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BIOLOGY

Contact: Professor David Merwine, Program Director

Major in Biology

The biology major prepares students for various careers in biology and for graduate or professional studies. Biology is a common entry point into the health sciences, including schools of medicine, dentistry, optometry, osteopathy, podiatry, chiropractic medicine, physical and occupational therapy, and veterinary medicine.

 

BS in Biology Requirements

Course requirements in the major

BIOL 0101 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
4
BIOL 0102 Introduction to Biodiversity
4
BIOL 0203 Genetics
4
BIOL 0217 Principles of Ecology and Evolution
4
BIOL 1451 Capstone
3
1453 Senior Seminar
1
BIOL
Upper-level Biology Electives (two of which must include a lab)
16
Other required courses

CHEM 0101 and 0102 General Chemistry I and II
8
CHEM 0206 and 0207 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
4
The mathematic requirement may be satisfied by taking any one of the following:

3–4
MATH 0132, 0136, or 0140 Precalculus, Applied Calculus, OR Calculus 1
The physics requirement may be satisfied by taking any of the following:

3–4
PHYS 0101, 0103, 0201 Introduction to Physics I, Concepts of Modern Physics, OR Foundations of Physics I

Total credits required for the major
57–60

 

Students interested in applying to schools of chiropractic, dentistry/dental medicine, medicine, optometry, podiatry, and veterinary medicine must complete one year of Organic Chemistry with labs (CHEM 0206, 0207, 0208, and 0209); one year of General Physics with labs (PHYS 0101 and 0102 or 0201, 0202, 0203, and 0204); and one semester of Calculus (Math 0140).

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

 

Suggested Course of Study BS in Biology

 

First Year
ENG 0101 and 0102 English Composition I and II
6
BIOL 0101 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
4
BIOL 0102 Introduction to Biodiversity
4
CHEM 0101 and 0102 General Chemistry I and II
8
Math option (MATH 0130, 0132, 0136, or 0140 Precalculus for Business Majors, Precalculus, Applied Calculus, OR Calculus 1
3–4
General education requirement
3–4
Physical education requirement
1
__
29–31

Second Year
BIOL 0203 Genetics
4
BIOL 0217 Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
4
CHEM 0206 and 0207 Organic Chemistry I with Lab
4
General education or elective courses
18
__
30

Third Year
Upper-level biology electives
8
Physics option (PHYS 0101, 0103, or 0201 Introduction to Physics I, Concepts of Modern Physics, OR Foundations of Physics I
3–4
General education or elective courses
18–19
__
29–31

Fourth Year
BIOL 1451 Capstone
3
BIOL 1453 Senior Seminar
1
Upper-level biology electives
8
General education or elective courses
18
__
30

Students seeking secondary teacher certification in biology should meet with an advisor in biology each semester to plan their course of study in biology and with the director of teacher education each semester to plan their course of study in education. Please refer to the section on Education Programs for further details.

Minor in Biology

A minor in biology can be earned by completing the following requirements:

 

BIOL 0101
Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

4
BIOL 0102 Introduction to Biodiversity
4
BIOL 0217 Introduction to Ecology and Evolution
4
Upper-level biology electives
8
__
20
High school chemistry and/or CHEM 0101 and 0102 General Chemistry I and II are highly recommended.

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 


Biology Course Descriptions

 

BIOL 0091 CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY
3 cr.

Designed for the non-major. A survey of biological concepts providing students with a good understanding of how biology relates to everyday life. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences Three hours of lecture per week. GE: Life Sciences


BIOL 0092 CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY LAB
1 cr.

Designed for the non-major.  May be taken concurrently or after past completion of BIOL 0103 CONCEPTS OF BIOLOGY lecture.  Laboratory study of diverse aspects of biology. GE: Life Sciences


BIOL 0101 INTRODUCTION TO CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 cr.

Designed for the student majoring in biology. Introduces basic concepts about cell structure and function, including the wide variety of macromolecules that play key roles in living systems. The genetic mechanisms by which hereditary information is passed down from one generation to the next will be discussed. The genetics of populations as a whole and the evolution of species will also be studied. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences


BIOL 0102 INTRODUCTION TO BIODIVERSITY
4 cr.

Designed for the student majoring in biology. An evolutionary survey of organisms, including an introduction to structure and function of various organ systems. Basic concepts of ecology, the interaction of organisms in their environment, will be covered. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences


BIOL 0106 HUMAN GENETICS
3 cr.
Designed for the non-major. Introduces the basic principles of genetics from the perspective of the genetics of humans. Topics include the inheritance of single-gene and multigene traits, genetic diseases, genetic counseling, population genetics, and the social and ethical implications of recent genetic advances. Three hours of lecture per week. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0108 PLANTS AND PEOPLE: INTRO TO ETHNOBOTANY
3 cr.
Designed for the non-major. The value of plants to society is introduced along with a discussion of the plants as part of the natural world. The course will examine the uses of plants by many cultures, past and present, for food, timber, fuel, clothing, religious activities, and medicine, among other uses. A basic introduction to the anatomy and ecology of plants will also be covered. Three hours lecture per week. GE: Life Sciences (Non-Western)

BIOL 0109 PLANTS AND PEOPLE: INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOBOTANY LAB
1 cr.
Designed for the non-major. May be taken concurrently or after past completion of BIOL 0108 lecture. Students will be involved in hands-on activities to examine the relationship between plants and people. For example, students will identify local plants of cultural, economic, and/or medicinal importance. Simple experiments to test the toxicity of extracts from plants will be performed. Three hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0112 HUMAN BIOLOGY
3 cr.
Designed for the non-major. General principles of genetics, biochemistry, anatomy, and physiology are illustrated with reference to normal human body functions. Topics are structured to allow the student to better appreciate contemporary issues and controversies. Three hours of lecture per week. GE: Life Sciences.

BIOL 0114 HUMAN BIOLOGY LAB
1 cr.
Designed for the non-major. May be taken concurrently or after past completion of BIOL 0112 Human Biology lecture. Laboratory study of diverse aspects of human biology. Topics include biochemistry, human anatomy, physiology, disease, genetics, and development. GE: Life Science.

BIOL 0118 ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
3 cr.
The course is designed for the non-major. Basic principles of ecology are introduced along with a discussion of the complexity of environmental problems and their solutions. Three hours of lecture per week. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0119 ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY LAB
1 cr.

The laboratory will include field trips to various habitats in our region and analysis of environmental parameters. Concurrent or previous enrollment in BIOL 0118 required. Three hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences


BIOL 0202 MICROBIOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
4 cr.
Designed for the non-major. Principles of medical microbiology and immunology. Control of infectious disease and host-parasite relationships will be emphasized using a systemic approach to the study of infectious disease. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Spring, every year. This course may not be used to fulfill requirements in the biology major or minor.

BIOL 0203 GENETICS
4 cr.
Designed for the student majoring in biology. A study of biological variation at the molecular level of DNA at the organismal level via the phenotypic analysis of families, and at the population level concerning the genetics of whole populations of individuals. These topics will be covered through the problem-solving approach. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102 and corequisite: CHEM 0102 or consent of instructor

BIOL 0212 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
3 cr.
A study of the gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology, and homeostatic mechanisms of the human body, stressing the relationship of structure to function. This semester covers cell types and tissues and the cellular processes of osmosis, diffusion, and active and passive transport; the integumentary system; the skeletal system and joints and bone metabolism; the muscular system and mechanisms of muscular contraction; the nervous system, mechanism of nerve impulse conduction, and the special and somatic senses. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Fall, every year. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0213 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
3 cr.
A continuation of the study of human anatomy and physiology. This semester covers the cardiovascular system and regulation of heart rate, blood pressure and volume, blood typing, and exchange between blood and somatic cells; the respiratory system and mechanisms of acid-base balance; the endocrine system and the regulation of hormone action and release; the digestive system and control of digestive enzymes; the urinary system and electrolyte balance; the immune system, defense mechanisms, and the inflammatory process; nutrition and anabolic and catabolic processes; the reproductive system and its hormonal regulation; and growth and development. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Spring, every year. Prerequisite: BIOL 0212 or permission of the instructor. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0216 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN BIOLOGY
3 cr.
Designed for the non-major, this course covers scientific process and inquiry through a study of current biological topics. Students will evaluate biological discovery and consider its impact on society. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: ENG 0102. GE: Life Sciences

BIOL 0217 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
4cr.

Designed for the student majoring in biology. Introduces basic principles of ecology and evolution, in addition to basic principles of experimental design, sampling, and statistics. Topics that will be covered include organismal, population, and community ecological principles, and microevolutionary and macroevolutionary processes. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: either BIOL 0101 or BIOL 0102 or sophomore standing or consent of instructor. GE: Life Sciences

 

BIOL 0222 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 1 LAB                    
1 cr.

A study of the gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology, and homeostatic mechanisms of the human body, stressing the relationship of structure to function. This semester covers cell types and tissues and the cellular processes of osmosis, diffusion, and active and passive transport; the integumentary system; the skeletal system and joints and bone metabolism; the muscular system and mechanisms of muscular contraction; the nervous system, mechanism of nerve impulse conduction, and the special and somatic senses. Three hours of lab per week.

 

BIOL 0223 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 2 LAB                    
1 cr.
A continuation of the study of human anatomy and physiology. This semester covers the cardiovascular system and regulation of heart rate, blood pressure and volume, blood typing, and exchange between blood and somatic cells; the respiratory system and mechanisms of acid-base balance; the endocrine system and the regulation of hormone action and release; the digestive system and control of digestive enzymes; the urinary system and electrolyte balance; the immune system, defense mechanisms, and the inflammatory process; nutrition and anabolic and catabolic processes; the reproductive system and its hormonal regulation; and growth and development. Three hours of lab per week.  

 

BIOL 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
1–4 cr.
The study of a special topic in biology. Prerequisite: permission of the program director and of the instructor.

BIOL 1302 MICROBIOLOGY
4 cr

This course examines principles of microbiology and immunology including the morphology, physiology, taxonomy, genetics, and ecology of micro-organisms. Viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotic micro organisms including algae, fungi, and protozoa will be studied. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week.


BIOL 1305 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
4 cr.
The biology of invertebrates will be examined at various levels, including their development, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratories will include both bench and field work, emphasizing invertebrates found in northwest Pennsylvania. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab equivalent per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1306 NEUROBIOLOGY
4 cr.

The biology of nervous systems will be studied at various levels, including the cellular and molecular biology of neurons, sensory systems, motor control, and higher cortical functions in humans. All topics are viewed across phyla and from an evolutionary perspective. The course will emphasize scientific reading and oral communication of scientific material. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0203 or consent of instructor.


BIOL 1307 BIOSTATISTICS
2 cr.
Introduces basic experimental design, sampling procedures, and statistical analysis in biological sciences. One hour of lecture and two hours of recitation per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 and college-level math or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1308 FIELD BOTANY
4 cr.
Introduction to vascular plant taxonomy, identification, and classification, with particular emphasis on learning characteristics of plant families, field identification, and recognizing indicator species of various plant habitats. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab equivalent per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1310 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY
4 cr.
This course provides an introduction to animal structure and function. Basic mechanisms of physiology related to major systems will be covered, including neurobiology, endocrinology, movement, circulation, gas exchange, digestion, and ionic and osmotic balance. The course will use a comparative approach that emphasizes how physiological differences among species have evolved based upon the need for the animal to adapt to the environment. Laboratory sessions will be devoted to reinforcement of lecture concepts using modern physiological methods. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 1320.

BIOL 1320 CELL BIOLOGY
4 cr.

Cell structure and function are examined emphasizing energy flow, synthesis of biological macromolecules, molecular genetics, and signal transduction mechanisms. Laboratories explore cell biology phenomena, as well as basic cell and molecular biology skills. Scientific writing and critical thinking will be emphasized. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Pre-requisite: BIOL 0101, 0203. Corequisite: CHEM 0102.


BIOL 1401 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
4 cr.

The development of plants and animals will be studied. A particular emphasis will be made on how conserved molecular mechanisms result in the divergence of living organisms. Model organisms will be used in both lecture and lab to explore developmental processes. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0203.


BIOL 1402 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 cr.

The molecular mechanisms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell function will be studied, emphasizing molecular genetics, protein function, and genomics. The experimental methods used to research cellular and molecular phenomena will be highlighted. Skills in the reading of primary scientific literature and scientific writing will be developed. Laboratories will focus on the experimental process using standard molecular techniques. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0203.


BIOL 1403 PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS
4 cr.
Focuses on the evolutionary ecology of plant-animal interactions. Topics will include herbivory, mutualism with an emphasis on seed dispersal and pollination, and co-evolution. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, & 0217 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1405 POPULATION AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
4 cr.
Introduces population analysis and genetics through a conservation biology approach. In addition to basic population-level topics such as demography, mating systems, and life histories, students will also consider what maintains population viability, the concept of metapopulations, and the issues surrounding conserving biodiversity. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1410 GENOMICS, PROTEOMICS, AND BIOINFORMATICS
3 cr.
The explosion of information in biology over the past few decades has led to the development of a new field called bioinformatics, which is closely aligned with the study of the genome (genomics) and the proteins it codes for (proteomics). This course will focus on the major bioinformatics tools used to explore the genome and proteome. The students will gain proficiency with these programs, in a case-based manner, which will not only teach them essential bioinformatics skills, but will also reinforce their knowledge of cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics concepts. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 0101 required; BIOL 1320 and/or BIOL 1402 recommended.

BIOL 1430 ECOLOGY
4 cr.
Introduction to the interactions of organisms with the living and nonliving environment. Basic ecological principles of populations, communities, and ecosystems will be covered. Topics will include physiological ecology, population growth, interspecific interactions such as mutualism and predation, and community and ecosystem structure and diversity. Laboratory will consist of field exercises combined with data analysis. One overnight field trip will be scheduled, and attendance is strongly recommended. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 or consent of instructor.

BIOL 1435 EVOLUTION
3 cr.
Covers the evidence, theory, and mechanisms of evolutionary change in populations. Topics will include adaptation, selection, co-evolution, speciation, molecular evolution, and an introduction to phylogenetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101, 0102, and 0217 or consent of instructor.

 

BIOL 1440 CANCER BIOLOGY
3 cr.
Discovering a cure for cancer has been one of the most difficult challenges for modern biomedical science. This class will discuss what causes cancer, what makes cancer cells different from normal cells, and what avenues for the future treatment of cancer look promising. The scientific process and a discussion of experimental techniques used in modern cancer research will be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 0101 and BIOL 0203


BIOL 1450 TOPICS IN BIOLOGY
1–4 cr.
The advanced study of a special topic in biology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

BIOL 1451 CAPSTONE
3 cr.
Involves reading primary literature from the diverse subdisciplines of biology and making connections among these and other fields of science. This course enhances scientific writing skills, oral communication, and research methods. It involves student-led presentations of published, original, and peer-reviewed scientific literature. It culminates with a formal research paper that synthesizes primary literature on a biological topic of the student's interest. By the end of the semester, students will have developed greater competence at reading and critiquing primary research articles, gained an ability to write in a scientific format at an advanced level, improved their skills at synthesizing related material from diverse disciplines, and acquired a greater appreciation of the multidisciplinary nature of the field of biology and a deeper understanding of the scientific process. Three hours of lecture per week. Fall, every year. Prerequisite: senior standing. GE: Capstone, Upper-Level Writing.

BIOL 1453 SENIOR SEMINAR
1 cr.
Seminar participants are responsible for preparing and delivering a formal paper, in the style of the presentation of a paper at a scientific meeting, to the biology faculty and students on a seminar theme in biology. Spring semester. Prerequisite: senior standing.

BIOL 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: BIOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Limited to graduating seniors. Prerequisite: permission of the program director and biology faculty supervisor (may not be repeated for credit).

BIOL 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: BIOLOGY
1–3 cr.
Students gain research experience by helping to design and carry out a research project mutually agreed upon by the student and biology faculty supervisor. Permission of the program director and biology faculty supervisor required. Maximum of six credits counted toward biology major.

BIOL 1499 BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP
1–3 cr.

Students gain practical experience in biology in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor. Specific requirements are 45 hours at the intern site per unit of credit earned; a student-kept daily time log and journal of activity; formal oral presentation to biology faculty and students upon completion of the activity; and a confidential, written evaluation by the on-site supervisor to the biology faculty supervisor. Permission of the program director and biology faculty supervisor required. Maximum of three credits counted toward biology major.


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Contact: Professor Lizbeth Matz, Program Director

Major in Business Management

The business management major consists of a 120-credit curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. Consistent with the overall mission of the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, the business management major includes a liberal arts core curriculum, much of which is taken during the first two years of study. Business management majors also take required foundation courses across the fundamental areas of business. Students can specialize in a particular area by taking electives from one of the following five areas of concentration:

• Management Information Systems (MIS)

• Accounting

• Finance

• International Business

• Marketing

 

BS in Business Management Requirements


Course requirements in the major

MGMT 0110 Principles of Management
3
MIS 0103 Microcomputing for Management
3
ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts
4
ACCT 0202 Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
MIS 0208 Business Information Systems
3
FIN 1301 Corporate Finance
3
MRKT 1301 Principles of Marketing
3
MGMT 1401 Business in Society and International Environment
3
MGMT 1451 Capstone: Strategic Management
3
Business management electives*
9
__
36

Other required courses:

ECON 0102 Introduction to Microeconomics
3
ECON 0103 Introduction to Macroeconomics
3
ECON 0204 Statistical Methods
4
ECON 0206 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
MATH 0136 Applied Calculus
4
COMM 0104 Public Speaking
3
__
20

Total credits required for the major
56

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

* Courses required to complete a business management concentration may be applied toward the 9 credit business elective requirement.

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Suggested Course of Study BS in Business Management


First Year

ENG 0101 and 0102

English Composition I and II
6
MGMT 0110 Principles of Management
3
ECON 0102 Introductory Microeconomics
3
ECON 0103 Introductory Macroeconomics
3
MATH 0136 Applied Calculus
4
MIS 0103 Microcomputing for Management
3
COMM 0104 Public Speaking
3
FS 0102 Freshman Seminar
3
__
28

Second Year
ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts
4
ACCT 0202 Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
ECON 0204 Statistical Methods
4
ECON 0206 Intermediate Microeconomics
3
MIS 0208 Business Information Systems
3
General education or elective courses
15
__
31

Third Year
FIN 1301 Corporate Finance
3
MRKT 1301 Principles of Marketing
3
Business electives
6
General education or elective courses
18

__

30

Fourth Year
MGMT 1401 Business in Society and the International Environment
3
MGMT 1451 Capstone: Strategic Management
3
Business elective
3
General education or elective courses
19
__
28

Minor in Accounting

A minor in accounting may be earned by completing the following requirements:

ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts
4
ACCT 0202 Managerial Accounting
3
ACCT 1301 Intermediate Accounting 1
3
ACCT 1302 Intermediate Accounting 2
3
ACCT 1303 Strategic Cost Management
3
ACCT 1304
Federal Income Taxes
3

__
Total credits required for the minor
18

*required for the business management major

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

Business Education Certification

See Secondary Certification in Business, Computer, Information Technology (K–12) under Education Programs.

Minor in Finance

For the finance major, business management majors must complete 9 credits in finance in addition to those credits required for the major.

 

FIN 1301 Corporate Finance*
Four of the following courses:

ACCT 1304
FIN 1302
FIN 1303
FIN 1304
FIN 1401

Federal Income Taxes
Investments
Analysis of Financial Statements
Financial Markets and Institutions
International Finance

 

*required for the major

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Minor in International Business

A minor in international business can be earned by completing the following:

 

GEOG 0101 World Regional Geography
MGMT 1305 International Management
MGMT 1449

Global Economic Systems

FIN 1401 International Finance
MRKT 1420 International Marketing

 

Second language proficiency through and including the intermediate level (or the equivalent) 0-9 credits.

A study abroad experience of at least four weeks in length. Information about the study abroad program can be obtained from either the Director of the Study Abroad Program or the Office of Academic Affairs.

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Minor in Management Information Systems

A minor in management information systems (MIS) can be earned by completing the following 21 credits:

MIS 0208
Business Information Systems
CIST 0150 Fundamentals of Programming
CIST 0163 Introduction to Web Programming
CIST 0165 Networking I

CIST 0209 Introduction to Web Databases  
CIST 1310 Systems Analysis and Design
     
Plus one approved elective:
 
CIST 1311
E-commerce
CIST 1325
Introduction to Supply Chain Management

CIST 1408 Project Management in Information Technology  

 

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 


Minor in Marketing

For the marketing concentration, business management majors must complete 15 credits from the following selection of courses, in addition to those credits required for the major.

 
MRKT 1301
MRKT 1410
Principles of Marketing*
Marketing Research
 
Three of the following:
 

MRKT 1302
MRKT 1303
MRKT 1304
MRKT 1405
MRKT 1415
MRKT 1420 MRKT 1499

HPRED 1301

ENTR 1302

HMGT 1370

COMM 1302

Advertising and Promotion
Selling and Sales Management
Direct Marketing
Marketing Management
Consumer Behavior
International Marketing
Internship in Marketing

Sport Marketing

Marketing the New Venture

Hospitality and Tourism Marketing

Media Advertising

* required for the major

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Minor in Business

Students who major in a discipline other than business management may earn a minor in business management by completing the following requirements:

MGMT 0110
Principles of Management
3
ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts
4
ACCT 0202 Managerial Accounting Concepts
3
MIS 0208 Business Information Systems
3
FIN 1301 Corporate Finance
3
MRKT 1301 Principles of Marketing
3
MGMT 1401 Business in Society and the International Environment
3
__
21

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

Business Management Course Descriptions

ACCT 0201 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS
4 cr.
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of accounting principles and practices. The focus is on preparation and understanding of financial statements, including their role in decision making by both external and internal users.

ACCT 0202 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS
3 cr.
This course focuses on the role of accounting principles and practices, yielding information in the decision-making processes to those managers responsible for the internal aspects of the organization. Cost behavior and its utility in break-even analysis, cost-volume-profit analysis, and budgeting are stressed. Extensive use of computer spreadsheets is included. Prerequisite: ACCT 0201 or ENTR 0201

ACCT 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.

The study of a special topic in accounting.


ACCT 1301 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
3 cr.
This course continues the study of financial accounting principles by providing an intensive analysis of the valuation, measurement, and statement presentation of asset, liability, ownership equity, revenue, and expense components of business enterprise. The emphasis is on asset accounts. Prerequisite: ACCT 0202 or ENTR 0202

ACCT 1302 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
3 cr.
This course continues the study of financial accounting principles by providing an intensive analysis of the valuation, measurement, and statement presentations of asset, liability, ownership equity, revenue, and expense components of business enterprise. The emphasis is on liability and ownership equity accounts and special topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 1301

ACCT 1303 STRATEGIC COST MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

This course focuses on advanced topics in cost and managerial accounting. Emphasis is on standard cost systems and variance analysis: absorption and variance costing; capital budgeting techniques and income tax impact assessment; and short and long range forecasting and reporting.


ACCT 1304 FEDERAL INCOME TAXES
3 cr.
This course provides an in-depth analysis of the federal income tax statutes and regulations relating to the taxation of individuals and sole proprietorships. Topics include concepts of revenue and expenses, tax methods, and treatment of the disposition of property (including capital gains and losses and tax research). Prerequisite: ACCT 0201 or MGMT 0110 or ENTR 0201

ACCT 1305 AUDITING
3 cr.
Principles and procedures of auditing are studied in this course. Included is an examination of generally accepted auditing standards, internal control, audit objectives and reports, form preparation, use of audit work papers, and audit evidence. Prerequisite: ACCT 1302

ACCT 1306 FEDERAL CORPORATE INCOME TAXES
3 cr.
This course examines federal income tax statutes and regulations emphasizing the relationship between management decisions and their tax consequences. Topics include employee compensation and other benefits; depreciation, depletion, and amortization; alternative minimum tax; inventory valuation; and changes in accounting methods. Prerequisites: ACCT 0202 or ENTR 0202

ACCT 1312 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III
3 cr.
Intermediate accounting III is a continuation of intermediate accounting II. The course continues the in-depth examination of financial reporting topics, including: earnings per share, leases, long-term investments, revenue recognition, income taxes and pensions. Prerequisite: ACCT 1302

ACCT 1320 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to accounting information systems and information systems theory. Topics include accounting transaction cycles, internal control concepts, database management, electronic commerce and computer crimes. Prerequisite: MIS 0208

ACCT 1401 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
3 cr.

This course extends the study of financial accounting by examining special topics, including fund accounting, business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and international accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 1302


ACCT 1496 CO-OP IN ACCOUNTING
3 cr.

This course offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom instruction with a practical supervised work experience. 540 documented hours required. The co-op can be worth up to 12 credits. Prerequisites: 75 earned credits and a 3.0 minimum GPA.


ACCT 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: ACCOUNTING
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of accounting. Permission of the instructor is required.


ACCT 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: ACCOUNTING
1-3 cr.
Directed research is designed to give students the opportunity to design and carry out a research project to be agreed upon by the student and a supervising faculty member.

ACCT 1499 ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP
1-3 cr.
An accounting internship provides practical experience in accounting in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor.

FIN 1301 CORPORATE FINANCE
3 cr.

The focus of the course is on the role of the financial manager in maximizing value of the firm. It includes financial decision making within a business firm: financial planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital determination, and characteristics and valuation of securities. Prerequisites: ACCT 0202 or ENTR 0202, MATH 0110 or 0130


FIN 1302 INVESTMENTS
3 cr.
The investments course will acquaint the student who already has some background in business financial matters with the real, ever-changing world of investment decision making. Students will apply previously acquired concepts learned in economics, corporate finance, accounting, and other related courses to the field of investments. Each student will prepare a written investment portfolio recommendation and will make an oral presentation to the class based on the report. Prerequisites: ACCT 0201 or ENTR 0201, ECON 0204

FIN 1303 ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
3 cr.
Financial statement analysis involves the evaluation of current and past financial positions and results of operations for a business firm with the primary objective of forecasting future conditions and performance. Course focuses on the evaluations of accounting information from both the perspective of internal corporate analysis and external credit or securities analysis. Prerequisites: ACCT 020 or ENTR 0201, ECON 0204

FIN 1304 FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS
3 cr.
The mechanics and structure of U.S. financial institutions are examined. Financial markets and instruments are analyzed. The course also covers the management of financial institutions with particular emphasis on commercial banking. Prerequisites: ACCT 0201or ENTR 0201, ECON 0204

FIN 1401 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
3 cr.
Examines the financial function from the standpoint of a multinational corporation. Course focuses on the balance of payments process, the mechanics of foreign exchange markets, corporate management of foreign exchange exposure, and capital budgeting at the international level. International financial markets are also examined. Prerequisites: ACCT 0201 or ENTR 0201, ECON 0204 or permission of instructor. GE: Global

FIN 1496 CO-OP IN FINANCE

This course offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom instruction with a practical supervised work experience. 540 documented hours required. Prerequisites: 75 earned credits and a 3.0 minimum GPA.


FIN 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: FINANCE
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of finance. Permission of the instructor is required.


FIN 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: FINANCE
1-3 cr.
Directed research is designed to give students the opportunity to design and carry out a research project to be agreed upon by the student and a supervising faculty member.

FIN 1499 INTERNSHIP IN FINANCE
1-3 cr.
Practical experience in finance in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor.

MGMT 0101 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
3 cr.
This course is designed for students interested in completing a minor in Business Management or would like a broad overview of business functions. As a survey course, it provides an introduction to the international business environment, business and human resource management, marketing, management information systems, accounting, and finance. This course cannot be used toward the nine credits of required business management electives in the business management major.

MGMT 0110 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
This introductory course focuses on the basic management functions in business. The emphasis is on developing leadership, teamwork, and communication skills. Topics covered include management theory, planning, organizing, leading, motivating, and controlling, as well as management ethics, change, and global perspectives. This course cannot be used toward
the nine credits of required business management electives in the business management major.

MGMT 0115 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH FREE ENTERPRISE
1 cr.
The objective of this course is for students from any discipline to participate in, and reflect upon, a service-learning experience. Service-learning is an educational experience in which students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community and/or university needs. Students will brainstorm, design and implement programs and projects to teach others how market economies and businesses operate. In this course students will go out into the community to make a difference and to develop leadership, teamwork and communication skills through learning, practicing and teaching the principles of free enterprise. Students are required to document the impact of their efforts, whether it is in dollars, educational achievement, or business health.

MGMT 1301 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
(Cross listed with SOC 1305)
3 cr.
This course explains fundamental tasks, processes, and dynamics common to all organizations, with emphasis on behavioral science applications. Focus is on individual, interpersonal, and group behavior within organizations and the interplay of human, technological, and structural factors. Prerequisite: MGMT 0101, SOC 0101 or MGMT 0110.

MGMT 1304 BUSINESS LAW
3 cr.
Business law provides a survey of the legal process and a study of the principles and precepts of business law, contracts, property, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and corporations. Prerequisite: MGMT 0101 or MGMT 0110.

MGMT 1305 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
This course examines the theory of international trade; the social, cultural, and political dimensions of the international environment; the history of the United States in international business; and trends in international competition. An understanding of international operations is developed through case studies and discussion of marketing, financial, and strategic issues. Prerequisites: MGMT 0101 or MGMT 0110 or permission of instructor. GE: GLOBAL

MGMT 1320 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
This course provides an introduction to the field of personnel/human resources management and investigates the role of the personnel manager in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors.  A variety of personal functions and procedures are examined, including:  HR planning, job analysis, performance appraisal, personnel selection, orientation, training and development, compensation and benefits, labor-management relations, civil service systems, EEO/AA, and the impact of legislation of the personnel function. Prerequisites: MGMT 0101 or MGMT 0110.

MGMT 1401 BUSINESS IN SOCIETY AND THE INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
3 cr.
The objective of the course is to provide future managers with an understanding of the external environment affecting organizations and the role of organizations in society. Particular attention will be paid to the interactions between American companies and the international environment and business ethics and corporate social responsibility. Prerequisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302

MGMT 1449 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS
3 cr.
Studies the operation and management of a wide spectrum of economic systems, ranging from the mixed-market systems of the United States, Europe, and Japan to the central-command systems of the former soviet bloc and the emerging markets in southeast Asia. Prerequisites: ECON 0102, 0103 or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed with ECON 1451.

MGMT 1450 TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT
3 cr.

The advanced study of a special topic in business management. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor


MGMT 1451 CAPSTONE: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

3 cr.

An integrating course coordinating concepts from the functional business fields into overall organizational plans and strategies. A focus on real world business applications is an integral part of the course. Numerous cases are analyzed. Prerequisite: completion of all required core business management courses GE: Capstone, Upper-Level Writing.


MGMT 1496 CO-OP IN MANAGEMENT

This course offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom instruction with a practical supervised work experience. 540 documented hours required. Prerequisites: 75 earned credits and a 3.0 minimum GPA.


MGMT 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: MANAGEMENT
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of management. Permission of the instructor is required.


MGMT 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: MANAGEMENT
1-3 cr.
Independent work on a project in business management, supervised by a member of the business faculty. Permission of the instructor is required.

MGMT 1499 INTERNSHIP
1-3 cr.
Practical experience in business in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor.

MIS 0103 MICROCOMPUTING FOR MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Basic computer literacy skills are taught in this course. Students are introduced to business office suite software using Microsoft’s products. Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access are covered. In addition, students are taught basic library research methods.

MIS 0208 BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
3 cr.
Information systems are an integral part of today’s business environment. Students are first introduced to the technology of information systems. Later, students explore various kinds of information systems and their use in solving various types of business problems.

MIS 1407 COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
3 cr.
Competitive intelligence (CI) is a process of selecting, collecting, interpreting, and distributing publicly held information to make strategic business decisions. This course focuses on the how to design and execute such a process, primarily by employing information technology (and the Internet in particular) to transform competitor information into relevant, accurate, and usable knowledge. The course moves through the core phases of the process: acquiring, analyzing, and evaluating competitive information. Case studies and a major project will make up a large element of the course requirements. Prerequisite: MIS 0208

MRKT 1301 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
3 cr.
Introduces students to marketing as an integral component of an effective business strategy to build valuable business partnerships and profitable customer relationships. Topics covered include the marketing environment, managing market information, consumer behavior, market segmentation, branding strategy, product development, pricing, distribution, integrated marketing communication, and marketing ethics. Prerequisites: ENG 0102 required; COMM 0104 recommended.

MRKT 1302 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION
3 cr.
Applies the principles of marketing to the field of integrated marketing communications. Advertising is examined in terms of management, design, and media selection. Promotional tools, including trade and consumer promotions, personal selling, and public relations are also emphasized. The focus is on integrating various strategies to develop a comprehensive advertising and promotion campaign. Pre- or co-requisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302.

MRKT 1303 SELLING AND SALES MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Introduces students to the skills necessary to initiate, build, and maintain customer relationships through personal sales. Legal and ethical issues associated with professional selling are examined. Management principles are also applied to hiring, training, motivating, and compensating a sales team. Pre- or co-requisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302.

MRKT 1304 DIRECT MARKETING
3 cr.
Introduces students to the theoretical, practical, and ethical aspects of direct marketing. Topics covered in the course include mail order, telemarketing, Internet-based strategies, direct response advertising, measurability and accountability, lists, and database marketing. Theoretical approaches will be applied to the direct marketing process, including strategic promotion, traffic building, fund-raising, lead generation, and subscriptions. Prerequisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302.
 
MARKT 1310 MARKETING THE NEW VENTURE
3 cr.

Examines and applies the emerging form of marketing specifically used by small ventures. Its approach to marketing is formulated around six core elements: innovation, calculated risk-taking, resource leveraging, strategic flexibility, customer "intensity," and the creation of industry change. (Cross listed with ENTR 1302)


MRKT 1405 MARKETING MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Students apply key concepts, analytic tools, and strategic approaches developed in previous marketing courses to successful marketing decision making. Specific problems associated with customer relationship management, advancement in technology, global marketing, and brand building are examined. Case study analysis is used extensively. Prerequisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302.

MRKT 1410 MARKETING RESEARCH
3 cr.
Presents an overview of marketing research methodology, techniques, and issues. Survey design, data collection and analysis, interpretation of findings, and presentation of results are emphasized. Students make extensive use of Microsoft Excel for data analysis in this course. Prerequisites: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302; and one of ECON 0204, MATH 0133, or PSY 0201

MRKT 1415 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
3 cr.
Examines the fundamental areas of consumer decision making processes within the context of an overall marketing strategy. Macro sociocultural factors are examined along with a broad range of micro psychological influences on consumer behavior outcomes and choice. Consumer welfare, consumer research methodology, and marketing regulations are also discussed. Prerequisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302.

MRKT 1420 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
3 cr.
This course examines the international application of fundamental marketing principles. This includes social and cultural dimensions, economic environments, as well as political and legal considerations. Other topics include approaching global markets, utilizing a global marketing mix, and executing global strategic leadership. Prerequisite: MRKT 1301 or ENTR 1302 or permission of instructor. GE: GLOBAL

MRKT 1496 CO-OP IN MARKETING
3 cr.
This course offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom instruction with a practical supervised work experience. 540 documented hours required. Prerequisites: 75 earned credits and a 3.0 minimum GPA.

MRKT 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: MARKETING
1-3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of marketing. Permission of the instructor is required.


MRKT 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: MARKETING
1-3 cr.
Directed research is designed to give students the opportunity to design and carry out a research project to be agreed upon by the student and a supervising faculty member.

MRKT 1499 INTERNSHIP IN MARKETING
1-3 cr.
Practical experience in marketing in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor.

 

 

CHEMISTRY

Contacts: Professor Francis Mulcahy, Program Director

Major in Chemistry

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry is an excellent preparation for careers in industry and government and for graduate study. Chemistry majors have the opportunity to become directly involved in research as part of their undergraduate studies.

 

BS in Chemistry Degree Requirements


Course Requirements in the Major
CHEM 0101
and 0102 General Chemistry I and II
8
CHEM 0201 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
4
CHEM 0206, 0207, 0208, and 0209
Organic Chemistry I and II
8
CHEM 1301 and 1302 Physical Chemistry I and II
8
CHEM 1305 Analytical Instrumentation 4
4
CHEM 1451
Capstone: Chemistry
4
Chemistry upper-level electives
6-8
__
42–43

Other required courses:

MATH 0140 and 0150 Calculus I and II
8
MATH 0201
Calculus III
4
PHYS 0201 and 0202 Foundations of Physics I and II
8
PHYS 0203 and 0204 Physics I and II Laboratory
2
__
22

Total credits required for the major
64–65

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

 

Suggested Course of Study BS in Chemistry


First Year
CHEM 0101 and 0102 General Chemistry I and II
8
ENG 0101 and 0102 English Composition I and II
6
MATH 0140 and 0150 Calculus I and II
8
General education or elective courses
9

__

31

Second Year
CHEM 0201
Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
4
CHEM 0206,
0207, 0208, and 0209
Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
8
MATH 0201 Calculus III
4
PHYS 0201 and 0202 Foundations of Physics I and II
8
PHYS 0203 and 0204 Physics I and II Laboratory
2
General education or elective courses
3
__
29

Third Year
CHEM 1301 and 1302 Physical Chemistry I and II
8
CHEM 1305 Analytical Instrumentation
4
General education or elective courses
18
__
30

Fourth Year
CHEM 1451 Capstone: Chemistry
4
General education or elective courses
21
Upper-level chemistry elective
6-8
__
30–31

Minor in Chemistry

A minor in chemistry may be earned by completing the following requirements:

CHEM 0101 General Chemistry I
4
CHEM 0102 General Chemistry II
4
CHEM 0201 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry 4
4
CHEM 0206,
0207, 0208,
and 0209
Organic Chemistry I and II and Labs
8
Chemistry upper-level course
3-4
__
23–24

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Chemistry Course Descriptions

 

CHEM 0089 CONCEPTS OF CHEMISTRY
3 cr.

This course is designed for the non-major or for those students intending to take Chemistry 0101 and 0102, but whose science and mathematical backgrounds are judged to be relatively weak. The course emphasizes stoichiometry (chemical calculations), chemical equations, gas laws, elementary atomic structure and periodic properties of elements. GE:Physical Science


CHEM 0101 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I
4 cr.
The basic principles of chemistry: atomic and molecular structure; stoichiometry; and the general properties of gases, liquids, and solids. The lab emphasizes the basic techniques in quantitative study of chemical processes. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0102 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II
4 cr.
A continuation of CHEM 0101 emphasizing thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and rate processes. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 0101 (with a grade of C- or better) GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0103 BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY

(Cross listed with LIFSCI 0103)

4 cr.
A survey of inorganic chemistry and carbohydrate, lipid, and protein chemistry. The course covers atomic structure, properties of matter, nature of chemical bonds and valence, chemical reactions and equilibria, acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions, elementary radiochemistry, and some chemical arithmetic. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. GE: Life Sciences

 

CHEM 0104 CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
This course is designed to meet the needs of the nonscience student in introductory chemistry. A clear understanding of the effects of chemistry and its influences on everyday life (solutions to the energy problem, maintenance of good health, consumer issues) is presented. Please note that this course may not be taken for credit if CHEM 0101 or CHEM 0102 has been passed. GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0106 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
3 cr.
A global view of the environment and its impact on our changing way of life. How chemistry works and how chemistry is interconnected with other areas of life are studied. Environmental and resource problems and possible solutions are examined. Accurate and up-to-date material is presented using scientific analysis and mathematics. Please note that this course may not be taken for credit if CHEM 0101 or CHEM 0102 has been passed. GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0107 CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT LAB
1 cr.
A laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in CHEM 0106.
Real-world environmental studies with a chemical basis are stressed. Includes field trips to establishments that have an environmental concern. Also includes analysis of aqueous samples from natural settings. Corequisite: CHEM 0106 GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0108 CHEMISTRY AND SOCIETY LAB
1 cr.
An optional laboratory course designed to augment and clarify the concepts presented in CHEM 0104. Experiments include synthesis of aspirin, antacid analysis, and determination of water in popcorn. Includes field trips to crime lab, Kinzua Dam, and the water treatment plant. Corequisite: CHEM 0104 GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0187 DRUGS AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
This course, intended for nonscience majors, provides facts about drug sources, history, action in the body, side effects and interactions, tolerance, abuse potential, and dependency. Drug delivery systems and alternatives will also be covered. All major classifications of drugs will be covered. GE: Physical Sciences

CHEM 0188 DRUGS AND SOCIETY LAB
1 cr.
May be taken concurrently with CHEM 0187. Students will be introduced to instrumentation used by medical chemistry and forensic scientists and will be instructed in the synthesis of drugs (e.g., aspirin). A field trip to the New York State Crime Lab (Olean, N. Y.) will be scheduled. GE: Physical Sciences
 
CHEM 0189 INTRODUCTION TO BIOFUELS
3 cr.
An introduction lecture/lab course involving "biodiesel fuels" with emphasis on practical aspects of this renewable resource which contributes to the new "energy economy." Lecture covers introductory aspects of the fuel, economics, global distribution, feedstock types and lab focuses on biodiesel processing and characterization. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. GE: Physical and Computational Sciences

CHEM 0201 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
4 cr.
Evaluation of analytical data, quantitative and qualitative analysis, gravimetric analysis, volumetric analysis, precipitation titration, neutralization titration, oxidation-reduction analysis, potentiometric methods, spectroscopic methods, chromatography, and fundamental methods of analysis used by all chemists in research. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 0102

CHEM 0206 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I
3 cr.

The chemistry of carbon compounds with emphasis on the methods of preparation and the characteristic properties and reactions of the important classes of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0102 (with grade C or better)


CHEM 0207 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I Lab
1 cr.

Laboratory techniques illustrating fundamental procedures used by organic chemists will be introduced. These techniques include distillation, recrystallization, and extraction. The computer component of the lab includes structural drawing, 3D visualization, and conformational analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 0102 (with grade C or better)


CHEM 0208 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
3 cr.
A continuation of CHEM 0206 emphasizing reactions, syntheses, mechanisms, and intercoversions of more complicated organic molecules. Organic synthesis and analysis are emphasized in lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 0207 (with grade C or better)

CHEM 0209 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II Lab
1 cr.
A continuation of techniques from Organic Chemistry I Lab, including synthesis of target molecules. The computer component includes spectroscopy and molecular modeling, which includes energetics and mechanism. Prerequisite: CHEM 0206 and 0207 (with grade C or better)

CHEM 0251 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in chemistry.

CHEM 1301 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I
4 cr.
Fundamental concepts of physical chemistry, including the structure of matter, principles and application of thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, phase rule, reaction rates, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 0102, MATH 0201, PHYS 0202, 0204

CHEM 1302 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II
4 cr.
A study of solutions, reaction rates, chemical bonds, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1301

CHEM 1304 ORGANIC ANALYSIS
3 cr.
An introduction to spectroscopic methods and instrumentation used by organic chemists for structure determination. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 0208 and 0209

CHEM 1305 ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTATION
4 cr.
Technical training in potentiometric methods, conductometric methods, electrolytic methods, absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic absorption, and performance chromatography. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 0201

CHEM 1306 BIOCHEMISTRY
3 cr.
The chemistry of living systems: proteins, enzymes, lipids, sugars, nucleic acids, biosynthesis, and energetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 0208 and 0209

CHEM 1307 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
A continuation of CHEM 0208 and 0209, introducing molecular orbital theory, lipids, carbohydrates, and heterocyclic systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 0208 and 0209

CHEM 1308 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
4 cr.
A comprehensive overview of the chemistry of water with accent on aqueous environmental problems that include cost, increased energy consumption, national sacrifices, and the benefits of environmental quality. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 0101 or CHEM 0106 and CHEM 0107

CHEM 1312 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY
4 cr.
A continuation of biochemistry (CHEM 1306) with emphasis on peptide, nucleotide synthetic methodology. Further treatment of metabolic processes with oxidative phosphorylation. Laboratory focuses on basic research techniques such as electrophoresis, gel permeation, chromatography, and enzyme kinetics. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1306

CHEM 1315 INTRODUCTION TO WOOD CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
This course will cover the basic principles of wood chemistry and its potential to pulp, paper-making, wood technology, wood waste processing, pulping by-products, bio-mass conversion, cellulose, lignin, wood extracts, etc. Prerequisites: Chemistry 0101 (or equivalent course which has a college chemistry laboratory component).
CHEM 1435: INTERPRETATION OF MASS SPECTRA
3 cr.
This course introduces students to the determination of molecular structure using mass spectrometry. Topics include isotopes, molecular ion determination, and fragmentation via unimolecular decomposition. Prerequisite: CHEM 0208
 
CHEM 1437: TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
3 cr.
This course examines the effects of structure and bonding on chemical properties and the application of periodic relationship to selected families of elements. Topics include synthesis, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy or inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 0208 and CHEM 1301
CHEM 1451 CAPSTONE: CHEMISTRY
4 cr.
A yearlong project supervised by a member of the chemistry faculty. Two credits the first semester and two credits the second. The first semester will consist of class meetings to introduce students to searching the chemical literature, gathering of references relating to the student's project, and conducting any laboratory work necessary to the completion of the project. The second semester will be spent writing and editing an extensive paper using acs format and conducting an oral presentation of the research. GE Capstone, Upper Level Writing

 

CHEM 1455 TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY
1-3 cr.
The advanced study of a special topic in chemistry. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

 

CHEM 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: CHEMISTRY
1-3 cr.
Directed study in a specific area of chemistry. Permission of the instructor is required.

 

CHEM 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH:CHEMISTRY
1-3 cr.
Independent work on a chemistry project supervised by a member of the chemistry faculty. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

 

CHEM 1499 CHEMISTRY INTERNSHIP
1-3 cr.
Practical experience in chemistry in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

COLLEGE SUCCESS

College Success Course Description

College Success can be taken by any student at any time. It is best taken by all freshman in their first semester. It is mandatory for all provisional freshman acceptances.

 

LNSK 0101 COLLEGE SUCCESS
1 cr.

This course lays a strong foundation for a successful transition to college by increasing critical thinking, curiosity, goal orientation, and motivation. It provides a basic orientation to the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. Students will be introduced to a strengths approach to learning, and opportunities to develop practical skills and strategies for addressing the challenges of college.

 

COMMUNICATIONS (Television and Radio)

Contact: Professor Jeffrey Guterman, Program Director and Chair of the Communication and the Arts Division

Major in Communications (Television and Radio)

The communications major at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford prepares students for careers in radio and television, careers related to the electronic media, and for graduate study. The comprehensive program combines a liberal arts background with specialized instruction in radio and television communication.

The communications student explores media history, message design and production techniques, advertising strategies, theories of communication, and programming and management principles. The program provides production training in radio and television, using professional-quality digital equipment both in the studio and in the field. Students engage in a number of audio and video projects while learning to use the technology needed for assembling effective electronic messages.

Graduates of the communications program are prepared for positions in media production, on-air performance, advertising, sales, and programming. The program includes internship opportunities at local and regional television and radio stations.

 

BA in Communications Requirements

Course requirements in the major

COMM 0102 Survey of Broadcasting
3
COMM 0103 Broadcast Journalism
3
COMM 0202 Radio Production Workshop
4
COMM 0203 Introduction to Television Production
4
COMM 0210

Social Media Communication

3
COMM 1301
Advanced Television Production
4
COMM 1302
Media Advertising
3
COMM 1401 Broadcast Programming and Management
3
COMM 1403 Current Issues in Mass Media
3
COMM 1451 Capstone: Communications
3
COMM 0101
Introduction to Human Communication
3
or
COMM 0104
Public Speaking
COMM 0201 The Mass Media and Society
3
__
Total credits required for the major
39
Required minor*
15–21

Note: Transfer students who have earned a previous degree, or Pitt-Bradford students with a second major, do not need to complete a minor.

General Education Program Requirements and Electives—Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.)

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

Suggested Course of Study BA in Communications


First Year
COMM 0102 Survey of Broadcasting
3
COMM 0103 Broadcast Journalism
3
ENG 0101
and 0102
English Composition I and II
6
MATH 0110 Fundamentals of Mathematics
3
COMM 0101 Introduction to Human Communication
or
COMM 0104 Public Speaking
3
General education or elective courses
12

__
30

Second Year
COMM 0201 The Mass Media and Society
3
COMM 0202 Radio Production Workshop
4
COMM 0203 Introduction to Television Production
4
COMM 0210 Social Media Communication
3
Course in minor
3
General education or elective courses
12
__
29

Third Year
COMM 1301 Advanced Television Production
4
COMM 1302 Media Advertising
3
Courses in minor
6
General education or elective courses
16
__
29

Fourth Year
COMM 1401 Broadcast Programming and Management
3
COMM 1403 Current Issues in Mass Media
3
COMM 1451 Capstone: Communications
3
Courses in minor
6–12
General education or elective courses
13–19
__
28–40

Minor in Communications

A minor in communications may be earned by completing the following course requirements:

COMM 0102 Survey of Broadcasting
3
COMM 0103 Broadcast Journalism
3
COMM 0201 The Mass Media and Society
3
COMM 0202 Radio Production Workshop
4
COMM 0203 Introduction to Television Production
4
COMM 1302 Media Advertising
3
__
20

Communications Course Descriptions

 

COMM 0101 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
An introductory survey course designed to familiarize students with the many contexts of human communication, such as interpersonal, small-group, organizational, public speaking and media communication. GE: Behavioral Sciences

COMM 0102 SURVEY OF BROADCASTING
3 cr.
A contemporary and historical survey of the use and impact of the electronic media, including technological and program development, regulations, controls, economics, and audiences. The role of the Internet in radio and television media is also explored.

COMM 0103 BROADCAST JOURNALISM
3 cr.
This course covers the principles of broadcast journalism with practical experience in writing news stories for radio and television. Analysis of broadcast news program procedures also is included.

COMM 0104 PUBLIC SPEAKING
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the composition and delivery of informative, persuasive, and ceremonial speeches with attention to speech design, delivery, and organization.

COMM 0106 NEWS WRITING
3 cr.
This is an introduction to writing for news media, including the techniques and functions of reporters. The essentials and types of writing for the media are examined, as well as appropriate ethical and legal issues. Emphasis is on both real and hypothetical writing assignments and class discussion of the results.

COMM 0107 NEWS EDITING
3 cr.
This course offers practical experience in editing and the exploration of its function in modern journalism. Prerequisite: COMM 0106

COMM 0108 NEWSPAPER STAFF (THE SOURCE)
1-3 cr.
Students write, edit, design, sell advertising, take photographs, and prepare artwork for The Source, the official student newspaper of the campus. This is an activity credit course that may be repeated for up to six credits.

COMM 0109 INTRODUCTION TO CINEMA
3 cr.
As a popular art form, cinema plays a major role in what we see as contemporary artistic expression. This course examines the artistry of technique, the creative depth of various films, with an emphasis on how the story gets told. Cinematography, editing, lighting, sound, and other creative elements that make each film unique are explored. GE: Arts

COMM 0110 ROCK 'N' ROLL, PART ONE, TO 1970
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to “rock and roll,” arguably the most important form of mass media generated popular art from the middle of the 20th century until the present. Specifically, this course will use certain developments in mass media technology as a lens through which to examine popular songs as “texts” of cultural, social, political, and artistic significance. These technological innovations include Edison’s phonograph and Berliner’s gramophone, to be sure, but we will also consider developments such as the long playing (LP) album, the transistor radio, the 45 rpm record, jukeboxes, and wall boxes. The bulk of the course, however, will explore the rise of what came to be called “rock and roll” between Elvis Presley’s national emergence in 1956 to the point when the Beatles stopped recording in 1969. GE: Cultures/Western

COMM 0111 ROCK 'N' ROLL, PART TWO, 1970 - TODAY
3 cr.
This course is an examination of trends in American popular music culture from 1970 to today. While we will examine rock songs as social, political, and musical documents, a principal concern will be how the mass media in general and technological innovation in particular have affected—if not determined—the nature and kinds of popular music that have characterized the last quarter of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st. We will focus on the period in which"rock 'n' roll" evolved into "rock" holding the center of American popular culture, from 1970 until the mid 90's. Topics for investigation include the effect of MTV, the rise of hip-hop culture, peer-to-peer file sharing and its impact on the recording industry. GE: Cultures/Western

COMM 0115 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
This course is a survey of major theories and research in interpersonal communications and their application in various settings, including the small group. Units of instruction include self-concept, stages of relationship building, types of relationships, power, and conflict. GE: Behavioral Sciences, Economics, Political Science.

COMM 0120 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION                                    
3 cr.

This course explores the dynamics of culture and communication, and the social effects generated by their interaction.  This course emphasizes the establishment and maintenance of student understanding of intercultural dynamics in a manner that positively impacts life outside the classroom. GE: Cultures/non-western


COMM 0201 THE MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY
3 cr.
This is a survey of the role of the mass media in American society and exploration of the uses of these media. Special emphasis is on methods of examining the control, content, audience, and effects of the press, radio, television, motion pictures, and the Internet. GE: Behavioral Sciences

COMM 0202 RADIO PRODUCTION WORKSHOP
4 cr.
This course provides creative training in studio operations and procedures, along with a general overview of the commercial radio station. Students develop and produce public service announcements, commercials, interviews, radio drama, news, and music programs.

COMM 0203 INTRODUCTION TO TELEVISION PRODUCTION
4 cr.
Basic concepts and techniques used in television studio production. Students design, produce, and direct short television programs.

COMM 0205 SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION
3 cr.
Designed to help students improve leadership and membership skills within the small group environment. A major research project is required. Prerequisite: COMM 0104 GE: Behavioral Sciences
 
COMM 0210 SOCIAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION
3 cr.

New media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, text messaging, electronic gaming devices, YouTube, etc.) have been dramatically changing human communication and interaction in the modern society. This course uses media literacy approaches and information-processing tasks to introduce the niche perspectives of mass audience, developments of mass media industries, multiple dimensions of social realities, and potential effects of hyper-online relationships. Learners will explore a variety of communication theories and practices in examining the use of new media. GE: Behavioral Science

 
COMM 0215 BOLLYWOOD: POPULAR INDIAN CINEMA
3 cr.

This course introduces students to the fascinating world of Bollywood - the Hindi Film industry. We will discuss the many facets of Hindi movies such as: dance, music, themes, and social customs.  Students will also view Bollywood films (complete with sub-titles). We will use both classic and current Bollywood cinema for this course and trace the development of stylistic and aesthetic changes throughout.  Further, we will explore the notion of popular cinema.  Specifically, we will inquire into the importance of the popular in a non-Western context and why we must take the popular seriously as a mode of knowledge production, which shapes both cultural practice and aspects of cultural production beyond the cinematic.  Through this course, students will learn how Bollywood has emerged as a major player in global media. GE: Cultural/Global


COMM 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.

The study of a special topic in communications.


COMM 1301 ADVANCED TELEVISION PRODUCTION
4 cr.
This course covers advanced techniques of television production, emphasizing remote production, editing procedures, and writing. Students learn advanced television production theory and prepare several videotape projects. Prerequisite: COMM 0203

COMM 1302 MEDIA ADVERTISING
3 cr.
Explores advertising and society, message preparation and placement, the evolution of advertising, regulatory concerns, and the development of advertising plans. Media examined include television, radio, print, and the Internet. Special emphasis is on issues surrounding current advertising methods. Prerequisites: COMM 0102 or MRKT 1302

 

COMM 1306 AMERICAN CINEMA 
3 cr.

Motion pictures are one of the dominant forms of art in the United States today. What makes them art? More specifically, what influences their content? This course will explore these questions from a variety of perspectives and ask students to think critically about the art of the motion picture.

 

COMM 1307 VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS      
  3 cr.

This course develops a visual grammar for the images that we make and receive. We examine the nature of light and the physiology of the eye and brain, the social construction of symbols, and what ethical responsibilities makers of visual messages must consider. We also explore the role of digital technology in the generation and interpretation of visual messages. GE: Culture/Euro-American

 

COMM 1308 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION                  
 3cr.

This course explores and analyzes theories and principles of communication structures. It

focuses on concepts and topics within organizational communication such as socialization

of employees, communication and leadership, groups and individual decision making, conflict, and the development of organizational culture.

                                                                                    
COMM 1309 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS         
        3 cr.

This course examines the communications methods of environmentalism—those of both

business and industry and those of the environmental movement. While the course is

concerned with some of the issues that relate to the environment—land use, air resources,

global warming, pollution, among many others—its primary concern is the communications

questions that these issues illustrate or suggest. We develop and revise 25 pages of material. Prerequisite: Junior standing or completion of the general education competencies

GE: Culture/Euro-American

                                               

           

                     

COMM 1335 NEWSPAPER SENIOR STAFF—THE SOURCE
3 cr.

This upper-level course offers leadership experience for student journalists of the college newspaper’s senior staff. The senior members of the Source staff are the editor-in-chief, the managing editor and business manager. The senior editors oversee the writers of the newspaper: They chair the staff’s three-times-a-week meetings; they assign, gather and edit final copy for the six issues of the newspaper that are published during each of the fall and spring terms, as well as oversee the design and layout of the paper. The editor-in-chief also manages the efforts of the business manager, whose job is to solicit appropriate advertising from the campus community, regional businesses and national advertisers. This course is repeatable and is open to the editor-in-chief, the managing editor and, with the instructor’s permission, the business manager. Prerequisite: COMM 0108


COMM 1401 BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AND MANAGEMENT
3 cr.
Programming techniques used in radio and television and a study of the organizational structure of broadcast stations, including responsibilities of station personnel. The focus is on analysis of management decision-making processes with emphasis on policies, sales, and program selection. Prerequisite: COMM 0102

COMM 1403 CURRENT ISSUES IN MASS MEDIA
3 cr.
Using a seminar/workshop format, students will think about, discuss, and write on critical societal, ethical, regulatory, political, and economic issues as they relate to the mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 0101, 0102 GE: Upper-Level Writing

COMM 1410 PERSUASION
3 cr.
This course will explore theories, principles, and strategies of persuasion and social influence as they apply to everyday, interpersonal, and face-to-face contexts in which influence attempts to take place.

COMM 1450 TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION
3 cr.

The advanced study of a special topic in communication. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor


COMM 1451 CAPSTONE: COMMUNICATIONS
3 cr.
Comprehensive audio and video projects using both remote and studio equipment. The focus is on the completion of a senior-quality sample reel, using linear and nonlinear video editing technology. Prerequisites: COMM 0203, 1301 GE: Capstone.

COMM 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: COMMUNICATIONS
1–3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of communications. Permission of the instructor is required.


COMM 1498 DIRECTED PROJECT: COMMUNICATION
1–3 cr.
Independent work on a project in communication supervised by a member of the communication faculty. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

COMM 1499 INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION
1–3 cr.
Practical experience in applied communication in a professional setting. Work is directed by the employer and evaluated jointly with the faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

 

 

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

Contact: Professor ‘BioDun J. Ogundayo

Minor in Comparative Literature

A minor in comparative literature may be earned by completing the following requirements:

Course Electives for the Comparative Literature Minor

ENG 0110 Literature and Interpretation
3
Second Language   2 courses in sequence at the 200 level
6
CLP 1315 Critical Methods
3
CLP 1450 Topics in Comparative Literature
3
Electives   2 CLP courses, including 1 at the 1300 level or above
6
     
21


Electives

 

CLP 0206 Hispanic Literature in Translation  
CLP 0207 Short Fiction in Spanish  
CLP 1301 The Modernist Tradition
 
CLP 1320 African Literature and Spirituality  
ENG 0105 Masterpieces of World Literature  
ENG 0219 African-American Writers  
PHIL 0203 Philosophy in Literature  
PHIL 0207 Existentialism  
THEA 0203 Play Analysis  
THEA 1301 Dramatic Theory and Criticism  

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 


Comparative Literature Course Descriptions


CLP 0203 FILM AND LITERATURE
3 cr.
A comparative study of literature and filmmaking, films based on works of literature, and mutual influences of technique. Prerequisite: one literature course GE: Literature

CLP 0206 HISPANIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
3 cr.
Readings in representative works from Spain and Spanish America, with emphasis on contemporary literature. (The denomination “Hispanic” may also embrace works in Portuguese or of Spanish writers in the United States.) Taught in English. Prerequisite: ENG 0102 GE: Literature

 


CLP 0207 SHORT FICTION IN SPANISH
3 cr.
This course offers students an introduction to the works of several well-known Spanish and Latin American authors. Students will gradually develop their reading skills in Spanish by reading and discussing short pieces of fiction, thus enhancing their vocabulary, grammar, stylistic appreciation, and cultural knowledge of the Spanish language and the various Hispanic cultures. Texts have been selected to provide students with a smooth transition from language classes to an appreciation of Hispanic literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 0201

CLP 0208 FRENCH LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the great body of literature that is contemporary French narrative. Students will read a representative sample of some of the most important authors of this century, looking at their themes, narrative techniques, and the interaction between the two. The two main genres are the short story and the novel. During the semester, students will also be viewing films based on well-known French novels or short stories. The class will be encouraged to discuss the films in light of what they learned in the course. GE: Literature

CLP 0216 MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE: THE NOVEL
3 cr.
The course will explore selected texts of African literature written in English or translated into English. It covers major modern African fiction and its role in explaining African politics, culture, and religion. Appropriate audio-visual material is included to give students a basic but comprehensive background in postcolonial African literature and culture. Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Agambila’s postcolonial fiction, Mariama Ba’s So Long Letter, as well as Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka’s and other representative works will be studied. Prerequisite: ENG 0102 GE: Literature/Non-Western and Global

CLP 0220 CARIBBEAN LITERATURES AND CULTURES
3 cr.
The history, culture, and politics of the Caribbean are studied through the works of major authors. Representative cultural and audiovisual products are also covered. Diversity and hybridity, as key features of Caribbean identity, are discussed. The role of the United States in the shaping of this region will also be examined. Areas covered include Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, and the West Indies. GE: Literature/Non-Western and Global
 
CLP 0230 MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE AND CULTURES
3 cr.

The Middle East has diverse cultures, religions, and geographies-- from northern West Africa through the Mediterranean all the way to the borders of central Asia. This course is focused on the study of modern Middle Eastern cultures presented in texts in English translation. Nonfictional and fictional audio-visual material from the region will be used, in thematic manner, to provide students with a better sense of the diverse cultures of the region. The course is also an opportunity to foster a learning community about this region, in order to reassess stereotypes of the region, as often portrayed in popular western media. The course material is also meant to help students have a better knowledge of the attitudes and dynamism of these societies. s. Some themes covered include tradition and modernity, nationalism and globalization, diversity, identity, war and revolution, dictatorship and freedom. Prerequisite: ENG 0101 or permission of instructor.  GE: Literature/Global

 


CLP 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS
3 cr.
The study of a special topic in comparative literature.

CLP 1310 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE
3 cr.
This course covers literature from Africa, the Caribbean, and the Asian subcontinent from the period of colonization to the present. It examines the literature in the context of empire, independence, ethnicity, religion, and national identity. It draws on contemporary works in postcolonial theory by Said, Ngugi, Chatterjee, Zizek, Achebe, Jameson, and others. Prerequisite: one other English course GE: Literature/Non-Western and Global

CLP 1315 CRITICAL METHODS
3 cr.
An introduction to modern critical theory and literary analysis. Special attention paid to attempts made in this century to construct a general theory of literature incorporating methods from other disciplines (structural linguistics, semantic philosophy, Marxism, phenomenology, existentialism, psychology).

CLP 1320 AFRICAN LITERATURE AND SPIRITUALITY
3 cr.
African belief systems as reflected in African literature, art, and culture. By way of novels, videos, and theoretical texts, we will examine the metaphysical landscape of Africa in order to underscore the universality of the spiritual experience across human civilizations. Students will be exposed to myths and schemata that explain the African vision(s) of the world. GE: Literature/Non-Western and Global

CLP 1350 LATINA WRITERS
3 cr.
Offering a wide and richly-textured view of the realities of Latina identity in the Caribbean, Central and South America, and the United States, this course offers students an opportunity to study the many elements that contribute to those identities and the literary forms in which they are presented. The genres studied will be the novel, essay, poetry, and plays. Readings are in English. GE: Literature

CLP 1450 TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
3 cr.
An advanced study of a special topic in comparative literature such as non-Western spirituality, comparative mythology and literature, and women’s voices in postcolonial literature. Prerequisites: junior standing with one course in literature or permission of the instructor


CLP 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
3 cr.

Directed study in a specific area of comparative literature. Permission of the instructor is required.


CLP 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
3 cr.
Directed research is designed to give students the opportunity to design and carry out a research project to be agreed upon by the student and a supervising faculty member.



COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY

Contact: Professor Don Lewicki, Program Director

Major in Computer Information Systems and Technology

The Computer Information Systems and Technology (CIS&T) major consists of a 120-credit curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. CIS&T majors gain hands-on experience as well as conceptual knowledge in a broad range of information technologies and systems. Foundation courses focus on specific technologies while upper level courses concentrate on application and integration of technologies in the business environment. Students are also encouraged to take the minor in business management or entrepreneurship to gain a deeper understanding of business fundamentals.

 

BS in Computer Information Systems
and Technology Requirements

Course requirements in the major




CIST 0150

Programming Fundamentals

3

CIST 0161

Technology of Computing

3

CIST 0163

Introduction to Web Technology

3

CIST 0165

Networking I

3

CIST 0166

Networking II

3

CIST 0261

Computer Security

3

CIST 0262

Systems Administration

3

CIST 0265

Information Structures

3

CIST 1307

Database Design and Management

3

CIST 1310

Systems Analysis and Design

3

CIST 1311

Electronic Commerce

3

CIST 1325

Introduction to Supply Chain Management

3

CIST 1408

Project Management in Information Technology

3

CIST 1499

CIS&T Internship

3

CIST 1451

Capstone

3






45




Choose 3 approved electives

(See advisor for other approved electives)

CIST 1320

User Interface Design

3

CIST 1401

Information Assurance

3

CIST 1415

Data Mining

3

CIST 1431

Multimedia Introduction and Application

3

CIST 1301

Advanced Web Technologies

3






9

Other required courses

MATH 0133 or ECON 0204

Statistics

4

MATH 0135

Discrete Math

3






7




Total credits required for the major: 61


 

General Education Program Requirements and Electives-Variable

(See General Education Program and General Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree under Academic Policies and Guidelines for further details.).

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 

Suggested Course of Study BS in CIS&T

First Year



FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3

ENG 0101

English Composition I

3

CIST 0150

Programming Fundamentals

3

CIST 0161

Technology of Computing

3

CIST 0165 Networking I  
ENG 0102 English Composition II  

CIST 0163

Introductory to Web Programming

3

CIST 0166

Networking II

3

  General Education Course 3

MATH 0098 or MATH 0110

College Algebra II or Fundamentals of Mathematics

3



__



30




Second Year



MATH 0135 Discrete Math 3

CIST 0261

Computer Security

3

CIST 0262

Systems Administration

3

CIST 0265

Information Structures

3

MATH 0133 or ECON 0204

Statistics

4

CIST 1310

Systems Analysis and Design

3

  General education or elective courses 12



__



31




Third Year



CIST 1307

Database Design and Management

3

CIST 1325

Introduction to Supply Chain Management

3

  CIST Electives 6
  General education or elective courses 19



__



31




Fourth Year



CIST 1408

Project Management in Information Technology

3

CIST 1499

Internship

3

CIST 1451

Capstone

3

  CIST Elective 3
  General education or elective courses 16



___



28


Course Descriptions

CIST 0150 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMMING 3 cr.
The course is designed to provide the student with an adequate understanding of programming concepts and principles to enable the student to design and implement programs for his or her own use or use in the classroom.

CIST 0161 THE TECHNOLOGY OF COMPUTING 3 cr.
IT professionals will encounter a variety of platforms in their career. The role of the IT professional is to select. deploy, integrate, and administer platforms or components to support the organization's it infrastructure. This course covers the fundamentals of hardware and software and how they integrate to form essential components of IT systems.

CIST 0162 SURVEY OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 cr.
This course provides an overview of the discipline of IT, describes how IT relates to other computing disciplines, and begins to instill an IT mindset. The goal is to help students understand the diverse contexts in which it is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technology. Students will study in detail fundamental technology components of information systems.

CIST 0163 INTRODUCTION TO WEB PROGRAMMING 3 cr.
The concepts of Web programming. Prominently featured are the extensible markup language (XML) and CSS. Both client-side and server-side scripting through Web database access will be introduced. Assignments will focus developing skills using XML and expandable form in Web page design. Prerequisites: CIST 0161, CIST 0162

CIST 0165 NETWORKING I 3 cr.
Networking I builds a deeper understanding of how networks work, including the topics of LANS, WANS, service providers, packets, hubs, routers, switches, Internet protocols routing and switching and the physical layer. Prerequisites: CIST 0161

CIST 0166 NETWORKING II 3 cr.
Networking II builds upon the basic networking concepts provided in Networking I by adding the ideas of networking security to the discussion. Concepts covered include: cryptography, key algorithms, firewalls, wireless and mobile security and Internet security. Prerequisites: CIST 0165

CIST 0197 DIRECTED STUDY COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 1–3 cr.
Directed study in computer information systems and technology. Permission of instructor required.

CIST 0205 WEB APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT 3 cr.
The focus of this course is the development of basic, dynamic web applications and the concepts and issues involved in their development. Students learn current software technologies such as Visual Studio as well as current design and development methodologies.

CIST 0209 INTRODUCTION TO WEB DATABASES 3 cr.
The basic concepts of data models, data sub-languages, and user-oriented query-languages in a network environment. The emphasis will be on the Structured Query Language (SQL), and the Programming Language/SQL (PL/SQL).

CIST 0250 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 cr.
The study of a special topic in computer information systems and technology.

CIST 0261 COMPUTER SECURITY 3 cr.
This course is an introduction to the concepts of data security, including policies, attacks, vulnerabilities, encryption, information states, and forensics. Prerequisites: CIST 0166.

CIST 0262 SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION 3 cr.
This course focuses on those skills and concepts essential to the administration of computing systems, networks, software, file systems, Web systems, database systems, and system documentation, policies and procedures. This also includes education and support of the users of these systems. Laboratory sessions will consist of demonstrations and hands-on work in this area. Prerequisites: CIST 0161, CIST 0166

CIST 0265 INFORMATION STRUCTURES 3 cr.
This course provides students an opportunity to further develop and refine their programming skills. In particular, the emphasis of this course is on the organization of information, the implementation of common data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs, and techniques of data abstraction, including encapsulation and inheritance. Prerequisites: CIST 0150

CIST 1301 ADVANCED WEB DEVELOPMENT 3 cr.
This course focuses on building interactive web sites and web applications. Emphasis is placed on database connectivity, web standards, and separation of code into presentation, persistence, and processing layers. CSS and JavaScript will be used to create a proper presentation layer. To handle processing and persistence, Ruby on Rails, along with the MySQL database server will be used. Prerequisites: CIST 0163, CIST0265

CIST 1307 DATABASE MANAGEMENT 3 cr.
The structure, use, and design of database management systems (DBMS) architecture. Topics include basic concepts and discussion of database models, data sublanguages, and user-oriented query languages. Management issues such as the role of the DB administrator, data security, and recovery are also discussed

CIST 1310 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3 cr.
Students are introduced to the basic concepts, methodologies, and tools used by systems analysts in the development of new information systems. Topics include problem-solving methods, system investigation, analysis, logical design, system maintenance, team dynamics, and data collection techniques and procedures. Prerequisite: CIST 0162

CIST 1311 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE 3 cr.
Electronic commerce will be studied using cases, lectures, readings, and hands-on E-Commerce technology evaluations. Student teams will give presentations analyzing individual Web sites, including a detailed analysis and evaluation of the business model being used. Prerequisite: CIST 0162

CIST 1320 USER INTERFACE DESIGN 3 cr.
The primary focus of this course is the successful design and implementation of user interfaces. Technical details, strategies, and principles will be examined, as well as concepts from human cognition studies. Prerequisite: CIST 0205.

CIST 1325 INTRODUCTION TO SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3 cr.
Supply Chain Management is about the management of material and information flows in multi-stage production-distribution networks. Driven by fierce global competition and enabled by advanced information technology, many companies have taken initiatives to reduces costs and at the same to increase responsiveness to changes in the marketplace. This course will provide students with the technical knowledge and the tools necessary to develop, implement, and sustain strategies for managing supply chain issues. Prerequisites: CIST 0162

CIST 1408 PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3 cr.
This course provides a comprehensive approach to project management within the context of information technology. The course addresses the culture, principles, and basic techniques of managing technical projects. Basic tools of project management, such as work breakdown structure, scheduling, contracting, cost analysis, and risk management, are explained and demonstrated. Prerequisites: MIS 1310

CIST 1415 DATA MINING
Data Mining seeks to provide the tools for the extraction of timely, strategic, informative, or previously unknown gems of information. Looking for patterns, statistically sound data correlation/discovery by association and classification, for example, can unearth knowledge buried within these huge databases. Prerequisite: CIST 1307.

CIST 1431 MULTIMEDIA INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION 3 cr.
This course introduces students to current practices, technologies, methodologies, and authoring systems in the design and implementation of systems that incorporate text, audio, images, animation and full-motion video. Students will complete multimedia projects using state-of-the-art tools. Prerequisite: CIST1301 or permission of instructor

CIST 1450 TOPICS IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 3 cr.
The advanced study of a special topic in computer information systems and technology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CIST 1451 CAPSTONE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 3 cr.
A capstone, project-oriented study of the planning, analysis, design and implementation of a business system using model-based software tools and available technology platforms. Much attention is given to communication and team skills. Student teams will be given a user-request for development and expected to develop appropriate systems in response. A final written report will be required as well as an oral summary. GE: Capstone

CIST 1497 DIRECTED STUDY: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 1-3 cr.
Directed study in a specific area of computer information systems and technology. Permission of the instructor is required.

CIST 1498 DIRECTED RESEARCH: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY 1-3 cr.
Independent work on a project in computer information systems and technology, supervised by a member of the computer information systems and technology faculty. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CIST 1499 INTERNSHIP 1-3 cr.
This course is designed to provide the upper-level student an opportunity to assist with the planning and implementation of computing technologies and systems in an approved on-campus site or an approved off-campus site. Students may perform information systems and technology training/consulting and/or end-user support duties. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 

AS in Information Systems Degree Requirements

 

See Information Systems


Minor in Criminal Forensic Studies

Contact: Tony Gaskew, Program Director

A minor in criminal forensic studies is designed to provide students with a theoretical and applied understanding of the nature of criminal investigations and how forensic tools are used to conduct criminal investigations. Students will be exposed to variety of mock crime scenes, which will include violent crimes, property crimes, drug crimes, computer and white collar crimes. Students will also apply investigative report writing techniques and crime scene processing methods.

A minor in criminal forensic studies can be earned by completing the following 20 credits:

(students must earn a C- or better in all minor courses and a GPA of 2.0 in the minor is required)

Required courses:

 

CIST 0161 The Technology of Computing
ADMJ 0230 Introduction to Forensic Science
ADMJ 1302 Criminal Law and Procedure
ADMJ 1325 Criminal Evidence and Investigations
ADMJ 1330 Criminal Forensics I
ADMJ 1331 Criminal Forensics I Lab
ADMJ 1430 Criminal Forensics II
ADMJ 1431 Criminal Forensics II Lab

 

Students who are criminal justice majors cannot use the courses in the minor to satisfy the law enforcement content area of the criminal justice major.

 

Please be advised that some programs or courses of study require that students complete rotations, fieldwork, internships/externships and/or teaching assignments at facilities external to the university, while other programs or courses of study may offer voluntary internships or externships at facilities external to the university.  Depending on the program or course, such facilities will or may require a criminal background check, an act 33/34 clearance (if applicable), and perhaps a drug screen to determine participant qualification or eligibility. Additionally, in order to become licensed, many states will inquire as to whether the applicant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, a felony, or a felonious or illegal act associated with alcohol and/or substance abuse. 

 


 









































 
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