysis
or
MATH 1325 Computer Applications in Mathematical Physics 3
MATH 1315 Advanced Differential Equations
3
MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics
3
MATH 1455 Writings in the History of Mathematics
3
__
37
Core Requirements in Physics
PHYS 0201
and 0202 Foundations of Physics I and II 8
PHYS 0203
and 0204 Foundations of Physics I and II Labs 2
PHYS 1301 Introduction to Experimental Physics 2
Select two courses from the following:
PHYS 1302 Modern Physics, Atoms, and Nuclei 6
PHYS 1304 Electromagnetic Theory
PHYS 1306 Optics
__
18
Computer Science Requirements

CS 0101 Introduction to Computer Science 4
__
Total credits required for the major
59

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Minor in Mathematics

A minor in mathematics may be earned by completing the following requirements:

MATH 0140
and 0150 Calculus I and II
8
Three mathematics electives (courses must be 0200 level or above, and one must be upper-level)
9–12
__
17–20
Students seeking secondary teacher certification in mathematics should meet with the director of teacher education each semester to plan out their course of study. Please refer to the section on Education Programs for further details.

 

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

Minor in Mathematics Modeling

A minor in math modeling may be earned by completing the following course requirements:

MATH 0140
and 0150 Calculus I and II
8
MATH 1303 Mathematical Modeling
3
CS 1304 Introduction to Simulation
3
Math electives:
Must include two upper-level math courses
6–9
__
20-23

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

Mathematics Course Descriptions

 

MATH 0097 COLLEGE ALGEBRA I
3 cr.
This course covers the real number system, operations on real numbers, basic algebraic concepts and operations-simplifying and factoring-, solving linear and quadratic equations and linear inequalities, solving systems of linear equations in two variables, and graphing linear functions. Note: College Algebra I does not satisfy Mathematics Competency.

MATH 0098 COLLEGE ALGEBRA II
3 cr.
The topics covered in college algebra II are functions—linear, radical, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic—and their graphs, rational expressions, linear and compound inequalities, rational exponents, solving systems of linear equations, and solving quadratic equations. Prerequisite: MATH 0097 with a grade of C- or better or direct placement based upon math assessment. GE: Mathematics Competency.

MATH 0110 FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS
3 cr.
This course is a survey course designed for students who are not required by their major to pursue further studies in college mathematics. Topics covered include introduction to calculators, statistics, counting methods, probability, geometry, consumer mathematics, and algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 0097 with a grade of C- or better or direct placement based upon math assessment.GE: Mathematics Competency

MATH 0132 PRECALCULUS
4 cr.
The topics include intermediate algebra, functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational functions, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, and trigonometry. Extra credit for emphasis on trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 0097 with a grade of C- or better or direct placement based upon math assessment. GE: Mathematics Competency or Computational Sciences

MATH 0133 STATISTICS
4 cr.
This is an introductory statistics course and covers methods of summarizing data, descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, sampling distributions, the central limit theorem, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and regression analysis. Mathematical derivations and formulas are stressed. The use of technology is also stressed. Prerequisite: MATH 0098 or MATH 0110 or MATH 0132 GE: Computational Sciences

MATH 0135 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS
3 cr.
The study of computer-oriented mathematical concepts and structures, including sets, relations and maps, counting, Boolean algebra (propositional calculus and circuits), trees and graphs, and recursion. Other mathematical concepts studied are the binary number systems, computer codes, computer arithmetic, logic, truth tables, algorithms, sets, and relations. GE: Computational Sciences

MATH 0136 APPLIED CALCULUS
4 cr.
An introduction to differential and integral calculus with emphasis on applications. The topics include differentiation of polynomials, logarithms and exponentials, graphing, integration, Taylor series, multivariable calculus, special optimization techniques, and modeling. Prerequisite: MATH 0132 (with a grade of C or better) GE: Mathematics Competency or Computational Sciences

MATH 0139 ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS
3 cr.
This course focuses on properties of the real number system, operations on subsets of the real numbers, estimation, probability, statistics, measurement, and geometry. Problem-solving techniques and reasoning are used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 0097 with a grade of C- or better or direct placement based upon math assessment. GE: Computational Sciences.

MATH 0140 CALCULUS I
4 cr.
The first term of a three-term sequence required of all engineering, mathematics, and chemistry majors; it is the basic course leading to all advanced courses in mathematics and the natural and physical sciences. It includes a study of the derivative, trigonometric functions, the integral, and applications of the derivative and the integral. Prerequisite: MATH 0132 (with a grade of C or better) or 550 SAT-M or appropriate math placement score GE: Mathematics Competency or Computational Sciences

MATH 0150 CALCULUS II
4 cr.
Continuation of MATH 0140. The subject matter in this course includes differentiation of logarithms, exponential inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic function, techniques of integration, infinite series, power series, plane curves, and the polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 0140 (with a grade of C or better)

MATH 0201 CALCULUS III
4 cr.
A continuation of MATH 0150. The topics included are space geometry and vectors, vector analysis of curves, differential and integral calculus of several variables, applications of partial derivatives, divergence, Green’s and Stokes’ theorems, and differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 0150 (with a grade of C or better)

MATH 0202 ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3 cr.
Topics include: basic concepts, autonomous equations, first order linear, second order with forcing functions, quantitative and qualitative aspects, power series solutions, models and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 0150.

MATH 0205 FINITE DIFFERENCES AND DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS
3 cr.
The topics in this course include the calculus of finite differences, difference equations, and applications. Emphasis is on linear equations with constant coefficients and matrix methods, the generation of functions, and the z-transform method. Prerequisite: MATH 0150

MATH 0206 LINEAR ALGEBRA
3 cr.
A study of systems of linear equations using the concepts of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MATH 0140

MATH 0207 GEOMETRY
3 cr.
A review of the axiomatic system of Euclidean geometry. The course is designed primarily for majors in mathematics who seek secondary teacher certification in mathematics. This course can be used as a mathematics elective. GE: Computational Science

MATH 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in mathematics.

MATH 1303 MATHEMATICAL MODELING
3 cr.
An application of mathematical concepts and computer software to the formulation of models and solutions related to criteria ranking, decision making, biological modeling, environmental modeling, and optimization. This course is especially helpful to students who want experience in applications-oriented mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 0150 Corequisite: MATH 0206 or permission of the instructor

MATH 1304 INTRODUCTION TO SIMULATION
3 cr.

The concepts, definitions, and techniques applicable to the modeling and simulation of systems with emphasis on discrete system simulation methods. Topics include system characterization, classification and modeling, pertinence of concepts from probability and statistics, and introductory description of suitable programming languages. Prerequisites: MATH 1301, 1303

 

 

 

MATH 1305 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND FOURIER SERIES
3 cr.
A study of partial differential equations, including parabolic, hyperbolic, and elliptic equations using Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms, and Laplace Transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 0202
 
MATH 1306 ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL MODELING 3 cr.

Models based on different equations including growth, decay, cycles, and oscillations using a continuous system simulation language will be studied. Prerequisites: MATH 0202, 1301

 

 

MATH 1307 COMPLEX VARIABLES FOR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
3 cr.
Topics included in this course are complex functions, basic transcendental functions, integration in the complex plane, Laurent Series, residues and their use in integration, conformal mapping, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 0201

MATH 1308 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS
3 cr.
Numerical techniques related to location of roots, polynomial interpretation, numerical integration, ordinary differential equations, Monte Carlo methods, and smoothing of data. Prerequisite: MATH 0150

MATH 1309 APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
4 cr.
This course covers random events and probability spaces; conditional probability; random variables, distribution of random variables, and parameters of distributions; and central limit theorem. Populations, samples and statistical inference, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis are also covered. There is some work with a statistical computer package (MINITAB or SPSS). Prerequisite: MATH 0150

MATH 1312 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA AND NUMBER THEORY
4 cr.
This course is intended for upper-level undergraduate students who wish to enhance their mathematical background and is required for math education majors. It introduces some basic concepts in abstract algebra and number theory and covers groups, rings, fields, polynomials, and properties of integers. Prerequisites: MATH 0135, 0150

MATH 1314 TOPICS IN MODERN GEOMETRY
3 cr.
This course exposes students to some aspects of modern geometry. In addition to the major emphasis on geometric transformations, one or more topics are selected from a wide variety of branches at the discretion of the instructor. Projective geometry, topology, differential geometry, noneuclidean geometry, graph theory, fractal geometry, computational geometry, and computer graphics are among these topics. This course can replace MATH 0207 as a requirement for math education majors.

MATH 1315 ADVANCED DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
3 cr.
Systems of ordinary equations will be the main focus of this course. Topics include stability analysis, limit cycles, oscillations, excitable systems, and bifurcations. Software aids will also be used. Prerequisite: MATH 0202

MATH 1316 COMPUTATIONAL LINEAR ALGEBRA

(Cross listed with CS 1316)

3 cr.
This course consists of two parts: the computational linear algebra part and an applications part. The first part is primarily devoted to using software aids and lab sessions and is two-thirds of the course. The last third will be devoted to small group projects. All the basic topics of linear algebra will be studied. Prerequisite: MATH 0206, CS 0101

MATH 1318 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS
4 cr.
This is a follow-up to the three-term calculus sequence courses and designed to bridge the gap between the intuitive calculus and the advanced mathematics. Through a rigorous treatment of the basic concepts already encountered in calculus, students will learn how to express themselves mathematically and, in particular, to write mathematical proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 0201

MATH 1320 OPERATIONS RESEARCH

(Cross listed with MGMT 1302)

3 cr.
This course is an introduction to operations research with emphasis on economic applications. The topics include formulation and solving of linear programming problems, integer programming, simplex method, transportation problems, and network models. Prerequisite: MATH 0140 or MATH 0136 and MATH 0202 or MATH 0206

MATH 1325 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS

(Cross-listed with PHYS 1325)

3 cr.
Various mathematical approaches such as finite difference and Monte Carlo methods are employed to solve problems from classical and modern physics. These numerical problems are included but not limited to the scattering of light by small particles, celestial mechanics, and applications of the Schrodinger Equation. A suitable symbolic platform such as mathematical will be utilized for this task.

MATH 1401 METHODS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 cr.
Mathematical techniques, including calculus of variations, the Gamma and Beta functions, asymptotic series, elliptic integrals, complex functions, Laurent Series, residue theorem, methods involving integral transforms, the Dirac Delta function, Green functions, and perturbation techniques. Prerequisite: MATH 0202

MATH 1450 TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 cr.

The advanced study of a special topic in applied mathematics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor


MATH 1451 SENIOR SEMINAR
1-3 cr.
Designed to cover contemporary topics of interest. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

MATH 1452 CAPSTONE: MATHEMATICS
3 cr.
A yearlong project in mathematics supervised by a member of the mathematics faculty. One credit the first semester and two credits the second. Required in applied mathematics, but is open to other qualified students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor GE: Capstone

MATH 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: MATH
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of math. Permission of the instructor is required.


MATH 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: MATH
1-3 cr.
Independent research in mathematics supervised by a member of the mathematics faculty. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

 

 

 

MILITARY SCIENCE

Military Science Course Descriptions

The courses below are listed for the convenience of students enrolled in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program through Saint Bonaventure University. Please contact Saint Bonaventure University at 716-375-2568 or see its Web site at www.sbu.edu/academics_rotc.html for more information.

 

MILS 0101 FOUNDATIONS OF OFFICERSHIP
2 cr.
The purpose of this semester is to introduce cadets to fundamental components of service as an officer in the U.S. Army. These initial lessons form the building blocks of progressive lessons in values, fitness, leadership, and officership. Additionally, the semester addresses life skills, including fitness, communications theory and practice (written and oral), and interpersonal relationships. Upon completion of this semester, the cadets should be prepared to receive more complex leadership instruction. GE: Physical Education

MILS 0201 INDIVIDUAL LEADERSHIP STUDIES
2 cr.
This semester contains the principal leadership instruction of the basic course. Building upon the fundamentals introduced in the Military Science I (MS-I) year, this instruction delves into several aspects of communication and leadership theory. The use of practical exercise is significantly increased over previous semesters, as cadets are increasingly required to apply communications and leadership concepts. Virtually the entire semester teaches critical life skills. The relevance of these life skills to future success in the Army is emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: MILS 101

MILS 1301 LEADERSHIP AND PROBLEM SOLVING
2 cr.

The advanced course accepts cadets with various levels of leadership competencies gained through life experiences and complemented by the ROTC basic course or lateral entry constructive credit activities. The instructional content and activities in the MS 300-level curriculum are intended to build leadership competencies and facilitate the cadet’s initial demonstration of individual leadership potential at the National Advanced Leadership Camp (NALC), while also preparing cadets for their future responsibilities as officers. Because advanced camp uses small-unit infantry tactics as the context for the development and assessment of leadership, MS 300-level instruction uses the same context. While a measure of technical and tactical understanding of small-unit operations is necessary, the focus of instruction is on the leadership competencies. Much of the application and assessment of MS 300-level leadership instruction will be conducted using the Leadership Development Program (LDP) for out-of-class activities: leadership positions during labs and unit operations. The MS 301 semester begins with instruction in the Leadership Development Process (LDP) used throughout the academic year and at the National Advanced Leadership Camp (NALC) to assess and develop leadership. The MS 301 semester uses a defensive scenario because the planning requirements of the defense better facilitates the achievement of our learning objectives, and because defensive operations are more universally relevant to officers of all branches. Instruction in principles of war and purposes, fundamentals, and characteristics of the defense provides the necessary knowledge base for meaningful contextual treatment of the Troop Leading Procedures (TLP). Instruction in the decision-making, planning, and execution processes of the TLP are followed by a refocus on the critical leadership task of communicating the plan using the Operations Order format. An advanced leadership module addresses motivational theory and techniques, the role and actions of leaders, and risk assessment. The semester closes with instruction in small-unit battle drills to facilitate practical application and further leader development during Lab and FTX Squad Situational Training Exercises (STX). Prerequisite: MILS 0201

 

MILS 1302 LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS
2 cr.
This course includes opportunities to plan and conduct individual and collective skill training for offensive operations to gain leadership and tactical experience. It synthesizes the various components of training, leadership and team building. Upon completion of this course, cadets will possess the fundamental confidence and competence of leadership in a small unit setting. Prerequisite: MILS 1301  
   

 

MILS 1401 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
2 cr.
This semester of the advanced course concentrates on leadership, management, and ethics and begins the final transition from cadet to lieutenant. The course focuses cadets, early in the year, on attaining knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas they will need to operate effectively as Army officers. These areas include coordinate activities with staffs, counseling theory and practice within the “Army Context,” training management, and ethics. The introduction of these subjects early in the MS-IV year has the added benefit of preparing cadets to lead the cadet battalion throughout the remainder of the year. While the proficiency attained in each of these areas will initially be at the apprentice level, cadets will continue to sharpen these skills as they perform their roles as cadet officers in the battalion and after commissioning. At the end of this semester, cadets should possess the fundamental skills, attributes, and abilities to operate as competent leaders in the cadet battalion and confidently communicate to subordinate cadets their preparedness to shoulder the responsibilities entrusted to them. Prerequisite: MILS 1301
 

 

MILS 1402 OFFICERSHIP
2 cr.
This advanced course focuses on completing the transition from cadet to lieutenant. It involves legal aspects of decision-making and leadership, organization of operations from the tactical to the strategic level, administrative and logistical management, the process of changing duty stations and reporting to a new unit. Upon completion of this course, cadets will be prepared to be a commissioned officer in the United States Army. Prerequisite: MILS 1401

 

MUSIC

Music Course Descriptions

Contact: Professor John Levey

Courses may be taken as electives or to fulfill General Education Program requirements, as noted.

 

MUSIC 0101 ELEMENTS OF MUSIC
3 cr.
This course covers musical notation, scales, intervals, harmonic structures, and their application in performance, with emphasis on vocal and keyboard sight-reading. GE: Arts

MUSIC 0102 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC
3 cr.
Teaches the student how to listen to music. The fundamentals of music with applications to the formal designs of instrumental compositions and dramatic effects of vocal music are examined. Prepares students for study in the history of music and enables them to listen perceptively and creatively. GE: Arts

MUSIC 0195 APPLIED MUSIC
1 cr.
(May be repeated, but not more than three credits may count toward the IA major.)
Private applied music lessons are available in piano, voice, guitar, and all the instruments of the orchestra. Students may arrange to study privately without academic credit, or may audition for acceptance into this credit-bearing course. A student may opt to study a different instrument in succeeding semesters.

MUSIC 0202 THE SYMPHONY
3 cr.
This course covers the evolution of symphonic form from pre-classical origins to its present state with examples chosen from the works of European and American composers. Compositions are analyzed during class using orchestral scores and recordings. GE: Arts

MUSIC 0203 OPERA
3 cr.
This course covers the development of operatic styles and forms from the 18th century to the present. Works are studied in class with the aid of study scores and recordings. GE: Arts

MUSIC 0205 COLLEGE/COMMUNITY CHOIR
1 cr.

A choral group that performs classical music. May be taken for credit three times only. Activity Credit.


MUSIC 0213 PERFORMANCE PRACTICUM
1 cr.
An outlet for public music performance on campus.  The course is open to vocalists and instrumentalists, and may be elected concurrently with MUSIC 0195.  Via regular coaching and rehearsal, students work toward two to three short performances per term, which might range from informal in-class recitals to public campus events.  Repertoire decisions are made in consultation with the instructor.  Duos, trios, and small ensembles are welcome; piano accompaniment is available.  Performance Practicum has no prerequisites, but is intended for musicians of at least intermediate skill.  
 
MUSIC 0214 VOCAL ARTS ENEMBLE
1 cr.

A small, student-only vocal ensemble. Via weekly rehearsals and coachings, students work toward two to three short performances per semester. These range from informal recitals to public fundraisers and campus events. Some students will have the opportunity to perform as soloists or in duos or trios. Vocal Arts Ensemble is intended for singers of at least intermediate ability, but no audition is required.


MUSIC 0215 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC TECHNOLOGY
3 cr.
Recent developments in the intersection of computing and the music experience. The use, theory, concepts, and terminology of computing in music. Topics include MIDI sequencing, music notation and printing, analysis of the properties of sound, methods of sound synthesis, and sampling, leading to composition and musical performance.

MUSIC 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in music.
 
MUSIC 0260 MUSIC IN FILM
3 cr.

An introduction to the history, functions, techniques, and significance of film music. Students will explore more than two dozen representative scores, ranging from masterpieces of Hollywood’s “Golden Era” (King Kong, Gone with the Wind) to today’s blockbusters (Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings). The primary focus of the course is the traditional symphonic score, but song and compilation scores will also be discussed. No music reading ability required. GE: Arts

 
MUSIC 1339 MUSICAL STYLES
3 cr.
A more detailed exploration of art music repertoire, with emphasis on societal context, compositional technique, and present-day relevance. The subject matter of the course varies from semester to semester, and may focus on particular composers (e.g., Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven), stylistic epochs (e.g., Romanticism), or locations (e.g. American Music). Music reading ability recommended, but not required. GE: Arts

 

 


 

 

 

 


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